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Raccoon Diapatch Problems

Forums Hunting Raccoon Diapatch Problems

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    tbln930
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +0

    I am using a 30 cal. Edgun on raccoons using a 44 gr JSB at 75 FPE. I have over a hundred under my belt in about three years. They are a huge problem here. It's pretty deadly on them with good shots. Makes a loud wallop. I use various combinations of lights. I put a motion sensor on the garbage cans. 🙂

    If I ignore them for a few weeks their numbers really grow. 

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    Bigragu
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +72

    Can I ask a question without deterring from the tread? I see the conversation migrating towards light types so I need advice on lighting. 

    What about the green lights? I have both red and green, and the green seems to scare off the rats. Not so much on the white light, though. Haven’t tried my red light yet. The white light is coming from just a hand held flashlight with a zoom feature. So, any experiences with a green light?

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    nervoustrig
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +104

    I’m no expert on the subject but I experimented with both green and red lights for a couple of years before switching over to a persistent light.  I had a driveway alarm set up in the yard that would alert me to activity, then I’d grab the rifle and quietly head outside and switch on the light to look for the visitor.  The short answer is I saw no particular tendency for one color to be perceived as a more of a threat regardless of the type of critter. 

     

    Rats in particular are extremely wary and tend to high tail it at the slightest change in their environment, whether that be sight or sound.  Since they are toward the bottom end of the food chain, I imagine that has been evolutionarily advantageous.  But let me share some of my general observations and then we’ll get back to rats.
     

    Possums and armadillos for the most part could not care less about what light shines upon them, seldom warranting even a casual glance in my direction.  Several times I tried strobing possums and they paid me no mind.

     

    Raccoons were more wary, usually giving a glance but half the time going right back to what they were doing.   The other half of the time, they’d quickly move on.  Never a panicked retreat that I can recall, but more of a “Hmm, I don’t like that.  I’ll try this again later.”

     

    The most wary were rats and red foxes.  Every once in a while, they’d stay put when the light hit them but for the most part they’d retreat.   A fox would typically bolt for the woods.  Rats would generally retreat from the open and take cover in a pile of limbs and leaves where the edge of my property meets the wood line.  From there they would tend to stare at the light.  How convenient…two nice glowing dots to aim at.  It was a rare treat to see a rat, probably not so much because they are scarce but because they aren’t as likely to set off the motion sensor.  But yeah those glowing eyes make for useful aim points at 40 – 50 yards against an otherwise washed out background.

     

    Something else to consider…we see green light more easily than red so all else being equal, you’ll have better visibility with green light.  But at the same time, red light better preserves our night-adapted vision.  Either one will do just as well at lighting up some eyes at distances out to 75 – 100 yards.  If memory serves, guys who do a lot of ratting say red is better so if that’s what you’re going after, that may be a good reason to choose red.  But for example if you have some armadillos tearing up your yard at night, they’re not going to stop and look at you with glowing eyes so a green light will let you see them better and still be useful for the other critters who do.

     

    With all that being said, a better approach is to avoid using an on-demand light and instead set up a soft permanent light so the rats will get acclimated to it.  Then put some sticky bait out…something they can’t grab and go.  Peanut butter is a common favorite.  They’ll be dying to get to it.

     

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    Bullfrog
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +23

    I used to have a list of all of the animals I have shined and how they reacted to different color lights. One night I filmed a doe deer feeding and I kept switching between red and green.

    Most animals seem like they see green, or more specifically, they see their shadows that green light throws. It disturbs deer greatly. Coons moderately so. Most animals seem to totally ignore crimson red light.

    I do most of my shining now with an IR light and digital camera that sees in IR attached to a regular scope or a Russian style night vision scope (digital IR). Of course animals generally ignore the IR. Except…

    … I am convinced hogs and red foxes see IR light when they're within 50 yards. I'm sure the specific wavelength makes a difference. I mostly use IR in the 850nm range because it makes for brighter video, but I'm convinced those animals can see it, or at least see the illuminator. In the case of foxes though, and seems like hogs, I've seen them jump at their shadows when I've turned the IR on them with their backs to me. I can rule out them reacting to the sound of me clicking my light on to the extent its often a delayed reaction and they stay focused on their shadows low to the ground or the surrounding bushes. I've also seen hogs slowly turn around and then jump hard when looking right at the IR light, but at that stage I can't rule out them seeing the red blob on the illuminator itself. 

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    Bob_O
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +107

    I shot two raccoons with a green LED light.   I've shot about 25 skunks with green as well.  I've never tried red.

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    ranedouglas
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +13
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    LDP
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +44

    I used a .22 with 15 fpe @ the muzzle. Theres five coons laying there. The shots were at 25 yds. This was the most I have shot from one tree. 

     

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    Bob_O
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +107

    Nice!!!

    🙂

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    LDP
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +44

    Thank you Bob.

    These topics about how much power is needed are really hard to give answers to unless you give a number thats no doubt enough power. I would have the same results if I would have shot those coons in my previous post with a 10 fpe .177. I have allot of experience hunting/pesting animals and I know how, where and when to take a shot based on the animals vital organs like the heart and brain. I have done it for so long its second nature. I am not bragging and theres many more people who can do the same thing. What I am getting at is the experience level plays a big part in how much power is enough power to humanely dispatch animals. Obviously a projectile shot at a power level that wont penetrate to the brain or heart/lung will not perform a miracle if its shot by someone with experience. So I am talking in terms of enough power to penetrate the animals skull for a brain shot and penetrate deep enough thru the chest cavity to damage the heart/lungs.

    When you are working at the minimum side of power everything has to be perfect. The more experience you have and the better you know the animals anatomy the more likely the shot will be a clean kill. If you dont know where to place the shot at different angles then the lower power almost guarantees a bad hit. The lower power projectile has less effect on the surrounding tissues so it has to go thru the exact spot needed to stop the brains functions. If you use more power or enough power to cause tissue damage up to 1" or more from the projectiles path the shot can be off but still damage that area of the brain to cause complete shutdown. 

    I also understand that using lower power means I will have to pass on shots that are not ideal. Thats where experience comes into play once again. Without the experience you might think its a good shot opportunity when its really not. 

    Not everyone wants to be hampered with lower power when it comes to hunting and pesting and thats fine. I grab my higher power airguns or firearms if I feel like I might not get the perfect shot for my lower power air rifle. If one tool did everything we wouldnt have closets full of them. Coons, skunks, woodchucks, yellow bellied marmots, ground squirrels, prairie dogs can all be humanely taken with as little as 12 fpe if you put that pellet exactly where it needs to go.

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    efem09
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +0

    Cheapest way 

    Buy a used/refurbished Hatsan striker edge or normal one in .25 caliber, 1 lung or close range headshot inside 20 yards and they are down. 

     

    Im using a .25 caliber hatsan striker edge and i drop coons instantly inside 20 yards using a lung or headshot.

     

     

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    JDShapp
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    After having my own issues with raccoons and bad shots I can sympathize. I've taken raccoons out to about 40yds with my .22 Marauder and had them do the old drop and dance with no problems and it was hitting for a good 28 to 29fpe. Several years later and more practice I end up having some fairly uncomfortable dispatches using my .22 Mutant at just  under 15yds. Thankfully I've got some video that has helped me isolate the problem.

    First off side shots to the head are less risky than full frontal shots. With my best shots I've always done a lip squeak to get their attention, and then once they turn back to the bait or bird feeder they're wrecking I hit them. Now if they're up in a tree that's different. Very rarely have I gotten a raccoon to give me a solid side view because for some reason all the ones here like to play peek-a-boo with you till they find good solid cover. It's only in these instances when they look down at me after a squeak that I aim for between the eyes.

    I've also had to come to terms with how I view handling the raccoons I shoot. I don't really hunt them. I do pest control. If they're not causing a problem they get a pass usually. As hunters we all want to cause the least amount of suffering as possible, but for those of us doing pest control its the end results that matter particularly if the raccoons are causing substantial damage. What I mean by that is I'd never go after a raccoon with a .177 break barrel or under lever. My aim with them simply isn't that good. However if I happened to catch a raccoon in the act of digging a hole through my roofing or siding and all I had to use was a .177 I'd be doing whatever I had to in order to stop the damage before it turned into something worse. That might sound cruel, but I've found raccoons learn exceptional quick and that once they find a source of food or shelter they'll almost always come back to it.

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    sonny
    Spectator
    Spectator
    Accuracy: +58

    that was some dance, bandit 1

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    Makoda
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    I have never understood why people always think it takes less fpe for head shots.  A rib is a lot softer than a skull.  Also older animals have thicker skulls.  A couple inches and your in a lung but you may have to wait a bit for it to fill with blood.  This still happens with high powered rifles but you do many times get the shock to hold them until they expire.  
    My trap line gun is a 880 daisy never any problem dispatching coons.

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    Vetmx
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +76

    I have taken a bunch of raccoons with .177 13.4gr, .22 18.1gr and .25 25gr. Ironically all 3 calibers require the same shot placement or they are running off. Airguns are a joke compared to a .22 magnum and raccoons can suck up a lung hit from one of those and run off. I will say if your .177 won’t shoot a JSB monster or beast, you are gambling.

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    bigheadted
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +1

    not much mention of the pellet choice which I have found to make a pretty pronounced difference on the terminal effects. Just saying. 

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    bandg
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +34

    I took quite a few raccoon with a .177 many decades ago, using less powerful guns and less efficient pellets.  Raccoons are tough but it can be done with .177.  Shooting at the front isn't the way to go.  A side shot by the ear works well but as noted it can be a tough shot in many instances and needs to be accurate.  I'm a .177 proponent and it did the job back then well enough but a modern .177 powerful enough to move some of the 13 gr. or 16 gr. pellets should be adequate.  More caliber can almost always be helpful though.

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +78

    Racoon I took recently was with my BSA GRT LIghtning at just under 16 fpe.  She did not run a foot.  The range was close and the shot was in the top of the head.

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    M777
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +0

    The last raccoon I took (a few years ago) was shot at 12 yards with a 13 fpe .177 shooting an H&N baracuda match, between the eye and the ear. Dropped right out of the tree and expired after a few death spasms. At these power levels if I can’t get a side head shot between eye/ear I’ll pass and let em live another day. 

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by M777.
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    Redick
    Spectator
    Spectator
    United States
    Accuracy: +34

    Come on now a 177 for a coon is just mean especially a body shot shame on you for torturing that animal 

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Redick.
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    Bander124
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +5

    Growing up it was .22 mag with cci 30g Vmax (I think) or 20 ga slugs.  now that my living situation has changed I’ve been using r5 .30 but just got a brocock hp gonna give a whirl with slugs. It’s quieter than the r5 at full throttle

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