New Diana 34 Classic gets a good going through……

Forums Springers, Pumpers, C02, & Replicas New Diana 34 Classic gets a good going through……

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    TiredRooster
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    I've liked my 34P so much, I bought a 34 Classic about two and half weeks ago or so. It's sat in the corner the whole time until today. It's not been shot yet, but has been cocked and decocked numerous times. Cocking and decocking can tell you a lot about a new rifle before a pellet ever leaves the barrel. On the first couple of "cocks" it sounded a bit dry, but then quieted on up. This also gave me an opportunity to check the tolerances between the cocking arm and the forearm cut out. There were no issues there either. The distance between the cocking arm and the cutout in the wood forearm was more than adequate on both sides. Absolutely no rubbing whatsoever. 

    I wanted to disassemble the 34 Classic before I started shooting it for several reasons. With my 34P, I wiped it down, cleaned the bore and started sending hundreds of pellets down the barrel long before I ever decided to break it down. And I did this with NO issues at all. The rifle did, has, and still does shoot wonderfully. But I've learned a bit since then and wanted start out differently with this rifle. I wanted to actually see what the 34 looked like inside as shipped from the factory. I also now have a much better idea of what to actually look for. And mostly…I wanted to start this one out with a good massaging and proper lube before I began pumping the lead out. Just a different approach. 

    First off, all I have done so far is to just disassemble and inspect it. The D34 is so very simple to take down. This one was actually lubed pretty well from the factory. You can see the factory lube on the piston wall and also around the sides of the piston seal. It also had a very adequate amount of lube on the main pivot point of the barrel and receiver. The spring was not totally dry, but close to it. There really isn't a need for a lot of lube on the spring anyway other than quieting things down a bit. The OEM guide was straight and not deformed at all. The cutouts in the compression tube do not have any "burrs" on them at all. I ran my finger all around the edges and found none. However, they do have sharp edges and will get smoothed out before reassembly. The piston seal does have a very slight "nick" on it. I would say nothing at all that would hinder performance in any way. I say this because the seal on my 34P had a worse "nick'" on it and the gun maintained high and consistent velocities with that OEM seal. 

    This Diana 34 also has a manufacture date stamp on the receiver of 2017. Same as my 34P. 

     

    My plan is to of course thoroughly clean every part. Then I'll polish certain parts and properly lube everything before reassembly. Then we will give it a chronograph test and shoot it for accuracy. I'm actually quite excited about this because I have a brand new Vortex 4-12 that is just waiting to get mounted on this gun. After all this……just have fun with it! I will update after it all is complete.

    If you read all this…..I appreciate it.

    TR

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    intenseaty22
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    Wow, total tear down! Are you gonna polish the trigger innards too? You know a man means business when he has a large mug of beer on the workbench! I want to tear down my .22 LGV sometime soon too. Keep us posted. 

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    greenterror
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    I read it, I think it will be a great gun right from the start. Wish I did mine that way right out of the gate. 

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    TiredRooster
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    intenseaty22

    Wow, total tear down! Are you gonna polish the trigger innards too? You know a man means business when he has a large mug of beer on the workbench! I want to tear down my .22 LGV sometime soon too. Keep us posted. 

     

    intenseaty22, I'm not familiar enough with the trigger assembly to take that on yet. But now that I have two 34's and won't be out of commission if one is "out of service" I will eventually get to that. I know Outdoorman has some info out there that will be helpful when I get ready. And yeah…..I didn't even notice the mug until after I had posted the pic. It seems that either my Copenhagen can or my cold beer always seems to find it's way into some of my pictures. Hope it don't lessen anyones opinion of me. I'm just a regular old fella…no "airs" being put on here.

    Go ahead and get into that LGV….I enjoy getting in there and getting familiar with all the parts that make it do what it does. That's the beauty of a springer, it's not just a tube that has compressed air forced into it. It's a mechanical thing…with moving parts…pistons, seals, springs, etc. I love'm. They have character.

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    outdoorman
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    Yep, here's my latest video on taking the T06 trigger apart. Pretty simple once you've done it a couple times.

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    TiredRooster
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    Thanks. That is what I was talking about. Thats very helpful outdoorman. Eventually I'll tackle the trigger as well.

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    TiredRooster
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    I took the day today and finished up the 34. It took nearly the entire day, but I was off work so it really didn't matter. What I ended up doing was a very thorough clean and degrease. I smoothed out the receiver cutouts with a file to smoothen out some of the sharp edges. I polished portions of the piston wall just below the seal and also the bottom quarter or so of the piston wall. The OEM piston seal was replaced with an ARH Apex seal. I also replaced the OEM spring and guide with a Maccari GRT MK2 spring kit from ARH. The piston was lubed with super moly paste and the sides of the seal were lubed with a thin film of Super Lube. I ended up lubing all the pivot points i.e…cocking lever and barrel/receiver pivot with a mixture of 90 weight full synthetic gear oil and moly paste. I first tried this on on my 34P a while back and it works really well. After it was all reassembled and safety checked I mounted the new Vortex 4-12 on it and got everything tweaked and sighted in. And…… Wow! Im pretty darn well stoked at the results so far. Very smooth firing cycle, but the accuracy is what has impressed me the most. 

         

         

     

    It looks really good with the Vortex scope I think. But the groups I am getting out of this rifle are very good. Each target shown is a five shot group. It is shooting groups like this with consistency, not just here and there, but with repeatability. It is repeatedly putting pellets in the sam hole. I had to stop shooting well before I wanted to this evening, it got dark on me. I'll be waiting on that next off day so I can shoot it some more.

    Thanks….TR

     

     

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    hac_drone
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    How does one disengage the cocking lever from the piston for piston removal, TR?

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    SteveV
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    Again, well done TR – 

    Your post is a reminder of what a fan I am of the 34. I have two of the TO5 P34, one in 17 and one in 22. Great platform to own, shoot, learn from/work on, and either caliber has enough heat to pop a tree rat.

     

    SALUTE!

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    brad870
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    Wow. That middle group is insane.

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    TiredRooster
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    hac_drone

    How does one disengage the cocking lever from the piston for piston removal, TR?

    The piston just has to be positioned in the compression tube so as to allow the slot or "cut out" in the piston to be forward enough for the cocking lever to be pulled up to and then out of the circular cut out in the compression tube. The barrel has to be removed or the cocking arm has to be removed from the barrel block first. Either method works…..just a matter of preference. Not sure if my explanation is very clear……I hope this helps.

    TR

     

                

     

     

     

     

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