Pond worms?

Forums Off Topic Pond worms?

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    Dingfelder
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    I was scooping out some of the dead algae from the bottom of the pond (we have a great liquid algae killer now) in front of the house, and not for the first time I found myself scooping out thin pink worms about an inch or two long at max size.  And I figure where there are worms, there are probably eggs too.  It makes me a little uncomfortable because I had hookworms once as a kid and I never want to have stuff like that in me again.

    Any idea what they might be, and if I should stay the heck away from them?  

    We have deer, turkey and many other kinds of birds, and squirrels drinking from the pond, and birds washing and probably sometimes pooping in it too.  

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    heavy-impact
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    They're called blood worms or glycera. Fish eat them but I don't know much more about them.

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    Dingfelder
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    Yecch!  I didn't notice the lumpy head as in the wiki picture of glycera, but if those are they, gross, and I do want to stay well away from them.  Thanks for the heads up!  From wiki:

    Bloodworms are carnivorous. They feed by extending a large proboscis that bears four hollow jaws. The jaws are connected to glands that supply venom which they use to kill their prey, and their bite is painful even to a human. They are preyed on by other worms, by bottom-feeding fish and crustaceans, and by gulls.

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    kayaker
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    how many gals. is your pond ? I got away from the expensive pond liquids (fondtec -micro lift—) & went too pond blocks but mine only holds 550 gal. Have never seen worms in the pond except for the common ground worms here in the pnw & they were dead & bleached out

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    Dingfelder
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    Hard to say how many gallons, I'm useless at guessing that kinda thing.  What kind of pond block are you using … and what is that, something that you leave in to slowly dissolve over a long period of time?

    We tried tablets that did nothing, and now this liquid we found does a very good job on algae, but it's pretty much algae-specific, not meant to kill worms.  We actually like that wildlife comes to drink at the fountain, so we do want to use something animal-friendly.

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