TORQUEING STOCK SCREWS

Forums General Discussion TORQUEING STOCK SCREWS

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    mrjohns
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    When I was shooting rimfire rifles,  I torqued my stocks screws to increase accuracy.  I did this to my Anschutz, MY CZ 452 , and my Cooper JSR.   Have any of you torqued the screws on your air rifle, to increase accuracy? I know air guns are a different animal, but I live to get any gun I own, to shoot as accurate as I can get it to.   If any of you have torqued the stock, what were your results.  

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    zebra
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    Not sure I would claim to have torqued them but I have adjusted my stock screws to the point where they effect accuracy the least. There is a definite poi shift when they are too tight or too loose.

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    Goodtogo
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    I always torque mine but today “finally” figured out why my TX200 stock screw that screws into the screw that holds the trigger group and spring in the airgun tube was always needing to be tightened up. It was the screw that holds the trigger group in that was backing out, and not the trigger guard screw which holds the stock also. It didn’t take much there to cause the rifle to vertical string a group of shots. It seems simple but I just thought the walnut was a little unstable.

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    John_in_Ma
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    on a springer using metal cups and posting the back screw is the way to go, that way you’re not always having to tighten the screws as the wood compresses. Also the use of blue loc-tite or vibra-tite are essential to keep them from backing out. On a pcp there are factory torque specs for every screw and they should be followed as over torquing of steel screws into what are mostly aluminum and brass will cause fatigue and eventual failure of the threads. I know as I had to have my breech drilled, tapped and rethreaded for a couple of screws from over torquing that lead to stripping. Over torquing the one, or two stock screws on a pcp, or springer can cause temperature induced shifts. This is because parts of airtube, or valve body ect are now binding against each other or the stock. I hope this helps.

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    Verve
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    Have had the same question knocking about for some time. Do air rifle factories actually have the torque settings as I’ve yet to see any in the manuals etc? And I’ve not seen any tuners videos with torque wrenches used.

    Or in this industry it’s the way of the loctite?

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    airborne
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    What tool are you guys using to do your torquing?? I bought a Wheeler and it works great. I just like to hear about other ones or brands as I am a tool buff

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    zebra
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    I do it without any equipment. I just tighten it until it doesn’t have any movement. I like to use as little torque as possible because it doesn’t take much to shift the poi. 

     I gained some noticeable accuracy in some of my air guns by loosening the stock screws a quarter to a half turn from where they were when I got them.

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    mrjohns
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    airborne, I use the Weaver torque wrench.  I think it is just like the Wheeler, but a different color. 

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