Sometimes things work out

Forums Springers, Pumpers, C02, & Replicas Sometimes things work out

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    hokiez
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    I've been trying to decide (read "obsessing over") which air rifle to purchase as my first…(see my previous thread), and today my brother gives me his essentially BNIB Ruger Black Hawk 0.177.  Did a little research, and seems that it is a Chinese made clone of the RWS 34.  But it's free, so I figure it's worth trying out.  Worst case scenario, I'll have gotten some experience owning and maintaining a rifle before purchasing a better one.  

    Given that he tells me he's only put half a dozen pellets through it and I'm a noob to air gunning, what do you recommend that I do to this rifle?  Should I clean the barrel?  Tighten the screws?  Purchase a better scope?  Anything need to be done to the spring?

    Thanks again for all the advice.   

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    Mike_Lenardon
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    shoot it

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    intenseaty22
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    Congrats on the gun. Probably not something I would recommend to buy, but Hey…Free Horse, ride it! I would clean the barrel and make sure all is nice and tight. Good strong rings and a Spring Rated scope. A cheap scope will get destroyed and you will think it's the gun, etc. With a good scope, if the gun is not worth it, at least you will know. 

    I would suggest hitting the Search feature up there and see what you can find. Sometimes there is plenty of info that has already been posted. 

    I don't own this gun so don't have a clue. Hopefully someone here can chime in and give you real life info. Some guys are able to make the lower end guns shoot like the more expensive ones….that's not me 😂. 

    Anyway, welcome to the club. Enjoy the gun, and start saving up for your next one. 

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    Lewis
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    If it has open sights, use them. I would't use a scope on it unless you need to. Out to 20 yards you can learn a lot about living with a springer with open sights.

    Search for "artillery hold" and shooting off bags with a springer. The value of getting good at these skills will last you years!

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    oldspook
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    Entry level springer…

    Don't slap it open and don't slam it closed.  Treat it like it is a finely made machine.  You wouldn't do that with a fine skeet gun.

    Springers sometimes benefit from a good barrel scrubbing when they arrive from the vendor.  You might consider that. 

    The shot cycle is violent and quite often the screws on the gun will loosen up, especially on a new gun.  Taker her down, clean her up real good.  Mind you avoid lubes and solvents which could cause detonation if they get into the compression chamber.  This is also called dieseling.  Tighten up all the screws and put a dab of blue lok-tite on them.  Don’t strip them putting them back, just snug them down good and trust the lok-tite to do it’s job.  Leave the gun overnight to let the lok-tite set.

    Scopes on springers take a beating.  If your entry level gun came with a cheap scope, it will probably be ok but monitor the scope’s performance.

    Pellets are a big deal when shooting springers. Spring guns are often picky about what pellet they will shoot accurately.  If you can afford it, get a pellet sampler and take the time to figure out which pellets in the sampler the gun prefers.  That will usually give you an idea as to what pellet weights the gun prefers. Pellet skirts:  Crossman Premier is a thick skirted hard lead pellet.  They shoot well in a lot of guns.  Some pellets that might shoot well in your gun will have soft skirts, prone to damage, examine pellet skirts for damage before shooting

    The artillery hold:  for now shoot the rifle with the center of gravity sitting on a soft pillow and hold the rifle only as tightly as necessary to maintain a good sight picture.  Once you master that, try to accomplish the same thing without the pillow.  It will come quickly enough.  . 

    Accuracy in general with springers:  There are a lot more people who think their favorite springer will shoot pellet on pellet at 25 yards than there are guns which will do it.  Mind you I did not say that there were not any gun/pellet/shooter combinations who can do it.  There are enough who can, to make most of us jealous now and then.  If your springer/pellet combination will consistently shoot under one mil (3.4 minutes) from a rest, it is doing good enough for the hunting line up.  That equates to 7/8″ groups CtC at 25 yards.  There are some middle and low power sporters (10 – 14 fpe) that can consistently shoot in the 2.5 moa (5/8″ @ 25 yds) range.  There are some light power high quality guns (5 – 10 fpe) that can consistently shoot under 2 moa (1/2″ @ 25 yds) or even a bit better than that.  These are not hard fast rules, just guestimations which should help you evaluate how well your shooting with your kit.

    Wind:  even a little wind can make a big difference with pellets.  I read somewhere else that if you scale the ballistics of an air rifle up to compare with a service rifle shooting a thousand yards, it compares fairly closely in range estimation requirements and drop estimation requirements but it is about two and a half times as hard for the air gunner to dope the wind correctly.  Soooo….

    Welcome friend, you have embarked on a great quest.  =) 
     

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by oldspook.
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    hokiez
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    Thanks to  everyone for the input!  And a  special thanks to oldspook for putting together such a comprehensive guide to entry level springers.

    I'm itching to get outside and shoot this thing, but waiting for it to quit raining.

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by hokiez.
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    JohnL57
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    What-no garage/man cave? I've had fun shooting in the garage when it's raining-I just stuff a box with old jeans and go to it. I only have about 7 yards distance but it's still fun! Make sure you put up a 3/4" plywood or metal backstop to protect your wall if you miss the box! Oh yes-wear eye protection too!

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by JohnL57.
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    hokiez
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    Got out of work a bit early today and put a few pellets through the rifle.  This thing is LOUD.  Sounds like my 0.22 rifle going off.  I'm going to have to find a way to quiet this down or I'm going to attract a bunch of attention from the neighborhood.  

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    r1lover
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    It's likely dieseling.  Keep shooting it, it will quiet down.

    Be careful not to clean the barrel with anything that lingers and has a low flashpoint and don't put anything similar in the port (the little hole from the compression chamber to the barrel).  Be sure you pull something through your barrel to wipe it clean.

     

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    Glenroiland
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    hokiez

    Got out of work a bit early today and put a few pellets through the rifle.  This thing is LOUD.  Sounds like my 0.22 rifle going off.  I'm going to have to find a way to quiet this down or I'm going to attract a bunch of attention from the neighborhood.  

    It could be either dieseling or pellets are so light they are breaking the sound barrier.  Choose a heavier pellet.  What pellet are you shooting?

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    hokiez
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    Currently using the Crosman Premier Hollow Point.  Is there a heavier one you would recommend?

     

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    oldspook
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    hokiez

    Currently using the Crosman Premier Hollow Point.  Is there a heavier one you would recommend?

     

    I don't know if I missed it but I did not see you reference the caliber of your rifle.

    That pellet is pretty much a middle weight pellet in both 0.177 and 0.22 so it is unlikely that you are going supersonic with that pellet in that rifle.

    It is a gifted rifle, made in China, and not shot much since it was purchased.  I'm going with the possibility that it is dieseling as being most likely.  There is nothing for that but to shoot it a while and burn that volatile oil off, unless you want to take the rifle apart and clean it.  You might take it into the garage and shoot a couple of dozen shots with it against a SAFE AND SOFT backstop (you don't want to get hit with rebounding pellets).  If that doesn't quiet it down, I'd be surprised.

    Let us know how it goes.

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    hokiez
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    Thanks everyone.  You were right…the gun was dieseling.   Smelled like I was behind a truck for a while, but it's quieted down substantially.  I appreciate all the responses.

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