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Forums PCP Airguns ¡¡¡TAIPAN(s)!!!

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    Joekrooz
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    So you aren’t supposed to shoot the Vet in cold weather??  I never got a manual with my Vet. 

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    Matt247365
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    Joekrooz

    So you aren’t supposed to shoot the Vet in cold weather??  I never got a manual with my Vet.

     

    I've owned 5 vets.

    Bought 5, still own 3.

    I enjoy them in all kinds of weather 👍

    ::shrugs::

     

    Matt

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    elh0102
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    Joekrooz

    So you aren’t supposed to shoot the Vet in cold weather??  I never got a manual with my Vet. 

    I just saw that statement in the manual about the 5-41 C operating range which, I think is 41-104 F. That makes my list of one of the strangest things I've seen lately. Maybe it has to do with the properties of highly compressed air? I've certainly shot mine at temps under 41 F without giving it a thought. Maybe someone can explain, but it makes no sense to me. 

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    mtnGhost
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    Well in my case, it affected the triggers :)

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    mtnGhost
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    elh0102

    Joekrooz

    So you aren’t supposed to shoot the Vet in cold weather??  I never got a manual with my Vet. 

    I just saw that statement in the manual about the 5-41 C operating range which, I think is 41-104 F. That makes my list of one of the strangest things I've seen lately. Maybe it has to do with the properties of highly compressed air? I've certainly shot mine at temps under 41 F without giving it a thought. Maybe someone can explain, but it makes no sense to me. 

    One other possibility – Viton o-rings (even though I haven't found one in my Veteran yet despite claims that they're in there) stop sealing at mild temperatures. 

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    elh0102
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    May be, but I've had a bunch of PCP rifles with all kinds of O rings, and never had  a problem in cold weather. 

    Regarding trigger issues, I've done a little research into the metallurgy and molecular properties of steel at cold temps. My very basic understanding is consistent with my experience with a lot of triggers over 50 years. If a trigger is adjusted aggressively, meaning with minimal sear engagement and spring tension, cold temps can cause inconsistent performance and, in some cases, failure to maintain sear engagement; i.e., an unintentional discharge. With few exceptions,  I don't rely on safeties in rifles. Unlike shotguns, rifle triggers are, by nature, much more aggressively tuned, with a much smaller margin of safety. So, I rarely use them. I favor air rifles that have an anti-double load feature, so a pellet can be chambered with the rifle de-cocked, and then recocked without a second pellet chambered (Taipan Veteran and Daystate Red Wolf). As always, the best safety is the operator.

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    zx10wall
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    I totally agree @elh0102

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