I have been a "shooter" for over 50 years and a optics guy for a long time.

Forums Optics, Scopes, Rings, & Mounts I have been a "shooter" for over 50 years and a optics guy for a long time.

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    boscoebrea
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     I do not find the need for a  bell over 44mm.Now-a-days I see  so many scopes with huge bells,ok I realize they bring in more light,butt then I shoot during the day . Those scopes are heavier and longer and look out of place just as the large dial watches do..Now as I write I am thinking maybe because they do not have "good" glass they need to compromise with size.Maybe if your shooting on a sandbag 200 yds. I admit I am guessing;So now I am asking ,why are so many air gun guys buying such large scopes? Thank you.

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    bubblerboy64
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    I think the short answer is because we can and it’s fun.  Price of these scopes is way down and since PCP’s have no recoil you can zoom in and see the pellet strike .   I’m shooting pigeons off silo’s at 50 to 75 yards and it’s nice to be able to zoom in tight.  But there is definitely the down side of the larger scope.    Certainly not necessary.    You of course give up field of view which you can compensate for by back off the magnification 

    The variable scopes give lots of advantages 

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    mtnGhost
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    Precision shooting at long range. Also, in other part of the Earth (such as my neck of the woods), we do not have a lot of usable daylight 3/4 of the year. A larger objective bell is desired (think PNW, old growth forests, dark by 1700 hours).

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    Metalmaniac
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    For every time you increase the magnification by 2 you decrease the brightness by 4  . So the higher magnification requires larger optics to bring the brightness back up. Of course the more expensive the glass the brighter sight picture and better contrast the glass has. The better you can see a small target the less chance of missing it.  ( Aim small. Miss small )  MM

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    edosan
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    True, I am not an expert but I have seen scopes on airguns that are usable in real long range (1000 yards +) precision's center fire rifles. Long range in airguns, 200y. But men, with those scopes you can almost see the pellet/slug all the way… Is worth it? If you have the money, sure 😂

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    dan_house
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    Hi mag scopes give you lots of options….. 

     

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    Smok3y
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    It depends on what you are shooting and how well you can see it. It is much easier to see a 1/4” target at 50yds when you have 30x or more. 

    If you are shooting at large targets, and don’t care about precision, you can get away with less. Many long range shooters don’t get out of the teens on their mag, but it is becasue that is all they need. 

    I personally do use the exact same scopes from my precision rifles on my air rifle, because I am familiar with them, I know they work, and I love having the high magnification for precision shooting. It is hard to shoot a tooth pick, or match stick, etc when you can’t see it. It also gives you the benefit of not needing a spotter, because you are your own spotter when you have the high mag.

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    GLPalinkas
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    boscoebrea

     I do not find the need for a  bell over 44mm.Now-a-days I see  so many scopes with huge bells,ok I realize they bring in more light,butt then I shoot during the day . Those scopes are heavier and longer and look out of place just as the large dial watches do..Now as I write I am thinking maybe because they do not have "good" glass they need to compromise with size………….So now I am asking ,why are so many air gun guys buying such large scopes? Thank you.

     

    Well, for me, it's because I shoot Field Target competition and a large "bell" brings in a lot more light at 40x than the smaller units. In Field Target, we may be shooting a course in the woods and even though it's high noon and sunny, its difficult to focus clearly for ranging the darker metal targets (under trees, shrubs, in pipes, etc)

    So, most of us that shoot Field Target Open or WFTF class take advantage of the rules and use max power and larger objective lenses. ( Hunter class has a max of 16x in the US)

    Hope that answers your question.

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    socaloldman
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    I feel ya Boscoebrea,   my reasoning is balance and fit because 90% of my shooting is to hunt.   Small light weight scopes work for nice carbine size hunting guns.   Hawkes little 2×7 AMX  (thank you mtnghost) or Sightrons High Country, (thank you Centercut) both weigh under a pound and may hit 13".    I do own a huge 6×24-56 and it has not found a permanent home yet.   What a beast, heavy unnatural and destined for life on a bench gun only.    I've hunted for 60 years and once had a fixed 10x Weaver about 50 years ago for hunting jack rabbits  in the Columbia river breaks near Hermiston, Oregon, but it was a 40 mm and weight just over 1 lb. We are in an era of "gotta shoot way the F %$#  out there "  but most of us hunters are not shooting game (pests) much beyond 100 yards on a daily basis. Probably more like 35 to 85 yards on average. 

    Not putting down anyone's opinion just my .02.  

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    bandg
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    Everyone has different needs.  I have several 56 mm scopes and use them regularly.  Also have a few compact scopes on light rifles.  Each has it's place for different shooters.

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    edosan
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    I like the idea of NO spotter

    Also, with pellets you need to be more precise since FPE is less so, head shoots is what we usually look for (body shots with powder are much more efective), spot that over 100 yards is hard, even at 50 sometimes.

    For hunting (FT is different) you do not need a us$3.000 scope with pellets, but if you have the money, go ahead. Is like we do not need Ferraris! jajaja 

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    ackuric
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    I have tried smaller magnification scopes…and personally prefer higher magnification. 

    Air rifles require more precision being much lower energy, aim small miss small…

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    Smok3y
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    ^^^^ This!

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    ptthere
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    I agree. Although it may seem counter-intuitive to put a beefy scope on an air rifle, I prefer to see where my pellets are hitting. I would also argue that high magnification through a 40-44 mm objective with amazing glass is far better than medium magnifacion through a 50+ mm objective with crap glass.

    The knife cuts both ways.

    PT

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    bandg
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    +1

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    boscoebrea
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     I hear you,choice is a great thing and Thanks for your explanations.

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    DuncanHynes
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    I have a 50mm on the Wildcat…on my .243 a 44mm.  If I found a good scope with a 44 that was FFP, illuminated, focus to 10y, reticle that I want for under $600 I'd consider.  Reality is my Athlon has all that but it just happens to be a 50mm.  Just how it is.  I imagine looks and other aspects drive the market to have the monster bells some of these tubes sport.

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    steve-l
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    The incredible precision of PCP air rifles invites high precision scopes and today high clarity glass, FFP, variable power, high quality scopes are available at very affordable prices……….that's why. As far as using objective lenses with  sizes above 44mm, I agree with you, it is not necessary.

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