If you shim or have tilted scope bases

Forums Optics, Scopes, Rings, & Mounts If you shim or have tilted scope bases

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    Haganaga
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    I was looking up scope tracking and on some of the long range power burner forums there were a couple people who repair scopes and they said a majority of the repairs are the internals of the scope when they’ve cranked the scope all the way down to zero their scopes at -20 to -30 moa. THE PROBLEM IS they leave them there and the springs set or break altogether. Which results in crappy tracking as you can imagine. They recommend, and it makes sense, to return the reticle to neutral to store it. Then rotate to zero for the shooting session. FYI

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    Shinyknight
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    On my mtc viper pro. I used adjustable mounts but I still crank my turret all the way down and leave it as my zero. That way I have the whole range to dial back up giving me longest distance possible. I watch Ted's video on it and he said when mtc built it, they know about scopes being dial all the way down or up can damage the scope. But they purposely made the mtc scope able to dial down without damaging it. That's how I set my scope and it still hold zero at each yard I set it to.

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    Haganaga
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    Gotcha, but for the owners of everything except mtc, it may be good to store them in neutral.

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    Bob_O
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    Doesn't sound like a bad idea Hagnaga.

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    JamesD.
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    Shinyknight

    On my mtc viper pro. I used adjustable mounts but I still crank my turret all the way down and leave it as my zero. That way I have the whole range to dial back up giving me longest distance possible. I watch Ted's video on it and he said when mtc built it, they know about scopes being dial all the way down or up can damage the scope. But they purposely made the mtc scope able to dial down without damaging it. That's how I set my scope and it still hold zero at each yard I set it to.

    Very good to know. I’ll check MTC out. Thanks!

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    Skip-in-WV
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    Which way stretches the spring? All the way up, or all the way down?

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    nervoustrig
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    Firstly, note erector springs are compression springs, not extension springs, so the force acting on it is one that collapses it rather than stretching it.

    Generally, dialing the elevation turret all the way clockwise will compress the spring maximally.

     

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    Eamon
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    Skip-in-WV

    Which way stretches the spring? All the way up, or all the way down?

    Both, My contacts at Vortex assures me that is best do it DIY way to wreck a scope. Followed by shims as you put the scope tube under undue stress. You can tweak it enough to hurt the gears without being able to see it yourself.

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    nervoustrig
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    Please explain how it occurs in both directions.  Even if we substitute the word “stressed” in place of “compressed”, I don’t follow that statement.  

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    DuncanHynes
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    Never shim 2 separated mounts.  Shim the entire base itself or a one piece under itself.

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    Haganaga
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    Skip, either way, up or down. It’s the long term compression that creates “spring-set” where it doesn’t expand with the original force. This leads to, from what I’ve read, is tracking issues or clicks not being uniform. And dammit, I’m on vacation and can’t get to my scopes for a few days. Can anybody swing by my house real quick and center all my scopes???!!!

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    Bob_O
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    I centered mine before heading out for work if that helps you feel better.  

    🤣

    • This reply was modified 4 days ago by Bob_O.
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    Haganaga
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    Yeah, so much better 😭

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    shoot44
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    Self defense guys have known for a long time to spend more than you can afford for magazines you keep fully loaded and will never use, just in case. Some use specially rated springs for this task but are not cheap. Bet you anything what you describe is less likely to happen to a $2000 scope then a $500 one. Some of that unseen quality you pay for.

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    Haganaga
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    Yes, exactly. Which is why I rotate magazines and buy replacement springs. But I didn’t even think about this factor in scopes till I read that from a couple scope repairmen in another forum. Might prevent breakage or tracking issues on those cheaper scopes.

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    Haganaga
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    Let me ask this. Should I rotate the scopes to the opposite extreme and leave it for a few days to re set the springs? 

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