Show your vintage airguns.

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    KWK
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    FUNWITHPAUL    that looks like a .22 LR semi automatic stock. I'd start looking at old issues of Shooters Bible.  

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    KWK
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    A few Airsporters. MK1, MK2, Stutzen RB2.  Notice the Beeman Double Adjustable mounts. I bought them from a fellow that posts here often. The flimsy aluminum clasps were bent when I got them. That's why they were discontinued. They're weak junk! Ape fisted people overtightened them trying to get them to stop moving on their magnum. To no avail.  So I made steel clasps to fit one of my 1959 MK 2 Airsporters. Look close. See them? Takes quite a few lathe and milling operations. Not to mention the jig I made to hold them while milling. And of course it takes two pair. Cold blued them. They hold just fine.  11 ft lb Airsporter. And look cool. I changed the offset of the clamp slightly so they worked better with the BSA MK2 oddball 15.5 ? mm dovetail. I don't have to use the widest pins. So it doesn't look like such a "Wide Glide". Mk1 Meteors used the same dovetail so I have to do another set some time.  Did Hakko make those rings? Hakko short scopes use the same pins.

    Neat thing about the MK1 and MK2 Airsporters is the loading tap opens automatically when you cycle the cocking lever. Newer model Airsporters don't do that. There's a real nice Airsporter S around here too. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    KWK
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    1912 BSA Military Pattern. 48 1/2 inches long. Front heavy. Powerplant is basically the same as a Sporting Pattern (45 1/2" .22). Only 420 produced. Early models are duck bill or some say bayonet cocking lever. Mine is a later side button .22 . Very fortunate to have one with such a small amount of bluing loss. And I believe to be an original sling. The bolt is not functional. You load with the loading tap same as other BSA prewars. Were never formally adopted by the military. Mostly sold to military schools. The buttstock is the same as an Enfield. Of course BSA made those too. Until 1940 when a certain German sent his bombers over. BSA did not produce airguns again until 1948 when they came out with the gorgeous MK1 Airsporter

     

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    KWK
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    Here's a beaut. Atom Rocket. Cool name? I believe it's actually a Japanese cone. Perhaps some original Diana 27 parts as well. I read somewhere they did that sometimes. Stock is similar to a 1919-20 BSA Standard.  Anyway, this is a neat rifle. 

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    KWK
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    Hi, I'm trying to attain my first 10 posts. So you get to see another interesting prewar BSA. This is #L373. A post WW1 Light Pattern.  Assembled from prewar Improved Model D light pattern parts. Only a low number of these exist. 373rd rifle(both Lights and Long Toms) assembled after the war.  You will not see any other use of the prewar optional straight hand stocks on post war (WW1) BSA. Or the side button cocking lever latch. I received it as pictured. Missing the cocking link. Took me a while to locate one. After which I rebuilt the gun with a home made leather seal. So many have a BB or whatever somebody put in the loading tap. Gets sucked or falls into the chamber and gets embedded in the leather seal. After it gets hammered about! I always open up new acquisitions to check.  Original spring is very good. 

    Post war parts used on these are the two hole trigger block and modified cast trigger guard. Notice the absence of the typical prewar trigger adjustment screw in the guard. That adjustment screw made a return on some 1930's light patterns and Club Standards(flat tops).They had stamped trigger guards by then.  Post war taller turret rearsite (Brits say "rearsite"). Taller foresite (as they call it) to match. Beautiful 39 1/2" gun.

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    Shagg
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    Dualmagmike any chance you can post pics of the markham Chicago piston and spring, mine is missing those pieces and I can't find information anywhere, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks shag

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    Septicdeath
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    Shagg

    Dualmagmike any chance you can post pics of the markham Chicago piston and spring, mine is missing those pieces and I can't find information anywhere, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks shag

    You should PM him. I'm sure he'd help you out

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    Moog
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    Really cool stuff guys. I'm starting to get tempted to sell off some powder burners so I can get some more air guns.

    I really like those classic Crosman pistols.

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    readyfisher9
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    b Both of these Crosman pistols are vintage. The Model 150 is quite accurate. 

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    KWK
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    The 150 is always one of my favorite pistols. I have several. Drill and tap for a set screw behind the trigger guard and adjust out the annoying amount of creep.I prefer the wrap around grips. I've shared my 150 beater with countless youngsters. Great firearm trainer. Never met a young man that doesn't want to try a shot!👍 Some young ladies too. (Get young people shooting! Prevents pandemic Snowflake Virus they can get at schools😃) Shoots real nice on the first click. I don't even know how many shots we get. A lot. Busted a lot of garden pests with one. Field mice, sparrows. 

    Why can't I settle down and shoot the 600 slowly? I just can't do it. It's like trying not to bite a tootsie roll pop.

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    Moog
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    readyfisher9

    b Both of these Crosman pistols are vintage. The Model 150 is quite accurate. 

    Really nice. That's exactly the kind of stuff I was talking about.

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    Jonah
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    A few pistols and rifles.

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    readyfisher9
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    readyfisher9
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    readyfisher9
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    readyfisher9
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    readyfisher9
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    Beeman branded this match pistol as the 850. Made by Diana as the 6M. As soon as the FWB 65 got popular, the 850 was dropped. Airgunwerk's rebuilt the dual piston setup. Custom grips by Mark Melesky.

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    Pneumatic-Addict
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    KWK

    Here's a beaut. Atom Rocket. Cool name? I believe it's actually a Japanese cone. Perhaps some original Diana 27 parts as well. I read somewhere they did that s

    That Atom Rocket rocks!  Here's the oldest two I have. 

     

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    provels
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    What a great thread.  Some real history you folks possess.  Reminds me of reading the "American Rifleman" articles on historic firearms when I was a kid, in the 60's, back when the NRA was more a sporting group and less the big money PAC they have evolved into.

    @dualmagmike Question on the Daisy BB doubles.  How do they work?  Break like a SxS to compress a spring?  Magnets to hold the BBs in place?  Thanks again.

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    DualMagMike
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    Truly a break barrel, one stroke cocks both barrels, loads BB's in each barrel and sets the safety. A piece of spring steel (wire) retains the BB's in each of the loading tubes until fired. The shot tubes of the 21 are the same as the the Daisy 25.

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