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On lubing pellets

Forums PCP Airguns PCP Airgun – Discussion On lubing pellets

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    Chuck26287
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +16

    tor47

    Well I am not either an expert, but I would believe a most would regard a ES difference from 1,9 fps to 1,3 fps insignificant. But I would guess the most important thing is if the accuracy improve or not, with shooting from the tin, or going true the process you describe. And you would know, as it after all is your gun and test:) 

    Edit: Did not read it right, see ES is 5 on both (exluding the first shoot)

    Yeah, it's slightly more significant when you're talking SD vs ES, but I know what you're getting at.  It's very possible that the improvement gained solely by prepping the pellets in my case is not significant.  Visible improvement on paper in the form of numbers doesn't always translate to visible improvement on paper in the form of smaller groups.  However, if you do two or three different things that provide this small amount of an improvement, it might show up in smaller group size.  I was more trying to explain an approach to improving total result with variability reduction.  It all comes down to how much improvement vs how much time it requires, and your own sense of worth when evaluating that improvement.  However, I do think the people who consistently get slightly better results than most people are consistently paying slightly more attention to little details than most people.

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +62

    I like to think of these things as a trial and error process…try doing something a certain way and look at your results, then try doing it another way and look at your results. If something works keep doing it… if it doesn't then drop it. What works in an FX smooth twist barrel may not work at all in a Lothar Walther barrel…but how will you know until you try. There are some of us here that have spent thousands of dollars on range fees, various pellets, various regulators and other modifications, and thousands of hours of our time in the pursuit of perfection. We do this for fun. And we share all this knowledge and information free of charge in the spirit of our airgun brotherhood. We don't have anything to prove to anyone except ourselves, and we rarely post target pictures of our groups because they are almost unbelievable and too easily faked.

    There are many factors involved in achieving the accuracy we desire, one of which is our self discipline on the trigger. An example would be a couple weeks ago I let a guy at the range shoot my .25 Wildcat with my Bushnell 4X Prism Sight on it…at 50 yards I was getting 1/2" groups…the best he could do was 2 1/2" – 3" groups. The point here is similar to what a golf pro told me one day at the driving range…I was having a lot of problems and loudly said I needed a better set of clubs. He walked over and asked if he could try and effortlessly hit some balls into the next county…he told me there was nothing wrong with my cheap Wilson clubs and that when I could shoot close to par golf with them then I could go buy a set of Pings and the better clubs would help take four or five more strokes off my score, but that until I could shoot par with the Wilson's not to bother buying the Pings! He left me the one last piece of advice…and that was to have patience with myself and practice the right way. He said if I ever wanted to get good I would have to practice a lot…but that if I wanted to get really good then I would have to practice a lot more!

    So this is my way of passing his advice on…be patient with yourself, try everything, keep what works for you, and practice a LOT! Oh and make sure you buy an FX Rifle first not last! :-o

    All the best, Chuck

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    Chuck26287
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +16

    CHUCK

    I like to think of these things as a trial and error process…try doing something a certain way and look at your results, then try doing it another way and look at your results. If something works keep doing it… if it doesn't then drop it. What works in an FX smooth twist barrel may not work at all in a Lothar Walther barrel…but how will you know until you try. There are some of us here that have spent thousands of dollars on range fees, various pellets, various regulators and other modifications, and thousands of hours of our time in the pursuit of perfection. We do this for fun. And we share all this knowledge and information free of charge in the spirit of our airgun brotherhood. We don't have anything to prove to anyone except ourselves, and we rarely post target pictures of our groups because they are almost unbelievable and too easily faked.

    There are many factors involved in achieving the accuracy we desire, one of which is our self discipline on the trigger. An example would be a couple weeks ago I let a guy at the range shoot my .25 Wildcat with my Bushnell 4X Prism Sight on it…at 50 yards I was getting 1/2" groups…the best he could do was 2 1/2" – 3" groups. The point here is similar to what a golf pro told me one day at the driving range…I was having a lot of problems and loudly said I needed a better set of clubs. He walked over and asked if he could try and effortlessly hit some balls into the next county…he told me there was nothing wrong with my cheap Wilson clubs and that when I could shoot close to par golf with them then I could go buy a set of Pings and the better clubs would help take four or five more strokes off my score, but that until I could shoot par with the Wilson's not to bother buying the Pings! He left me the one last piece of advice…and that was to have patience with myself and practice the right way. He said if I ever wanted to get good I would have to practice a lot…but that if I wanted to get really good then I would have to practice a lot more!

    So this is my way of passing his advice on…be patient with yourself, try everything, keep what works for you, and practice a LOT! Oh and make sure you buy an FX Rifle first not last! :-o

    All the best, Chuck

    Spot on, and some of the best advise I've seen on this forum.  While I am a very quantitative kind of person, and a tinkerer by nature, I too do my tinkering because I enjoy doing it.  I love seeing the cause and effect playing out, proving or disproving.  I also always like to start out on a new piece of equipment by characterizing it.  I like to shoot it with as little of the human factor as possible to see what the equipment does.  Document its characteristics before I throw my skill (or lack of) into the mix.  That's where I'm at right now.  But, with how good today's moderate to high end airgun equipment appears to be, I'm sure it's usually the case that the shooter is most often by far the biggest source of variability involved in the shooting system.  While you do get little improvements by addressing little variables (like weighing and/or washing pellets), you get your biggest improvement by addressing your biggest variable.  That's what practice does, as for most of us, our trigger finger is the biggest variable we have.

    Sorry for getting a little off-topic.  I originally posted in this thread because I was curious as to what the data would say on the pellet weighing, washing and lubing topic.  I've seen lots of opinions posted, but not any data results.  Just thought I'd throw my quick test results out there.  I also think we can sometimes test until we're blue in the face, and at some point you need to just go shoot and practice to get better.  I'm really anxious now to get this Impact X out there 50 yards from a bullseye and see it's (our) first group.

    I'm looking forward to the sport of airgunning!

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    Drumsnguns
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +11

    Dawn, as good as it is, doesn’t quite get things squeaky clean like acetone. And acetone evaporates instantly. So that’s what  I use.  It also seems to let more crud fall to the bottom of the cleaning bowl.  The picture shows what falls off of one tin of JSB Exact Heavy  Then I lube with Finish Line

     

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    tor47
    Participant
    Member
    Norway
    Accuracy: +6

    Well I must admit  getting rid of that dirt on the pellets, should be beneficial. I always presumed that if the pellets was dirty, I would see led dust, or particles on the white pads in the box. But if it sticks to the pellets I might not notice it. Think I will try it out myself somethime, to see what is left behind.

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    Gaberossi
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    Well I shot over my chronograph tonight and all I can say is wow….

     

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    Chuck26287
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    United States
    Accuracy: +16

    Gaberossi

    Well I shot over my chronograph tonight and all I can say is wow….

     

    Thanks for posting data, Gabe.  Interesting to see that 1.3 SD show up again.  What kind of ES and SD did you get without weighing, washing and lubing the pellets?

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    Gaberossi
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    I have not tested right out of the tin in some time but next time I order pellets I’ll save some for right out of the tin numbers and comparison.

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +62

    Gabe don't you dare shoot any nasty dirty pellets straight out of the tin through your beautiful rifle! Your Barrel is 1 of 1000! You should be grounded for a week just for thinking such a thing! :-o

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    Gaberossi
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    😂

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