Rangefinder for hunting?

Forums Optics, Scopes, Rings, & Mounts Rangefinder for hunting?

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    stinkajames
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    Hey guys. Looking to get a rangefinder for PCP hunting hares/birds etc. And would love some input. I don't need millimetre accuracy at 2000m or the price tag that comes with such a unit. I would think my requirements are the same as most of you guys which are.

    • Good accuracy under 200m
    • Reasonable glass
    • Easy to use
    • Light weight for carrying around
    • Robust enough for field use in weather.

    What would be some of the better value unit that you have personal experience with? Thanks

    James

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    BinSong
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    Get a economy Nikon rangefinder,as compact as possible, compared them with bushnell, Nikon won. 

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    SteveUK
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    Eyoyo gets good reviews and is inexpensive – available Amazon, eBay, AliExpress etc.

    Most of the various brands of twin lens units are OK – avoid the single lens units though

     

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    c_m_shooter
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    I have the Leupold RX-650 and like it.  Have been using it for 3 years, I change the battery before deer season if it needs it or not, but use it  probably weekly on the practice range.  Look carefully at the specs before buying one, most manufactures use the maximum range for reflective target for the advertised range, non reflective targets will be half or a third of that.  I took the Leupold out back the day I got it and verified that it would range some of  the neighbors cows out to 600 yards.  After having it I'm not sure how we hunted without it.

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    JimNM
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    https://www.amazon.com/Halo-XL450-7-Rangefinder/dp/B06XKN8N61/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1532430413&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=halo+xl450&dpPl=1&dpID=41X-vDn39OL&ref=plSrch

     

    That is what I use.  Has inclinometer built in and will figure your shoot distance for those high angle shots.  6x magnification.  One hand operated.  Not a bad deal at all.

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    stinkajames
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    Thanks guys. A leupold would be nice but a bit pricey. I like the look of the Halo JimNM. Have you used it in the field a lot? I do a lot of hare hunting so would love feedback from you guys that rangefind squirrels/woodchucks/prairie dogs and similar size/color game. Does anyone use them at night under a light? Does it make any difference? 

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    JimNM
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    The halo is not lit internally.  Yes I have used it at night, but you need to find a way to get light into the objective.  I have used mine quite a bit, and find it to be very useful.  Won't go shooting without it, really.  I use it for archery, airguns and powder burners too.

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    allan_wind
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    If you are hunting at dawn or dusk then you may want to consider a range finder with illuminated reticle/read-out.  I do most of time so elected to get a Leupold RX-1200I TBR/W (it was at available at a significant sale at Cabela's at the time otherwise way overkill). The /W is wind and to me is useless as I use strlok+ for hold over calculations.  You definitively want a fog proof, and one with an inclinometer as suggested by @jimnm.  If I was you, I would look very closely at the vibration reduction (VR) range finders from Nikon.  They are pricey but VR really makes a difference.  Nikon MONARCH 7i VR (non-illuminated) and I see their new Nikon MONARCH 3000 STABILIZED (illuminated).  I would have gotten the latter in a heartbeat had it been an option when I bought my Leupold.

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    Bob_O
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    RX-650 is what I use.  Perfect for day time use.

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    AnimalHitman
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    The most important feature in a rangefinder used for hunting is tilt technology. Rangefinders with such a feature will return the horizontal distance regardless of the relative inclination / declination angle. This is extremely useful because it will preclude having to factor in the elevation each time. If you use the true distance, your range card will be off if the angle is anything other than the actual elevation of the target. In other words, with a tilt technology rangefinder, you can calculate everything at zero angle and your distance will always be the horizontal distance.

    https://www.amazon.com/Simmons-801600T-Laser-Rangefinder-Black/dp/B00SNBQ6YM/ref=dp_ob_title_sports

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    Hotbrass
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