Teds latest video – Why do Headshots make Animals go Crazy?

Forums Hunting Teds latest video – Why do Headshots make Animals go Crazy?

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    ztirffritz
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    In all the excitement over the Impact review video, I completely missed that this video also dropped today.  Ted’s been busy indeed!

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    1kshooter
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    Fantastic video Ted..as always! I would like to thank you for the time and energy that goes into them as we all learn and grow with them, this video in point shows us factual information about stuff we only guessed about before!
    Thanks again Jonathan 

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    sharroff
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    Good video…like having the Dr. involved.

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    FukoChan
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    Now Ted can make his videos freely, without all those people who “stumbled” onto his videos accidently, and commenting on how cruel he is for hunting animals. Ted can just insert a link to this video for every future hunting vid.

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    Kim
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    So oscillating muscle activity is due to spinal neuron discharge without the inhibitory effect of the brain (on spinal neurons).  ie the brain’s inhibition has been removed (by destroying the brain), allowing the spinal cord to fire the muscles.

    If this is true then shouldn’t you get the same result by severing the cord (say) at the neck level, which also removes brain inhibition?  I think the answer is yes – based on what happens to beheaded chickens.  But have you also seen this with neck shots while hunting?

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    glengiles
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    Great video. 

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    BumbleB
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    Thanks for the education.

    Here is another question that myself and many others have wondered. When a deer, bear, moose or elk is heart shot, how in the hell do they take off sometimes for may yards? I have seen heart shot deer for over 80 yards!

    My guess would be adrenalin.
     

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    HW100KT
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       Thank you Ted, now I can sleep nights!

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    amoxom
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    BumbleB, with a heart shot deer or elk, it is usually a fatal wound. However, their will to live and escape danger is a huge factor. Also, a heart/lung shot deer dies from a combination of shock/trauma, blood loss and asphyxiation as the chest cavity fills up with blood. This often times is not a Dead Right There shot. Think of a bow hunter who’s arrow kills by cutting blood vessels so the animal bleeds out quickly. They run until they cannot get blood to pump any more, and their chest cavity fills up, and then they tip over.

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    Beach-gunner
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    Ted…..THANK YOU…….  I see the same reactions when I make the proper shot.  You going the extra mile to get the facts from a professional make this video more ligament and I give you a standing ovation for doing so.  I know you can’t see me but I am standing and clapping :)  I also appreciate the hours spent on this video and your professional nature.  When detractors or un-educated public approach us as being cruel to animals, we can direct them to this scientific evidence…..Very Well Done!!

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    UpTheHill
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    “BumbleB”Thanks for the education.

    Here is another question that myself and many others have wondered. When a deer, bear, moose or elk is heart shot, how in the hell do they take off sometimes for may yards? I have seen heart shot deer for over 80 yards!

    My guess would be adrenalin.
     

    
because they still have enough blood and oxygen / energy for their muscle to obey their brain (with it’s short supply of blood) to run a short distance before it runs out.

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    Ginuwine1969
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    Here is a question on this topic, if you head shoot a pigeon there is a bunch of flapping before it expires, same as the squirrel.  Now if you get a spinal chord / new shot bird goes down not movement at all why is that.  Disrupt the signals from the brain and the animal goes crazy, but cut the chord and the animal just lays down and dies whys is that?  The cord in most animal run from head to tail bone, so there are still plenty of synaptic nerves firing and releasing energy (stored potential) upon a neck shot, but no movement.  So my added take on the video would be with the sudden trauma to the brain, the brain stem must still be sending out white noise or garbage if you will, causing all that jerking and flapping.

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    Dan25
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    “Ginuwine1969”Here is a question on this topic, if you head shoot a pigeon there is a bunch of flapping before it expires, same as the squirrel.  Now if you get a spinal chord / new shot bird goes down not movement at all why is that.  Disrupt the signals from the brain and the animal goes crazy, but cut the chord and the animal just lays down and dies whys is that?  The cord in most animal run from head to tail bone, so there are still plenty of synaptic nerves firing and releasing energy (stored potential) upon a neck shot, but no movement.  So my added take on the video would be with the sudden trauma to the brain, the brain stem must still be sending out white noise or garbage if you will, causing all that jerking and flapping.

    RE the spinal shot and bird just falling over dead.  Ten years ago I fell about ten feet and crushed the L1 in my back.  Upon impact all I could feel was pain everywhere and could not see for a few seconds.  I knew I was hurt bad but could not tell where I was hurt because the pain was everywhere for a few seconds, not sure maybe a min. at the most.  The Dr. told me the reason was a sensory overload.  I think your bird shot is the same thing.  The central nervous system is overloaded by the shock of the injury while the damage done by the projectile causes death while the animal is immobilized.  Accordingly I try for headshots when at all possible.
     

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    Rchr
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    Ok, so at the very end, Ted begins to have a conversation with the doctor about the difference in the reaction of the animals that were shot through the vitals & dropped in their tracks without any reaction to the head shot ones. The Doctor says it’s interesting and it seems like the beginning of a new conversation and the video ends.
    So what happened with the rest of the conversation? 
    Grrat video by the way, but I kind of feel like I’m left hanging here waiting for more. I need more. ;)
    Thanks Ted appreciate your time & dedication. 

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    BumbleB
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    Agreed boys, isn’t it fascinating though?

    Personally if I was heart shot I do not believe that I would make it ten steps. God how I love to hunt and kill and then cook gourmet diners with my game :o)

    Us chaps are in a league of our own, party on!

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    SaltH2OSlick
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    I am a bow hunter as well as an airgunner… I have killed over 30 turkeys with my bow, the last dozen or so with a “broadhead” called the turkey guillotine… It has 4 blades that essentially make a 90 degree 4 way cross. The principle of the head is to neck-shoot the turkey severing it’s spinal cord/head… In every case, the successful shot just drops the turkey in its tracks… it lays stiff and dormant for a minute or 2, then slow and progressively the body begins wild twitching and reactions that actually get them airborne sometimes… It is very violent, but it never happens instantaneously. There’s always a delay… It is a good way to take them out with a bow because there’s no tracking needed, and you either miss cleanly or drop them DRT (well, after the flopping is over :)  )

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    Loki_762
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    Interesting. I was under the impression that a shot to the medulla, which controls involuntary actions such as breathing and heartbeat, would drop them dead with no twitching. Is this not the case, or is it just such a small target that it’s usually missed with a brain shot? Or is it just a myth? Regardless, Ted hits another home run with this video.
    Chris

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    ztirffritz
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    “Loki_762”Interesting. I was under the impression that a shot to the medulla, which controls involuntary actions such as breathing and heartbeat, would drop them dead with no twitching. Is this not the case, or is it just such a small target that it’s usually missed with a brain shot? Or is it just a myth? Regardless, Ted hits another home run with this video.
    Chris

    
What they indicated in the video is that the cells that control the twitch and flex response are actually lower down.  The brain’s function is to stop them from that reaction.  When you clip the brain it ceases to inhibit that reaction and they take off twitching and flexing in response until the O2 supply is depleted.  I’m sure it’s an evolutionary development that has proven useful against predators.  It’s an automatic response to pain or trauma that get’s them out of harm’s way.  It doesn’t work so well against lead though.

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