Tuxing double cylinder pcp air compressor – taking the plunge.

Forums Air Tanks, Pumps, Compressors, & Filters Tuxing double cylinder pcp air compressor – taking the plunge.

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    Centercut
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    OK guys, I’m taking one for the team. ;)  I’m buying the “Tuxing adjustable auto stop double cylinder PCP air compressor for air rifles 4500psi”, model TXED012 in 110vac. I have a quote on eBay for $555, the price that shows on eBay is $579. I do not intend to use the “bucket” method of cooling but to install a water tank/pump/radiator system very similar to the AV compressor, and to also use a filter with the 13X molecular sieve. My goal is to do this for under $750 total. I may be delusional, but I “think” I can get essentially the same compressor as the AV for a few hundred dollars saved ($550). I will keep this topic open and updated as things progress with photos and numbers. Here is the link to the eBay compressor, with some photos. It might be a couple weeks until my next post since I’m not sure how long it will take to be shipped to San Diego from China.

    http://r.ebay.com/whLMp5



     

     

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    JimNM
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    Cool!  Please post links for other add-on stuff you use.

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    Centercut
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    Will do. I plan on posting as I make the modifications. First I will set it up with bucket and break it in, run it for ten minutes unloaded, then fill a tank from 3000 to 4500. I will change the oil after that, and start with the cooling modifications. Once that is done I will add the Molecular Sieve filter. All components and prices with links will be posted so that anyone that wants to can do the same thing (after mine works – hopefully). I will post detailed photos also, and times for filling various scenarios. Latest status:

    11/17/2017: Estimated delivery Friday, Nov 24, 2017 Friday, Dec 1, 2017 to San Diego, CA.  92009

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    spysir
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    Thanks for spending your money, look forward to a full review as time goes along.
    Any chance you are trying ( have tried ?) the under $100.00 filter housing often sold along with these? I’ve seen a few folks post “there are the same as xxx” however none of those people seemed very safety oriented.
     No matter,  run the thing till the wheels fall off, for us, darn   airguners are the best.

    TIA

    John 

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    Deja
    Spectator
    Spectator

    yes nice! i was asking about this comressor the other week. Since we euros dont have the air venturi version this is what we have acess too. keep us informed please.

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    tonyv138
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    For what its worth, i was considering the same compressor on Aliexpress from  a Tuxing store…. contacted the vendor with a few questions, here is the info, just in case you have not seen yet….

    and that was pretty quick response. question at 11 or so CST, answered by 6:00 am

     

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    mclecato
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    Centercut
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    Thanks. Mine is supposed to be delivered in one to two weeks. When you run it with the bucket for cooling, what is the normal temperature that you reach on the compressor?  Also, does the cooling water input go into the high pressure cylinder first, then the low pressure (left) cylinder?
    Mike

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    mclecato
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    I connected mine to the low pressure first (left),  when I connect to the directly to the home water 35°C.

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    Centercut
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    Mclecato, I’m pretty sure that the cooling water flow on both the Air Venturi and Alpha Carette goes to the high pressure cylinder first and then the low pressure cylinder. These two compressors are both based on the same style compressor as the Tuxing, except the AC is belt drive while the AV is direct drive. 

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    Centercut
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    Flow diagram for cooling system modifications to the Tuxing two cylinder HPAC.


    I am going to modify the flow path to have the flow go from tank to pump to HP cylinder to LP cylinder to radiator back to tank, based on further analysis and input from Thurmond at T3PRanch.  Thanks Thurmond!  +1 accuracy.

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    Centercut
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    Good news, and bad news… I’ve come up with BASIC and DELUXE versions of my modifications. I have cost estimated both, including all the components necessary, including cooling, air drying, and electrical.

    The BASIC system configuration comes in at $186, for a total cost of $741. This is very close to my initial estimate and goal of $750 as you can see on my first post (good news).

    The DELUXE configuration comes in at $302, for a total cost of $857, which is $107 over my initial estimate (bad news). For this version (which is the one I’ve ordered the components for and will be building), it includes an aluminum tank, tank cooling, flow meter, remote tank temperature monitoring, surge tank, increased capacity pump, 20 amp switched power strip, and 5 amp 115vac to 12vdc converter. I kinda went overboard designing and ordering parts…  ;) 

    I am using the same flow path, same water tank volume, and same radiator/fans for both configurations. So, although I’m building the DELUXE version, I’m pretty certain the BASIC version will work just fine. Once built, I’ll run the system to get cylinder head temperature, water tank temperature, times to top off from 3000 to 4500 on an 88 cubic feet tank, etc.

    More to follow once I receive everything from Amazon and eBay. 

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    Centercut
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    Numbers. Slightly different than above. Its OK if you’re eyes glaze over reading this…  ;)

    Parts list for Tuxing two cylinder HPAC modifications.
    Initial cost, Tuxing HPAC with adjustable auto stop – $555

    BASIC upgrades-
    Filtering upgrade :

    1. Molecular Sieve Filter – $70
    2. Zeolite 13X molecular sieve media – $15
    3. Brackets for filter body, using hose clamps with channel rubber – $2
    4. 4500 psi Fill hoses with fittings – came with Filter housing
    5. Total – $87

    Cooling System mods:

    1. Radiator (360mm)- $28
    2. Cooling fans (3, 120mm) – $10
    3. Water tank, plastic, 5 liter capacity – $12
    4. Radiator mounting brackets – $10
    5. Additional 3/8” Tygon type tubing – $9
    6. Fittings for tank and system – $5
    7. Total – $74

    Electrical system mods:

    1. 115vac to 12vdc converter for fans – $4
    2. 15 amp basic switchable power strip – $5
    3. Wiring and connectors – $4
    4. Wiring guides – $3
    5. Zip Ties, various sizes – $3
    6. Total – $14
      Total mod cost: $180
      Total cost including compressor is $735.

    DELUXE upgrades (probably “over” engineered)
    Filtering upgrade (same as BASIC):

    1. Molecular Sieve Filter – $70
    2. Zeolite 13X molecular sieve media – $15
    3. Brackets for filter body, using hose clamps with channel rubber – $2
    4. 4500 psi Fill hoses with fittings – came with Filter housing
    5. Total – $87

    Cooling System mods:

    1. Radiator (360mm)- $28
    2. Cooling fans (3, 120mm) – $10
    3. Water pump, external, 1 gpm – $18
    4. Water tank, 4 liter capacity – $36
    5. Surge tank (1 liter) – $7
    6. Cooling fins for water tank, 2 – $9
    7. Thermal conductive pads, 2 – $2
    8. Surface mount Thermometer for water tank – $4
    9. Additional 3/8” Tygon type tubing – $9
    10. Radiator mounting brackets. – $10
    11. Thermocouple for water tank – $2
    12. Flow meter with fittings – $5
    13. Fittings for tank and system, L fittings and straight fittings – $15
    14. Total – $155

    Electrical system mods:

    1. 115vac to 12vdc converter for water pump and fans – $9
    2. Wiring and connectors – $4
    3. Wiring guides – $3
    4. Run time hour meter, vibration – $17
    5. 20 amp switchable power strip – $24
    6. Zip Ties, various sizes – $3
    7. Total – $60
      Total mod cost: $302
      Total cost including compressor is $857.

    BASIC Configuration explanation, compared to DELUXE:

    1. Cooling system uses a 5 liter plastic container vice the aluminum tank, cost is approx. $12. Also, it uses the pump and tubing that came with the compressor and uses it as a sump pump in the plastic tank vice the stand-alone 1 gpm pump. Surge tank also not required. So these three items save $49 by replacing the aluminum tank and external pump.
    2. The fans draw very little current, so since the water pump that comes with the compressor is 115vac, we only need a small 115vac to 12vdc “wall wart” to power the fans, and cost is approx. $4. And, we don’t need the 20 amp power strip if we plug the compressor into wall socket, and water pump and fans (wall wart) into “cheap” switchable power strip. Run time meter is not necessary. This saves $45.
    3. Cooling fins for tank, flow meter, thermal pads, surface mount thermometer and thermocouple are not necessary. Saves $17.

    FYI, the BASIC system is much closer to both the AV and AC systems. Yes, the Tuxing doesn’t have the high pressure outlet cooling coils of the AV, or the belt drive of the AC, but its very close in design of cooling system and actual compressor mechanics. Neither AV nor AC come with a molecular sieve filter, unless I’m mistaken.

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    splicerx
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    Let us know how it does CC.

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    T3PRanch
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    Why 13X molecular sieve rather than 3A or even Activated Alumina?

    Thurmond

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    Centercut
    Participant
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    Well, I could say because that’s what Joe B recommends. But I did some research and that’s what dive shops use in their filtration towers for moisture removal. Additionally, it has approx a 10 Angstrom pore diameter compared to 3A, 4A, or 5A which makes it more suitable for trapping water molecules. 

    Now for the science speak…

    Molecular Sieve 13X  is a multiple purpose, highly porous, high capacity alkali metal alumino-silicate in the spherical form. It is the sodium form of the Type X crystal structure with pore diameters of approximately 10Å. It can adsorb all molecules that can be adsorbed by 3A4A, and 5A molecular sieve. Type 13X molecular sieve can also adsorb molecules such as aromatics and branched-chain hydrocarbons, which have large critical diameters

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    Eaglebeak
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    Thanks for the description of this stuff, Centercut. My Tuxing filter arrived today and I’m going to fill it with 13x and a little bit of orange silica gel. I read somewhere that the filter should be mounted vertically with the inlet on the bottom. Do you have any dope on whether this is important or not?There is a lot of over the top theories about the usefulness of this type of dryer on this forum but I think it will work just fine, especially on a slow-fill system like my Altaros booster pump.

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    Centercut
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    Yours should work just fine. Cut your included tampon into 1.5 inch pieces and use one at each end between the Zeolite. Ensure that you fill enough so that screwing on the end cap gives you at least an inch of compression. Keep a track of your run time and check it every 10 to 15 hours. And yes, vertically is preferred but not critical. 

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    T3PRanch
    Participant
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    “Centercut”Well, I could say because that’s what Joe B recommends. But I did some research and that’s what dive shops use in their filtration towers for moisture removal. Additionally, it has approx a 10 Angstrom pore diameter compared to 3A, 4A, or 5A which makes it more suitable for trapping water molecules. 

    Now for the science speak…

    Molecular Sieve 13X  is a multiple purpose, highly porous, high capacity alkali metal alumino-silicate in the spherical form. It is the sodium form of the Type X crystal structure with pore diameters of approximately 10Å. It can adsorb all molecules that can be adsorbed by 3A4A, and 5A molecular sieve. Type 13X molecular sieve can also adsorb molecules such as aromatics and branched-chain hydrocarbons, which have large critical diameters

    
The “problem” with alkali metal alumino-silicate is the alkali portion which WILL break down producing corrosive components which is why JoeB harps about contact between bare aluminum and the media. A better choice IMHO is Activated Alumina which does not produce the corrosive component at all. I have tried to get JoeB to acknowledge this but he remains mute on the subject as I suspect he is sitting on a very large stock of his chosen media. Here is a link to the Activated Alumina:
    http://www.compressedairdesiccant.com/desiccant/activated-alumina/activated-alumina-desiccant-1-8-inch-50-lb-bag.html

    Thurmond  

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    Centercut
    Participant
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    Thanks Thurmond. Can we agree to disagree? I have searched and searched for a reference that says that the Zeolite breaks down and forms some sort of corrosive when exposed to water molecules.  I can’t find any, so if you could link to a reference, other than “Joe B says”, I’d appreciate it.  I’m a Nuclear Engineer by trade, and we deal in absolutes. No reference, no truth.  ;)  Additionally, the aluminum in the Tuxing type filter is anodized to limit or minimize corrosion. The purpose of anodizing is to form a layer of aluminum oxide that will protect the aluminum beneath it. The aluminum oxide layer has a much higher corrosion and abrasion resistance than aluminum. So as long as the user uses common sense practices by inspecting his filter body, caps, and threads when checking the Zeolite every ten or fifteen operational hours, it should be safe. Obviously if corrosion is seen on this inspection it would be smart to remove the filter from service… I’m fine with the activated alumina also, its just not as effective as the 13X molecular sieve. Also remember that the activated alumina loses effectiveness as temperature approaches 200 deg. F, and these Chinese compressors, Tuxing, AV, AC all run pretty hot and the compressed air exiting the compressor gets fairly hot also. 
    Mike

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