Recommend me something… AT44 vs. AT44Tac vs. Mrod vs….?

Forums General Discussion Recommend me something… AT44 vs. AT44Tac vs. Mrod vs….?

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    samkochel
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    Hello all,

    I am in the market for my first “adult” air rifle. I have shot firearms all my life and owned cheap crossman air rifles before. I live in a fairly urban area but have a large backyard and orchard and would like to shoot in them both. I want something I can shoot at paper for accuracy, shoot for distance to challenge my skills at hold overs, ballistics, etc… do some light hunting with (maybe up to raccoon), carry around the orchard sometimes, and store for months occasionally on end but be ready to shoot in an instant. However, while all these are important (power, accuracy, etc..) it really needs to be quiet and reliable and not too much money. I would like to keep the whole set up well under $1200. For a long time I thought I would go break barrel, but the accuracy, lack of recoil, long range potential and noise level makes me think I am going to end up getting a PCP anyway, why not just save the money and start there. 

    I’ve been leaning toward:
    -the Mrod, seems good on all the characteristics I want (and no nanny automatic safety)
    -the AT44, seems good too. Not as good looking in my opinion, but hear it’s more rugged, perhaps more reliable, and more accurate
    -the AT44 Tactical with a LDC that comes off and on, and a stock the can be removed (all this so I can carry it in a smallish/non firearm case)
    -the Gladius (smallish package)

    I would so very much like to hear input on all of these choices. Thanks so much for your time.

    Sam

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    EMrider
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    I’ve got both a Marauder .22 and an at44 QE short, also in .22.

    That said, I shoot .177 springers most of the time for backyard target practice and plinking.

    For the sort of use you describe, either the Mrod or the AT44 would be good choices.  Both are reasonably priced and within your budget even with a quality hand pump.

    Both are backyard quiet.  I prefer the appearance of the Mrod wood stock (with adjustable comb) much more than the AT44.  The AT44 stock is narrow on the cheek rest and the stock simply feels cheap.

    That said, I think the AT44 has a slight edge on the Mrod in accuracy, power and noise (less); and I prefer the slide versus the bolt.  The AT44 comes with two magazines that are easier to load too.

    If you do more target shooting than hunting, it may be better to go with a .177 over a .22.  

    Both of these PCPs provide a lot of features and performance relative to their cost.

    Good luck choosing.

    R

     

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    zebra
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    I’ve owned both. I still have an AT44 qe tact. I recommend going with the Marauder over the AT44.

    Accuracy could go either way with these guns. There is no guarantee that one will be better than the other. 

    The Marauder is lighter and shorter than the Hatsan with moderator or with a QE barrel. They both come with low quality stocks but there are more aftermarket ones available for the Marauder. There are more aftermarket upgrades for it too, like premium barrels and bottle conversions etc. Spare parts are easier to order from Crossman than Hatsan (which uses that annoying online form that nobody ever answers). 

    The Hatsan does have a side-lever which is better than bolt action but it’s not a particularly smooth side lever. The Hatsan trigger is better too  but overall I think the Marauder has the edge.

    If I could go back in time and give myself advice, I would tell myself to buy neither and go straight to a higher end air gun. It didn’t take me long to realize that I wanted something better.

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    spysir
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    How much do you care about trigger quality?  The marauder is truly outstanding , after removing the extra torsion spring it is pretty much a match grade trigger. Then do consider parts, marauder has huge support both OEM and after market and a super easy warranty if needed, even transfers.   Your looking for a .177? Or?

    John

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    medfordguy
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    Hi folks!, names ben and im  a newbie  im going to be purchasing  my first serious hunting rifle in .25 cal. Right now im going for a break barrel at this point since funds are limited and PCP’s are quite expensive to start up. I have narrowed it down to 2 rifles  the hatsan sniper vortex .25 and the benjamin np xl .25  pros and cons???  which should i get???  i have had several  cheap guns  mostly in .177. 

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    samkochel
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    Ben, why are you jacking my thread? haha no biggie, really.

    Question, is a Mac1 tune worth it on an Mrod for someone new to PCP guns. I can buy a .25 with a tune…or get one later. But maybe I should get it like that right away and not have to mess with it later, or not get one at all?

    Sam

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    samkochel
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    zebra, 

    Thanks for the input, really helpful. However, you got me curious, what would “something better” be? I see names like Daystate, FX, etc…but I don’t know much about these brands (I’ve been scared away by the prices until now). 

    Sam

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    zebra
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    “samkochel”zebra, 

    Thanks for the input, really helpful. However, you got me curious, what would “something better” be? I see names like Daystate, FX, etc…but I don’t know much about these brands (I’ve been scared away by the prices until now). 

    Sam


    [color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.701961)]
You aren’t alone. Many of us (myself included) were intimidated by the cost of pcp guns in the beginning. You aren’t sure so you want to “dip your toe” with the least expensive repeater you can find that has good reviews.

    The Marauder and AT44 are great entry level guns but they are limited. There is a wide range of better guns if you can spend more. I can tell you what air guns I like but your taste is what counts. [/color] I really like bullpups. I wanted one from the beginning and would have spent far less if I had just bought the one I really wanted initially. If you want something short, lightweight and easy to shoulder, checkout the Wildcat, Cricket, Edgun Matador, Vulcan, Bobcat. They are all excellent. They are quiet, accurate, good shot count, nice looking. Just choose the one you like best. For less money, check out the Jkahn bullpups but add the regulator option. If you prefer regular rifles, there is an even wider choice. There is a special on the Daystate Regal XL right. The BSA R-10 is a lot of gun for the money. Any of the FX rifles. The Kalibrgun rifle etc etc.  Try to save the money by buying a used tank instead and make your own fill adapter by buying components individually.  Consider this, if you buy a high quality and desirable air rifle, you can sell it for not much less than you bought it for if you decide it’s not for you. They hold value. Just check out the classifieds to see for yourself. I have never seen the $1400 Wildcat sell for less than $1100 and it’s usually higher than that. Some guns lose value more than other though…

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    Swing360
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    Sam, I would give a nod to the JKHan rifles. My first was a .22 Benjamin Marauder pistol that I didn’t too much care for, but the price is awesome (in my book) for what you are getting into. It shoots well, I just didn’t enjoy the trigger and it reminded me of my paintball guns. 

    My my second (JKHan Krosa Bullpup) rifle came from an awesome forum member here who goes by the name Batman. I purchased it used and paid not much more than I did for the P-Rod(marauder pistol) new and it was 10x’s the gun. A bit heavy, but a real shooter. I ended up selling that for money towards an FX Impact. I ended up holding on the Impact because it had issues, but that’s neither here nor there. 

    I ended up picking up a .22 marauder and after having the Krosa, I don’t really shoot the Marauder as much as I should/want too. It’s a great rifle, just not as nice as my Krosa was. All in all, if you can afford a step-up in price the JKHan line is quite nice. I will be buying another in .25. Also, I am looking at a P-Rod (marauder pistol) again since I overlooked the usefulness of this rifle as a beginner shooter. It’s not all about power, if you have a short range, that P-Rod can be a blast for business inside 50yds. I hope this KIND of helps. I am still very green when it comes to air guns, but have learned A LOT here. 

     

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    samkochel
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    Zebra, (and anyone else who cares to share their insight and knowledge)

    I looked at all the guns you mentioned. The Cricket and the Wildcat really appeal to me, as does the Daystate Regal XL (really pretty). Are these all backyard friendly and able also to withstand being bumped around some and so on. I am thinking of my firearms, which will outlive me with very little maintenance. How will these all hold up?

    Thanks again all,
    Sam

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    samkochel
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    Swing360,

    I have never heard of JKHan before, but looking at them I really like the Iluda N280. I would want it in .25 I think…maybe .22? It’s not badly priced as long as it’s, quiet and reliable and can handle a pump. Would you then assume it’s all those things. I see in JKHan’s webpage it shows it with a “suppressor” “moderator” on the end, but where do you get that? I plan to shoot it in my backyard and then at times perhaps up to 100 yards or little less.

    Thanks, Sam

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    zebra
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    “samkochel”Swing360,

    I have never heard of JKHan before, but looking at them I really like the Iluda N280. I would want it in .25 I think…maybe .22? It’s not badly priced as long as it’s, quiet and reliable and can handle a pump. Would you then assume it’s all those things. I see in JKHan’s webpage it shows it with a “suppressor” “moderator” on the end, but where do you get that? I plan to shoot it in my backyard and then at times perhaps up to 100 yards or little less.

    Thanks, Sam

    
The places that sell Jkhan guns normally offer a “shroud extension” which is what you want to make it quieter. 

    I believe the Iluda is the same as the Krosa bullpup but with a metal stock. This obviously makes it heavier but it is nice looking if you like the futuristic look (which I do). Those guns tend to spark strong reactions on the aesthetics, one way or the other.

    The 22 and 25 caliber uses LW barrels and if you get the regulator and shroud, you’ll have a nice consistent quiet air gun. It’s not as good as a Wildcat or Cricket but it’s not far off. The cnc work on them is excellent. The finish is as good or better than some of the high end guns.

    The thing to consider on the Jkahn guns is that they don’t hold their value as well. Used ones tend to sell $200-$300 less than the retail (or more in some cases). I think part of that is that they aren’t as well known and established. 

    You can hand pump any gun but I think it’s a mistake not to go straight to a tank. After pumping for a week, that’s what you’ll do anyway. 

    The place I buy my tanks sells used ones with a fresh hydro for $110-$130 (depending on the brand and age). You really don’t want 20-30 minutes of pumping every 30 shots. It’s like being back at school and having homework you can’t be bothered to do.

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    Deja
    Spectator
    Spectator

    break barrel 22 imo, theres no way you will be able to handpump a .25. 

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    zebra
    Participant
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    “samkochel”Zebra, (and anyone else who cares to share their insight and knowledge)

    I looked at all the guns you mentioned. The Cricket and the Wildcat really appeal to me, as does the Daystate Regal XL (really pretty). Are these all backyard friendly and able also to withstand being bumped around some and so on. I am thinking of my firearms, which will outlive me with very little maintenance. How will these all hold up?

    Thanks again all,
    Sam


    They will all hold up well if you look after them. Like any gun, you might need to replace a part or two over their life as well as perform basic maintenance.

    Air guns have O rings that may need replacing sometimes but they aren’t expensive. I haven’t had to replace any of them on my guns yet and I shoot nearly every day. I use cleaning pellets for the barrel sporadically and only do a full clean if the accuracy is off. 

    For context on how long pcp guns last, I have a mint condition Career 707 which was originally bought in the 90’s (not by me) and has held air and worked  flawlessly since then. Not a single repair bill apart from needing a replacement fill probe. I look after my guns well though.

    The barrels last longer than firearms barrels because they take less punishment and you don’t have to deal the gunpowder residue. Cleaning of an air gun barrel is just for lead residue (which builds up more in some barrels than others). 

    All of the guns you asked about comes with a decent warranty period anyway. If you happened to get unlucky and received a problem child (which does happen) the store will fix it for you. In my experience, a problem air gun usually becomes apparent early on. 

    If you do decide to treat yourself to something nice, add Ataman to your list. They are new to America so I haven’t tried their bullpups yet but they are high quality pieces with LW barrels, nice walnut and regulators. 

    Once you get one and enjoy the freedom to practice in the back yard, you’ll be hooked on pcp guns like everyone else here. Any ideas on budget limitations will be out the window. If you are used to the accuracy of precision firearms, I think you’ll get along much better with a high quality air rifle than an entry level one. Being able be to use it in your back yard means you’ll be using your air rifle far more regularly than any other gun you own, so buy it in that context.

     

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    zebra
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    On 22 vs 25, noise and range are the issues to consider.

    I moved up from 22’s to 25 because I hunt and I get better and more humane kills with the larger projectiles. They are better at longer ranges too but they are noticeably louder and they use more air.

    If you are going to pump or have neighbors that complain, I would stick to a 22. 

    With the Cricket and Wildcat, the 25 has a longer air cylinder (and barrel) than the 22 so you don’t loose shot count but they would be even harder to pump. I wouldn’t consider them without a tank.

    I use a 25 Cricket in the backyard but it’s probably at the upper limit of what I would call “backyard friendly”. You can get a shroud extension made fairly easily though. The cricket does have an external hammer spring tension adjuster so you can make it quieter by reducing the power, but, you intend to use it for target practice, so I assume you’ll need the range the extra power affords it.

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    glengiles
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    I would suggest buying new for your first PCP unless you have a burning desire to be a tinkerer/gun smith. Any issue, send it back and get another one or something else or your money back Used, you’re on your own. There’s a big difference in lower dollar platforms like the Hatsan or Benjamin as opposed to FX or Daystate where the latter can typically fill to 4000 psi or more and the former usually hover at 3000 psi or slightly under. This makes a huge difference in pumping and even tank filling. The nice thing about the higher psi guns is you typically get many more shots per fill. Because of the ammo costs and air usage, .25’s are not really considered target or plinking platforms but are pretty much seen as a hunting/pesting platform. 

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    RidinLou
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    Don’t forget to add the cost of your air supply.

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    Dan25
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    Something to consider are several guns announced but not yet released for sale.  The AT44 Nova is supposed to be out in October.  It has a 500 cc bottle and fills to 250 bar so you should easily get 60 shots per fill in 25 cal.  I expect a street price of around $650 or so after release.  FX has announced the Streamline which should provide around 50 shots or so per fill in .25 priced at $1K.  That said, I have been tempted by several AA 500s in the used section here.

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    TheLakeRat
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    I’d like to put in my vote for the Gladius.22 That was my first new buy and It is an awesome little rifle. I can sit on my back porch sipping a beverage and shoot at power level 1 with enough power to kill a sparrow but yet not enough to go through the plastic Purple Martin house. Or I can easily switch to 2 for dove or starling.
    At those power levels my neighbor cannot hear anything at all. Then i can go all the way up to 4 for a backyard coon and still be very quite. at level 5 and 6 it starts to get loud enough that someone outside next door MIGHT hear it, but i have taken rabbit at 90 to 100yrds with it.

    Whatever you pick, i would like to congratulate you. Have fun!

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    zebra
    Participant
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    “glengiles”I would suggest buying new for your first PCP unless you have a burning desire to be a tinkerer/gun smith. Any issue, send it back and get another one or something else or your money back Used, you’re on your own. There’s a big difference in lower dollar platforms like the Hatsan or Benjamin as opposed to FX or Daystate where the latter can typically fill to 4000 psi or more and the former usually hover at 3000 psi or slightly under. This makes a huge difference in pumping and even tank filling. The nice thing about the higher psi guns is you typically get many more shots per fill. Because of the ammo costs and air usage, .25’s are not really considered target or plinking platforms but are pretty much seen as a hunting/pesting platform. 

    
I’ll respectfully disagree (a little) on some of those points.

    If you buy used, it doesn’t mean you are on your own if something goes wrong, it just means you have to pay for the repairs yourself instead of getting it under warranty. That may or may not be worth the risk, depending on the gun and how good the deal is on a used one. Common repair like a repeal are not that expensive.

    Ammo costs are not massively different between 22 and 25. I don’t think 25 cal pellets are too expensive for plinking. I plink with them all the time. I get 60 shots per fill with my 25 Cricket. It’s a great plinker.

    on pumping the larger reservoir guns, it certainly takes longer and I wouldn’t want to do it but, if I had to pump, I would prefer to do it once for more shots than having to pump every 20 rounds. Plus, you don’t have to fill it all the way if you wanted to pump for less time. It’s good to have the option to have more shots. 

    If I had to go with a pumping set-up, I would look at the FX Indy. It’s not my cup of tea at all, but, I would prefer it over the usual hand pump setups. In the smaller calibers, the Indy looks tolerable.

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