What's an appropriate # of airguns to own?

Forums General Discussion What's an appropriate # of airguns to own?

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    Pelletpushin
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    Tom your right for certain about a new one that out performs the last.
    I also know I shoot more often than most people as well and that everyone has a different #. I do need a big bore though but thats also not such a plinker so no big hurry on it.

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    chasdicapua
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    When my new gun out performs the older one, I sell the older one. Keeps the collection from getting out of hand!!

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    old20cal
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    how many?. well if ziabeam sells me the 103, I promise i’ll only buy one more if it is a 603. old20cal

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    old20cal
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    ps. also always as many as you can afford and or barter and trade for a couple more, But make sure they are old 20’s I like me Sheridan’s. ok benjamin’s too.

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    old20cal
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    0k in a nutshell. Never enuff. Buy gather collect as many as u like. And when youn think you might have enuff. Start over and do it again. And then repeat. 0ld20cal

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    peterdulux
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    As many as you can hide from your wife. HA!!!

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    Pelletpushin
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    Lol my wife shoots with me….but for every new one for me there is a need for a new one for her as well it is a most excellent but expensive problem.

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    Dairyboy
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    I used to have quite a few PCPs all were mainly Benjamin’s, like Mrods and discos and a maximus. My problem was I seemed to have them apart more tinkering than I ever did shoot them. So whatever free time I had I wasn’t shooting but tinkering and that’s not what I wanted to do anymore. Decided to have one PCP each in .177, .22, .25 and maybe a .30. So most got sold and had a .177 BSA R10, a .22 mutant standard, my .25 regulated Mrod and then a Bwalton tuned BT65 .30. All shot very well and extremely accurate but still just was too much. All were sold but the Mrod. Now I only have the Mrod and a RAW .30 PCP rifle wise. The Mrod is for sale and ordered another RAW in .25. PCP I decided quality over quantity. I have also gotten back into springers and started pistols. However went cheaper on them all. Got a full tuned XS46U in .177 from Flying Dragon, a Beeman P17 both open sight, deadly accurate and fun to shoot and today should be getting my PP700S-A in .177 which will be my last gun. So after having owned more than 10 at one time have decided just way too much for me and am now down to 5 and I’m done!

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    Goodtogo
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    My number of rifles don’t scare me………….Its all of the scopes that  I have that is scary. ;)

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    LIVIT
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    As many as you can afford and take care of.

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    Smaug
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    7. (I’m not going to waffle around, like some of you characters. :) )

    My 7 looks something like this:

    1. CO2 pistol
    2. Other pistol (single stroke pneumatic, in my case)
    3. Low power rifle (0-8 FPE)
    4. Mid-power springer (I like mid power, about 14 FPE)
    5. PCP rifle
    6. Wild card 1
    7. Wild card 2

    Others may be more focused, maybe they only want to ever shoot field target or they’re totally uninterested in pistols. They may only need or want one or two rifles, and they’ll happily spend as much on those two and their scopes as I’d spend on my 7.

    For those interested, here’s my current collection, and the current thinking on each of them. If I move the underlined ones, I’m down to 8; gotta trim two more to get down to where “I should be.”

    1. ​.177 Brocock Compatto: All-around PCP. Plinking, pesting, hunting and possibly field target gun in the future. A great all-around PCP.
    2. .22 Hammerli 850 Air Magnum (HPA converted): High power pester/hunter and longer range target gun.
    3. .177 Air Arms TX200, tuned: Field target gun PCP-accurate, but really heavy.
    4. .22 Benjamin Summit NP2: Bought this to tip my toe in .22. Powerful and quiet, but challenging to shoot. More fun than it should be, considering how hard it is to shoot well. :)
    5. .177 Weihrauch HW30s, home-tuned: A fun plinker and target gun. Quiet, accurate, easy-to-cock. Works on small pests too.
    6. Daisy 953: A single stroke pneumatic 10m target rifle. Fun, but I could probably go without this one, since it’s about the same effort to cock/pump as the HW30s and no more accurate. and a lot less powerful. Worse trigger too.
    7. Daisy PowerLine 1200 CO2 BB pistol: I keep this because it reminds me of my grandpa. It’s not that great of gun, but feels great in the hand and brings me back to the happiest times of my youth. Keeps Pop alive in my heart.
    8. Crosman 357: What a fun gun to shoot. Not that accurate in the whole scheme of things, but quite accurate for a replica CO2 pistol repeater.
    9. Crosman 2300T: single shot CO2 target pistol. Nice, but I could do without this.
    10. Crosman 1377: multip pump pistol carbine/pistol – I could do without this one, I’m not big on multi-pumps any more
    11. Daisy 747: single pump target pistol. Really nice pistol. Not as powerful as the 2300T, but just as accurate at 10m
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    williamw545
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    At least one of each 🙂

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    _Axel_
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    Perfect topic for a thread, since there is no one right answer!

    It’s about personality this, some like quality over quantity, I´m more of a quality kind of a guy. I started this hobby in my teens way back in the mid 80s. I´ve had a few different airguns over the years. But mostly its been pistols, since I find them very practical. They can be enjoyed at short distances and are easy to bring to places where you can shoot. My all time favorite is the Webley Tempest, perhaps mostly for sentimental reasons (I´ve had a few). I also have a Beeman P2 and HW45. Last decade I bought my first match pistol, a FWB 102. But it did not do any good for my elbow when I cocked it. So it was sold and a Tau 7 added, now this is a sweet gun! And really cheap here in Sweden (as is FWB´s). My Tau is a keeper! I also have a RWS 6M, but it is just a collectors piece for me (nearly mint), it does not fit my hand at all. I´m very intrigued by the recoilless action though! And then there´s a few project guns laying around; an old Premier (maybe a future favorite), RWS 5, Walther LP3 …

    I like my Tau and Webley the most, they are both perfect for what they were meant to be, match shooting and plinking respectively..

    I like rifles just too. On had is a FWB300s (It´s my all time favorite airgun of all) and a AA TX200. And of course my old Webley Tracker in .22 (5.6mm). It is hard to find ammo for it that fits the old British .22 bore, but I´ll hang on to it as it is still legal to own w/o a permit, due to the “grandfather law”. And it is a good gun for what it is, even though it is very ‘old school’.

    Personally I feel I have too many pistols, most see very little use. But selling them would not make me rich… I Would like to add a few rifles though. A HW30 and a couple of PCPs would be useful, one high power and one for FT type plinking.

    So in summary three rifles and three pistols would feel OK as a bare minimum, five or six each much better! I prefer mid range optics like Burris, Weaver and Leupold, I find decent optics to be a large part of the enjoyment. And that brings down the number of guns I will own due to cost. I´m actually very happy as it is now!

     

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    Pelletpushin
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    Thanks man! I was trying for a good topic plus looking for ideas and input from others who no doubt have faced the same question. I’m sure you’ve looked at the idea but my thought on the 5.6mm/British .22 is a pellet mold. If you can’t find one take the pellet that shoots the best to a factory and you can pay them to make a aluminum mold to pour pellets. Call around maybe even out of your area. Thought #2 take a small chunk of steel drill it out just a bit nice little dimple or dent. Put a normal .22 pellet head down in the dimple use a dowel rod or something inside the skirt and give it a lil tap with a light hammer. Then check head size with a micrometer. The skirt can be flared easily. Its a little work but hey so is a hand pump for a pcp. In the end it can still be worth it. Plus, once you get your resizing method down you can bang out a tin watching tv. Hope one of these is a new thought for you.

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    El_Teacher
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    ONE FOR EACH CALIBER  I THINK

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    Bobbed06
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    I never let a hobby spiral to the point of being a hoard.

    I only have 2 pellet rifles. I had 3 and sold 2, replaced one of those and arrived at 2.

    The 2 I have are BOTH Crosman Nitro Venom Dusk, 177 and 22 cal. I find that its easier to practice proper form and muscle memory with the same rifles.

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    fr8rbum747
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    I refuse to set a maximum number..I do have some heirloom models that will always be there…to date there are 48 long guns and bull pup mix.  A bunch of 2240’s, a couple of 2300 T’s and assorted neuvo look a likes that are CO2.  Somewhere I have some really old Luger CO2’s I got from my Grandfather’s collection.  A couple Crosman 600’s that are still fun to shoot.  I converted a bed room to a gun room next to my reloading equipment for my powder burners.  I do not think we should ever limit our acquisition of firearms or air guns if that is what makes us happy…It is kind of like how many Fly Rods should a person own?  There is no definitive answer…just enjoy them.
    Some day someone with have to deal with what I have, but not in my lifetime. 

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    Smaug
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    “Bobbed06”I never let a hobby spiral to the point of being a hoard.

    I only have 2 pellet rifles. I had 3 and sold 2, replaced one of those and arrived at 2.

    The 2 I have are BOTH Crosman Nitro Venom Dusk, 177 and 22 cal. I find that its easier to practice proper form and muscle memory with the same rifles.

    
That’s admirable restraint, but also very limiting.

    No pistols? No pneumatics?

    Hats off to you.

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    _Axel_
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    “Bobbed06”I never let a hobby spiral to the point of being a hoard.

    I only have 2 pellet rifles. I had 3 and sold 2, replaced one of those and arrived at 2.

    The 2 I have are BOTH Crosman Nitro Venom Dusk, 177 and 22 cal. I find that its easier to practice proper form and muscle memory with the same rifles.

    
Well two famous quotes come to mind: “beware of the man with only one gun – he´s likely to know how to use it” and “Not wanting is as good as having”.

    One well known gunsmith in Sweden (now retired) had only two guns, one ought-six HVA 1900 and a SbS Webley Shotgun (If memory serves). In his business he taught wingshooting and told everyone that one can only become really good if one sticks to one gun (he seems to have detested combination guns, and Sweden in ‘Drilling territory’). I never met him, but read about him in the local hunting mags. It is a minority point of view I have a lot of respect for, because he´s right, although I´m not sure I could stand the cravings myself!

    And then we have our local and (well known on the web) airgun expert, Johnny Ottosson, who also is a proponent of asceticism in his shooting life.

     

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    torgo
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    I find my numbers shift as my interest into different types of airguns changes.  Right now I am buying more PCP airguns and am thinking of thinning some of the springers.  But I do like to have a balanced number of each caliber.

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