Strelok Pro vs ChairGun

Forums General Discussion Strelok Pro vs ChairGun

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    bdzjlz
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    I purchased Strelok Pro about a week ago and after fumbling around for about 24 hours to figure out how to use it, I find it to be very accurate and a huge improvement over ChairGun. 

    The only feature I have not been able to get to work so far is the BC calculator.  I have tried everything I know to try.  I fill in the data and nothing happens.  If anyone has a fix for the, I would appreciate the tips.  

    Even with that, it is well worth the money.

     

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    spinj
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    I've never used Strelok Pro, just Chairgun; and I find it spot-on, provided that accurate data is inputted (and I'm a turret clicker).  Aside from the usual information like ballistic coefficient, zero distance, pellet weight, projectile type, muzzle velocity and zero-distance velocity, the most important is scope height.  I cannot speak for Strelok Pro, but Chairgun requires a certain way to measure scope height, which is perhaps different to that which Strelok permits.  This link takes you to the method to correctly obtain the true scope height between your scope and rifle's barrel: https://airgunaccuracy.wordpress.com/chairgun-and-scope-height/.

     

    Once the correct scope height value is obtained, another crucial measurement is needed to be entered, and that is the correct magnification setting on your scope so that the mildot spacing is true (if you are the type of shooter who will be using holdover and holdunder).  Don't be content on the magnification level your scope's manual states as being the true mildot setting as in almost all cases it isn't.  Note that even a couple of millimeters off from the true setting is enough to yield a big difference in POI from what Chairgun states relative to the actual POI of your pellet, even at a distance of just 25 yards.  To get the true mildot setting of your scope if you use an adjustable one, follow the directions that this link provides: https://www.anstonftc.co.uk/targets/.

     

     

     

     

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    golfer70
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    Great info. Thank you. 

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    charlie
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    Are you talking about Trajectory calibration(Truing)? 

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    stoti
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    I use Ballistic Arc and Shooter for long range shooting with my firearms to 1000yds. They're both great because there are so many imputs available for any conceivable condition. I figured because there are so many imputs and information that they would be great for air guns…wrong. They can be used but there are too many imputs for me, most of which are unnecessary for air guns.

    I was then turned on to Chairgun Pro and couldn't believe how accurate it was as long as the data entered was accurate. Even then, you still need to validate your drop at each distance, which is necessary with any ballistic calculator. From there, you can either mess with the imputs to get your drop at each distance to match Chairgun Pro exactly or you can just write down the correct numbers and use them, which is what I do. Super important to validate the numbers that the ballistic calculator shows you because very rarely are they 100% accurate at each distance, almost never! I really love how accurate Chairgun Pro is, even though there really aren't that many necessary imputs to get accurate drop and wind holds.

    With all of that being said, I've also tried Strelok with my long range centerfires and my air guns and really didn't like it at all. Maybe I gave up on it too quickly because I like the others so much. I know many do use it with great success, just not to my liking. If it works for you though and you like it, that's awesome and really all that matters. I'm sure someone here will have an answer for your question. I'm not disagreeing with you just to disagree. I just wanted to share my experiences and an opposing view because I think Chairgun Pro is easy to use, very accurate and all that's really needed for air guns. As a matter of fact, my 8 year old(almost 9), ten year old(almost 11) and I were shooting 2"-3" tomatoes and lemon cucumbers today out to 150yds with drop data from Chairgun Pro! Just my .02. Have a great evening.

    Stoti

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    lundrider
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    I assume you have all the info for the pellet you are using entered into the cartridge section. Click on the bottom right icon and you need to Click the BC tab. The pellet you are testing should be highlighted in blue and then shoot that pellet out past your zero yardage, so if zero is 50 yrds you need to go say to 75 yrds, shoot and measure difference from aim point and enter that for elevation change.  Make sure you change units to inches and then click calculate. 

    Hope this helps and good shooting. 

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    Hookster
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    bdzjlz

    I purchased Strelok Pro about a week ago and after fumbling around for about 24 hours to figure out how to use it, I find it to be very accurate and a huge improvement over ChairGun. 

    The only feature I have not been able to get to work so far is the BC calculator.  I have tried everything I know to try.  I fill in the data and nothing happens.  If anyone has a fix for the, I would appreciate the tips.  

    Even with that, it is well worth the money.

     

    Have you selected the GA function for BC?Give that a try. For me anyway Strelok is much easier than chair gun. And spot on. 

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    cmatera
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    I have yet to find a ballistic app I like.  I’ve tried Ballistic Explorer, Chairgun Pro and Strelok Pro.  What I want to be able to do is say “my gun shoots  +1.5” at 25 yds.  Where will it shoot at 50 yds.  All the programs I’ve seen require you to input a zero distance.  What if I don’t want to zero at any distance, but want to be + or -?

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    1BadDart
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    cmatera

    I have yet to find a ballistic app I like.  I’ve tried Ballistic Explorer, Chairgun Pro and Strelok Pro.  What I want to be able to do is say “my gun shoots  +1.5” at 25 yds.  Where will it shoot at 50 yds.  All the programs I’ve seen require you to input a zero distance.  What if I don’t want to zero at any distance, but want to be + or -?

    How can you expect a ballistic app to give you hold overs/unders without a zero distance? Maybe it should give you the winning lottery numbers too?

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    cmatera
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    Actually, I think I found it in Strelock Pro in the form of vertical offset.  Say I have a pb zerod at +1.5” at 100yds that is good out to 200 yds for my intended target, and I  want it there, but want to hold over/under at 50 yds.  Why should I have to rezero my gun to dead on at 100ds to get the data I want from the ballistics app, then rezero my gun again to put it back to +1.5” at 100 where I want it?  I don’t think that’s too much to ask for.

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    1BadDart
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    I only shoot springers so I don't shoot at the longer ranges that PCP shooters do but Chairgun was very close to the range cards I made for my rifles. 

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    charlie
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    make sure to click BC

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    LDP
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    cmatera

    Actually, I think I found it in Strelock Pro in the form of vertical offset.  Say I have a pb zerod at +1.5” at 100yds that is good out to 200 yds for my intended target, and I  want it there, but want to hold over/under at 50 yds.  Why should I have to rezero my gun to dead on at 100ds to get the data I want from the ballistics app, then rezero my gun again to put it back to +1.5” at 100 where I want it?  I don’t think that’s too much to ask for.

    You dont have top re zero. Every ballistic app I have used gives you exactly what you just said they dont. I can open up strelok pro or BA or chairgun and pull up either a range card that will show me exactly how high or low my shot will be at 50 yds or I can input 50 yds and get a reticle view of where my shot will hit with my exact reticle I am using if using strelok pro. That data does not require a re zero or to have a zero thats set at 100 yds. Either you dont understand the ballistic apps or you are doing something wrong.

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    cmatera
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    Probably the former.  Info on using some of these programs is scant.  I did not say you have to zero at 100 yds.  That was just an example.  You do have to enter some number at which the gun is zero’d.  What number do you input for a zero that is for example +1.5” at 100 yds?  The vertical offset fixes that.  Input 100 yds as the zero, then input a vertical offset of +1.5”.  I learned that myself.  Since no one could answer the question, I guess they don’t understand it either.

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    LDP
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    cmatera

    Probably the former.  Info on using some of these programs is scant.  I did not say you have to zero at 100 yds.  That was just an example.  You do have to enter some number at which the gun is zero’d.  What number do you input for a zero that is for example +1.5” at 100 yds?  The vertical offset fixes that.  Input 100 yds as the zero, then input a vertical offset of +1.5”.  I learned that myself.  Since no one could answer the question, I guess they don’t understand it either.

    You are going about this the very hard way. How do you determine you are 1.5" high at 100 yds? You probably shot a target at 100 yds correct? Most people decide what distance they would like to be zeroed at then adjust the sights to be on at that distance. It all starts with knowing what velocity the projectile is being shot at. If you dont know the velocity you will have a harder time getting any data. So once you know the velocity you can do several things based on what type of zero you want.

    #1 Ask the ballistic app to tell you what the best pbr is for the size of target you plan on shooting after you enter the data for velocity, projectile and scope height. The ballistic app will give you the range for the best pbr for the size of target you enter. With that data the ballistic app will give you the exact trajectory within the pbr window. You can also see what the trajectory of the projectile is at any other yard outside of the pbr window if you look at the drop table the ballistic app creates with the velocity, projectile and zero info you put in.

    #2 You can enter the velocity, scope and projectile info into the ballistic app. Then you tell the ballistic app what distance you plan on zeroing the rifle. With that info you can have the ballistic app create a drop table that will show you what your hold over/ under will be for any range.

    It sounds like you want the app to tell you what the zero would be if you were +1.5" high at 100 yds. Unless you have the velocity and the projectile data entered into the app the app cannot give you any data. In order to know what zero would give a 1.5" high hit at 100 yds you need to enter in the velocity, projectile data and the scope height data. Then within the app you could play around with different zeroes to get an impact of 1.5" high. Based on your questions it sounds like you are trying to figure out a zero backwards. Also just as an fyi thats not what the vertical offset is for.

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    cmatera
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    No, I don't want the program to tell me what my zero is if I am 1.5" high at 100.  I want it to tell me the POI at a different distance.  I have a lot of guns that are already sighted in.  I have determined the MPBR for my target size.  I know that for the target I am hunting, if I am sighted +1.5" high, a dead center hold will hit the target from 100-200yds, based on the trajectory for that load.  Yes I know the velocity.  I know the POI from shooting lot's of targets, not from some projection, ratio or extrapolation method.  FYI, that may not be what the vertical offset is for, according to you, but it gets me what I wanted to know.   Boris Strelok's manual goes over all the easy stuff, how to enter a gun, cartridge, and weather conditions, but does not mention vertical offset in the version I saw.  Utube vids were useless unless you speak Russian.  Who's to say what the vertical offset is for?

     

    http://www.accuracy-tech.com/zero-height-zero-offset-why-theyre-important/

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    thwakkk
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    cmatera

    Probably the former.  Info on using some of these programs is scant.  I did not say you have to zero at 100 yds.  That was just an example.  You do have to enter some number at which the gun is zero’d.  What number do you input for a zero that is for example +1.5” at 100 yds?  The vertical offset fixes that.  Input 100 yds as the zero, then input a vertical offset of +1.5”.  I learned that myself.  Since no one could answer the question, I guess they don’t understand it either.

    I think the confusion may be based on the definition of the word "zero" when used on a ballistics program. The line of sight (LOS) is a straight line which the projectile crosses at two points. At the first crossing the projectile is climbing while the second crossing drops thru the LOS assuming the target is at a range far enough away. These are considered "zero" points and the first "zero point" is what the ballistics program is asking for. One exception is a "one point zero" that uses the high point of a projectiles path (apogee) which I first saw about 5 years ago on one of the airgun forums. ChairgunPro has the ability to use the "one point zero" but I have never used it.

    Many decades ago when I hunted big game we would "sight in" the rifle at 100yds and wanted the point of impact to be about 3" high allowing a "killzone" good enough that I could basically hold dead on for a heart/lung shot from 50-300 yards.

    Another use of the word "zero" I have seen is the center point of a group. A perfect "zero" in this use would be a single hole for all the shots taken.

    Hope this helps…

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    cmatera
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    It does. I’m learning there are different ways of defining/looking at things.  I’m also learning that the basics are pretty easy to figure out.  Then, you get to the hard stuff.  Another thing is, sometimes you need more than one program to do what you want.  That’s why it seems a lot use Strelok for the reticle view, but use Chairgun for the range cards.

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    spinj
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     That’s why it seems a lot use Strelok for the reticle view, but use Chairgun for the range cards.

     

    The Chairgun Pro app version for smartphones also has a reticle view on which you can figure out POI at given distances by sliding your finger up or down on the range slider on the left (pictured below).

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    LDP
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    The manual for strelok pro says exactly what the vertical offset is for. You use the vertical offset to account for multiple loads in one firearm or for cold bore shots. Again you seem to be trying to take the longest most complicated path to find out what the drop is. If you know all the variables and have entered them then strelok pro will give you a chart from zero yards out to whatever distance you enter and anywhere from 1 yard increments to 50 yard increments. That chart will show you what the drop is in inches, moa or mrad at the yardage increments you select. The range cards in strelok pro are way better than chairgun in fact strelok pro is much better than chairgun.

    Heres a pic of the chart in strelok pro:

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