Tuxing double cylinder pcp air compressor – taking the plunge.

Forums Air Tanks, Pumps, Compressors, & Filters Tuxing double cylinder pcp air compressor – taking the plunge.

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    Centercut
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    I’ve got about 5 hours run time on mine and everything still looks and works fine. That’s about 20 to 25 top offs of 88 cubic foot SCBA tank from 3000 to 4500 psi. Seems like it will go much longer without issues. 

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    MaxKookage
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    How has this pump been holding up and how loud is it with the garage closed and it pumping away in the corner?

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    Centercut
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    @maxkookage, I currently have about 6.5 hours run time on this and it still works great. Just topped off  44cu ft and 77cu ft tanks this past weekend. It’s about time the change the oil, starting to get a bit dark. Going to do that now and every 5 hours run time in the future. Also going to disassemble the gold filter/dryer and change out the Zeolite and cotton tampons, plus the small one in the outlet block. Will post once done with how things look including photos. Not too loud but don’t run it in enclosed space  

    Mike

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    MaxKookage
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    I'm thinking about pulling the trigger on the TXED012 too. I won't go nuts like you did though. Setting up a water container won't bother me too much at first).

    If you had it to do again. 

    Would you?

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    Centercut
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    Yes, I would, because I learned so much about compressors, cooling systems, dryers, filters, etc.  However, if it breaks and I can’t fix it I’ll buy the 110vac Daystate compressor. 

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    tibor
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    Centercut

      However, if it breaks and I can’t fix it I’ll buy the 110vac Daystate compressor. 

    this answers alot…thanks

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    mr.grimm
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    I also have a Tuxing Double cylinder compressor. It is a great compressor for the money. Some extra bells and whistles on Air Venturi and the new Hatsan but basicly the same compressor at over double the price. You will have to add extra moisture filtration to all of them. I agree with Centercut on the Daystate. If you have the money to spend get the Daystate. If you are on a budget get the Tuxing and and bigger gold moisture separator along with the "Gold filter" you can fill with molecular sieve. I use a bucket for the cooling and it is not a hassle. Main thing is to use synthetic compressor oil.

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    Centercut
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    Removed and disassembled the "gold" filter after 7.5 hours run time. The inlet cotton tampon was dirty, but the outlet one was clean. Most of the color changing silica that I had "salted" into the Zeolite had changed from orange to dark green. The inner part of the cylinder was clean and looked like new. Based on this data, I recommend checking your "gold" filter once every 5 hours run time if you have a fast compressor like the Tuxing two cylinder, AV, or Hatsan.  I think with the slower AC you could get away with once every ten hours. 

    I had earlier reported a problem with the compressor.  Turns out the power strip was defective. I bypassed it with a heavier 14 gauge power cable and everything works fine.

    Photos of: Inlet, "salted" Zeolite, filter components, inner cylinder, and inlet/outlet cotton tampon filters.

     

     

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    mr.grimm
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    So Centercut are you not using the PVC liner in the gold filter? Was thinking of taking the liner out of my filter when I change out the Zeolite.

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    Eaglebeak
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    Thanks for the update,Mike. I've been waiting for a low humidity day to change mine. Mine has done a lot more hours than yours but most of those were using an Altaros booster (very slow). I guess that it probably has passed about half the air that yours has. You certainly have busted the myth about acid leaching. Are you using the small O.E. tampon filter on the inlet side? I am finding that it is catching most of the oil vapour.

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    Centercut
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    @mr.grimm, nope, just a 2” cotton tampon on each end sandwiched by Zeolite salted with color changing silica beads. As you can see from the photos there was no degradation of the cylinder, threads or end caps. I’d recommend going with 3 inches on inlet and 1 inch on outlet of the cotton tampon. 

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    Centercut
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    @eaglebeak, no, just the gold filter as described above. Notice on the photo of inlet and outlet filters that only the first inch of the inlet is dirty. The remainder is clean as is the entire outlet filter. 

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    USAFANG67
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    Centercut

    Notes, links for materials, operating suggestions and parts list for Tuxing Compressor modifications and upgrades.  https://www.dropbox.com/s/jphetyn7m3i8n92/Tuxing%20HPAC%20project%20pdf.pdf?dl=0

    Hi Joe,

    Many thanks for the materials and parts list. Much appreciated.

    Which gauges did you use to monitor pressure on your gold filters?

    I didn't see them on your list unless I overlooked it.

    Thanks!

    Matt

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    Centercut
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    I actually used a pressure gage on the outlet of the gold filter like this one:

    But only because I had a spare one lying in my tool box. It isn't necessary, since you have the gauge on top of the Compressor, and also when you fill the tanks you have the gage on the fill rig. An extra gauge isn't necessary. Same goes for a vent valve at the inlet to the gold filter. Totally redundant. As long as you keep the inlet to the gold filter above the outlet of the compressor outlet block (where the compressor vent valve is located), you're venting the same volume.  Hope my rambling makes sense?

    Mike – not Joe…  ;)

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    USAFANG67
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    My apology Mike 🙂

    I'm glad I didn't call you some of the things I call myself when I mess up 🙂

    Appreciate your take on the gauge of not being necessary.

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    steve-l
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    I just bought one of these two cylinder Tuxing compressors from China as a back up to my Bauer. I think it is important to know what this compressor does not have.  There is  no over pressure relief valve. There are no filters or water condensers. It is simply a high pressure pump. It is NOT a back up to my Bauer as it is delivered. It has a mickey mouse water pump that is supposed to be used with a bucket of water to keep this thing cool. It doesn't even come with lube oil.

    High pressure air is very serious business. This is NOT safe to use as delivered. It can be used as delivered, but it should not be. Please note that I have not criticized the compressor. At this point, that would be secondary.  What needs to be done in my opinion at a minimum to be useable is below.

    1) Inlet air filter

    2) Over pressure mechanical relief valve.

    3) Replace the high pressure inter-cylinder air line with a multi-coil tube and a cooling fan for it.

    4) Replace the mickey mouse water pump with a TIG welding torch cooling unit filled with 50/50 anti-freeze and water mix.

    5) The addition of a final stage water air separator and filter.

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    Centercut
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    @steve-l, I think you forgot a few items…

    – install auto purge valve

    – install PMV

    – electrically ground the system since it is delivered ungrounded

    – replace cheap piston rod journal bearings with roller bearings

    – replace direct drive with belt drive system

    oh, and last but not least, raise the price from $500 to $4200 so it can be more like a Bauer Junior II. 

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    steve-l
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    Thank you, I forgot about the ground issue. The others are nice to have, but I was not critiquing the pump. What I was stating is that the pump purchase  is not the end of the costs. Assuming the pump is good, it is not unreasonable to foresee an additional $700 to,$1,000 of investment before the system is really usable. I was not comparing this pump to my Bauer. They are not comparable. I bought my pump as a backup unit only and the pump as delivered is simply not ready for use out of the box. Which is pretty much what your experience is as well.

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    Centercut
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    In a way yes, but I put $250 into my initial $500 investment and it’s worked like a champ for over 8 months. All I’ve done is change the oil and filter media. So I’d say $700 to $1000 is a bit of a stretch. 

    – grounding the system – necessary

    – PMV, auto purge, coiled steel inter-stage tubing, roller bearings, belt drive – all unnecessary

    – inlet air filter, better water pump and relief valve – all nice to have but not essential. 

    You shouldn’t expect to pay $500 and get a new Bauer. You CAN pay $2000 and get a low end Coltri. 

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    steve-l
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    At the moment the only thing I've done with this compressor is look at it, but I really like the idea of using a welding torch cooler for the compressor. The size is perfect and everything the cooling system needs is integral with a torch cooler. They include an expansion tank, a radiator, radiator fan and an integral pump. Typically these coolers employ quick disconnect water line fittings that are readily available from any welding supply store. Typically they are physically small, lightweight. and not expensive. It's use would allow the use of distilled water and anti-freeze for corrosion purposes as well. I just checked on eBay and a 10 liter cooler cost about $350 and weighs less than 40 lbs. See:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/PowerCool-w300-110-Volt-TIG-Welder-Torch-Water-Cooling-System-Cooler-by-Vevor/232879045200?epid=24017349503&hash=item3638ac3a50#shpCntId#shId

    The addition of coiled tubing for inter-stage coupling and a small fan is very inexpensive (say about $30) and will greatly increase the compressor efficiency and probably pay for itself in electricity savings in the first year.

    As stated before, high pressure air is very dangerous and safety is paramount. Incorporating a mechanical relief valve is easy by drilling and tapping a 1\4" BSPP port in the output block. I just bought an adjustable one between 3000 and 6000 PSI for $80. Cheap insurance!

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