Washington State Collared Dove Hunting

Forums Hunting Washington State Collared Dove Hunting

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    Jim81
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    I live on a 15 acre farm surrounded by commercial forest property. My neighbor detests me shooting Collared Doves and has threatened to notify the game department enforcement. I researched the laws in this state and even included a call and talked with an enforcement supervisor and now have invited the nosy neighbor to call enforcement soon and often.
    In this state the Collared Dove is considered an invasive species. They can be taken year around and no limit. There is a slight catch. Even though it is not a game bird one still has to have a small game license. That’s $40 here.
    I have gotten some decoys and of course the neighbor complained about that also. I also asked the enforcement supervisor about that. He had also wondered about decoys and contacted the Federal enforcement folks. According to the supervisor one can use decoys for Collared Doves and use bait (scratch corn) as an additional attractor. Be sure to check the laws in your own state. It only takes about an hour and it may be vastly different than in this state.
    I have been putting scratch out and started just 5 days ago. It really seems to work and is low cost at a feed store.  I now have band tailed pigeons and doves coming to the corn every morning. The band tailed pigeon is a game bird so I have to be able to know the difference between Rock Doves (common park pigeon), Collared Doves, and Morning Doves which are another game bird and can be taken during a hunting season. We don’t see many morning doves anymore thanks to the Collared Dove.
    It would be interesting to compare Washington’s laws with other states where air gunners are after Collared Doves.

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    hawkeye69
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    Collared doves are considered an invasive species here in Arizona too and can be taken in any number year around. Sorry to hear that you also have an PITA invasive neighbor.

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    JohnL57
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    Same here in California-open season all year, no bag limit. They make fine eating BTW.

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    Deleted Account

    Delaware, you can shoot rock doves, starlings and house sparrows year round, because they’re invasive. But what burns me up you can’t shoot collared doves yet, because they’re here in Delaware in such small numbers. So yeah, let’s wait till they drive out the mourning doves then open them up to year round hunting. SMH, because once they get a foothold the population will explode. 

    Jim81,sorry about your ignorant PITA neighbor. Have you tried explaining the negative impact of invasive species?  I’ve had quite a bit of success explaining the deleterious effects of non native invasive birds on native populations to concerned neighbors. 

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    Saltlake58
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    I believe Euro-Asian Collard Doves are considered invasive by the Feds nation wide.  Apparently, they only arrived on North American shores in the 1980’s or so through the Caribbean.  Since then, they’ve colonized everything in the United States except for a couple really cold locations.  Starlings are ugly, but these things have really taken over.  

    ​Do check local laws, but for most of us, they are considered invasive and to be taken as often as possible.  Good one!  Maybe you should help that nosey neighbor understand the damage the bird does and the natives it’s wiping out.  Maybe that’ll help him understand why we need to keep these things under control.  

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    T3PRanch
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    Since you mentioned mourning doves it should be noted that mourning dove cannot be taken by pellet gun since it is a federal migratory game bird. I believe that this rule applies to all states. 

    Thurmond

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    Saltlake58
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    Thurmond – you do bring up an excellent point.  Always know the quarry, and how to take it legally!  Know the differences between Collard Doves and Mourning Doves in this case.  Starlings are easy, House Sparrows are everywhere.  Pigeons are right up there as well.

    The House Sparrow is, I believe, considered the most invasive bird in the North America, so can, in most jurisdictions, be taken by whatever means you wish.

    Also, to correct my previous entry, it’s the Eurasian Collard Dove. They move fast.  According to the Wikipedia article, “In 1974, fewer than 50 Eurasian Collared Doves escaped captivity in Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas”.  Wow! In the early 1980’s the doves made it to Florida, and in 40 years, colonized the rest of the possible range in North America.  Armadillos didn’t move that fast from Central America up through Texas and Mississippi!

    These invasive species can move FAST!

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    Deleted Account

    But not as fast as pellets. 

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    markT
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    Good info.. 
    neighbors.. man that stinks for you.. I’d have the game warden over and have a conversation right in front of that neighbor..”green jeans” will tell him straight up, you’re legal..
    we have a rule that all game must be “killed” on you own property and if it travels ( Flys) to the neighbors property they can get you for tresspass if you go after it. . And if you don’t go after the downed game, it’s wanton waste..
    good luck kill ’em all..    
     

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    badammo
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    They make wonderful pies and marinared in Italian dressing and barbecued. Everyone that trys them wants more. 

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    Saltlake58
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    Ya know, most airgunners that hunt, take vermin which are considered non-edible, but –

    ​Some take animals considered edible such as Collard Doves, rabbits and Squirrels.  

    Perhaps we should start a cooking thread that goes along side PCP Airguns and Hunting???

    ​I for one don’t know how to cook these small game animals, and I’m sure many fit that category.  Perhaps some are willing to learn and expand what to do with the critters after the hunt??

    ​HHHHHMMMMMMMM……………….

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    JohnL57
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    “Saltlake58”Ya know, most airgunners that hunt, take vermin which are considered non-edible, but –
    ​Some take animals considered edible such as Collard Doves, rabbits and Squirrels.  
    Perhaps we should start a cooking thread that goes along side PCP Airguns and Hunting???
    ​I for one don’t know how to cook these small game animals, and I’m sure many fit that category.  Perhaps some are willing to learn and expand what to do with the critters after the hunt??
    ​HHHHHMMMMMMMM……………….

    
I like to filet the breasts, rub with olive oil, sprinkle salt and pepper and grill over a very slow fire. Youtube is your friend when it comes to how to clean game.

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    Saltlake58
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    No fair. Now I am hungry and its only 7:30 in the morning!

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    Wadcutter
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    “T3PRanch”Since you mentioned mourning doves it should be noted that mourning dove cannot be taken by pellet gun since it is a federal migratory game bird. I believe that this rule applies to all states. 
    Thurmond

    
To add to what T3PRanch wrote…
    Because of the dark cheek line on the White-Winged Dove, also federally protected, it is often mistaken for the invasive Eurasian Collared Dove. Don’t know if you have that species in your area, but if your neighbor is itching to turn you in for something you may want to know the subtle differences between the two.
    Links below may be of help.
    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Eurasian_Collared-Dove/id
    https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/White-winged_Dove/id

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    Deleted Account

    Wadcutter, that’s great information you provided on those two doves. It’s so important that we air gunners know what we are shooting at and killing. We don’t need any PITA’s drawing unwanted attention to us, by us doing something wrong by accident or on purpose. 

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    Saltlake58
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    Wadcutter – fully agree on accurate identification of game is a must!  Responsible hunting means we know and understand nature rather than just shooting anything that moves.  We take invasive animals when possible and follow all game laws accurately and completely.  

    I don’t hunt much anymore, but do intend to start taking invasives when the opportunity presents itself.  So, if there’s any chance of mistakes, I need to understand and prevent rather than learn at the pointed finger of a game warden.

    Good stuff!

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    Saltlake58
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    Oh, and I found this graphic on the Eurasian Collard Dove, No, it doesn’t move faster than pellets  :)  but it migrates and spreads like rats with wings!

    So, in 15 years, it basically colonized the entire United States and large sections of Canada and Mexico.  YIPES!  We need to be very careful with animals that could get out and do this.  Devastating to local indigenous populations!

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    Deleted Account

    True that Saltlake!  Invasives are devestaring to indigenous wildlife. Thanks for the map…wow, that sucks how fast Eurasian collared doves have spread. Hawkeye does his part!

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    Bob_O
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    “hawkeye69”Collared doves are considered an invasive species here in Arizona too and can be taken in any number year around. Sorry to hear that you also have an PITA invasive neighbor.

    
Invasive neighbor……that’s a good one!!!

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    JimNM
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    Invite the nosy SOB over for dinner and serve him some Collared Dove.  Let him see that you are using what you shoot.  Probably wont change his mind – but you will have done your best effort.

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