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HW35E?

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    MP44
    Participant
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    United States
    Accuracy: +9

     I want a break barrel and I really like the walnut stock, which is the main reason that the HW35E stands out to me. If 10-12fpe is plenty of power, is there any reason to avoid the 35E?

     

    Caliber would be .177 and the use would be plinking from 15-45yds.

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    willy
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    United States
    Accuracy: +5

    their like a old Chevy 327 with 2 barrrel carb they go forever. 

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    FrankinFairfield
    Blocked
    Blocked
    United States
    Accuracy: +4

    You can’t go wrong with the best..

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    klentz
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    Accuracy: +3

    One of my favorite springers in .177.  Folks will criticize it for weight to power ratio but ignore how the weight helps off hand shooting.

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    AirShot
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    United States
    Accuracy: +10

    If you dont need the high power, then your looking at a winner !!  Great rifle, very accurate and weight always helps….the law of physics shows that more weight will cause less movement when fired, especially offhand but also helps with all styles of shooting.  Some years back I went to an all offhand match and won, using my son's 17 lb HW77… Yep 17 lbs…  Once you got it into position, it never moved !!!  

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    MDriskill
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    Accuracy: +11

    They haven't been making this model since the 1950's for nuthin'! It is a true classic of quality, styling, handling, and accuracy.

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    KWK
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    United States
    Accuracy: +10

    Why not make an HW35ek?   Walnut carbine.

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    specie
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    Accuracy: +0

    …barrel lengths: early 80's Export, pre safety Standard with beech, current production…

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    MP44
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    Accuracy: +9

    The HW35E has been ordered. Thanks for the replies!!

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    bf1956
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    Accuracy: +5

    Wow! you got a beauty there klentz…

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    L4z4r0s
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    Greece
    Accuracy: +1

    MP44

    The HW35E has been ordered. Thanks for the replies!!

    Which one is it going to be? Blued of nickel finished?

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    MP44
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    United States
    Accuracy: +9

    L4z4r0s

    MP44

    The HW35E has been ordered. Thanks for the replies!!

    Which one is it going to be? Blued of nickel finished?

    Blued

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    jaykb49
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    Accuracy: +1

    klentz

    One of my favorite springers in .177.  Folks will criticize it for weight to power ratio but ignore how the weight helps off hand shooting.

     

    Could you give us any more information on that beautiful rifle? Serial number would suggest late sixties? What wood is the stock made of?

    Thanks,

    Jay

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    klentz
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    Accuracy: +3

    bf1956

    Wow! you got a beauty there klentz…

    Thank you Sir.

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    klentz
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    Accuracy: +3

    jaykb49

    klentz

    One of my favorite springers in .177.  Folks will criticize it for weight to power ratio but ignore how the weight helps off hand shooting.

     

    Could you give us any more information on that beautiful rifle? Serial number would suggest late sixties? What wood is the stock made of?

    Thanks,

    Jay

    Stock is walnut.  Has incredible tiger stripping.  Years ago Mike Driskill, whom I greatly respect, theorized that this gun was a special presentation for two reasons:

    1-It sat on display in a German gun shop for many years

    2-The serial number, that can be seen in the photo, is 300035.  A coincidence for a stunning example of an HW35?

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    MDriskill
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    United States
    Accuracy: +11

    Klentz's HW 35L ("Luxus") is possibly the most beautiful Weihrauch rifle I have ever seen, period…which is sayin' something! As he noted, it's very tempting to think it was an individual factory special of some sort; besides the jaw-dropping wood, the metal polish and blueing seem extraordinary. But hey, I'm not envious or anything, LOL…

    That pattern of Luxus stock – classic German "hogs back" comb line, "stretched hexagon" Bayern cheekpiece, and rounded finger-groove fore end – was made up until the mid 1970's I think (after which the "L" became a more squared-up fore end with Monte Carlo comb and American-style cheekpiece). The 300035 serial dates to 1969.

    The wood is European walnut (juglans regia); a.k.a. Royal, Circassian, Turkish, French, etc. It tends to have a lighter, warmer color than North American black walnut (juglans nigra) and as you can see, is capable of equally spectacular figuring. This is the wood you see on older HW 35's and 55's and the golden-era spring-piston match rifles from Walther, Anschutz, FWB, and Diana.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by MDriskill.
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    klentz
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    Accuracy: +3

    MDriskill

    Klentz's HW 35L ("Luxus") is possibly the most beautiful Weihrauch rifle I have ever seen, period…which is sayin' something! As he noted, it's very tempting to think it was an individual factory special of some sort; besides the jaw-dropping wood, the metal polish and blueing seem extraordinary. But hey, I'm not envious or anything, LOL…

    That pattern of Luxus stock – classic German "hogs back" comb line, "stretched hexagon" Bayern cheekpiece, and rounded finger-groove fore end – was made up until the mid 1970's I think (after which the "L" became a more squared-up fore end with Monte Carlo comb and American-style cheekpiece). The 300035 serial dates to 1969.

    The wood is European walnut (juglans regia); a.k.a. Royal, Circassian, Turkish, French, etc. It tends to have a lighter, warmer color than North American black walnut (juglans nigra) and as you can see, is capable of equally spectacular figuring. This is the wood you see on older HW 35's and 55's and the golden-era spring-piston match rifles from Walther, Anschutz, FWB, and Diana.

    Thanks for chiming in Mike.  As you well know, the early Walther's had some nice wood too:

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    L4z4r0s
    Participant
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    Greece
    Accuracy: +1

    MP44

    L4z4r0s

    MP44

    The HW35E has been ordered. Thanks for the replies!!

    Which one is it going to be? Blued of nickel finished?

    Blued

    Oh nice!!! Take pictures once this beauty arrives!!!

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    Fischer
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +4

    I have all four!

    HW35E Blue .177

    HW35E Silver .177

    HW35E Blue .22

    HW35E Silver .22

    I got the Silver .22 last.   In fact, it has been the last rifle I purchased and have in the house.  It is a fine machine which does not surprise me.  I love them all and use them with their open sights on dot front and u notch rear.  The .22 Blue has a 3-9X 33mm Leupold–it was the only one of four that could take a fix mounted 3 screw sideplate with the Leu to zero; the other 35Es I have cannot be scoped unless I put adjustable rings on them.  I chose not to and just use the iron sights to 25 yards with ease.

    These are solid rifles you do not "slam" shut!  You just "snick" them shut with the lock and all is fine everytime!  No inconsistency as the design of the barrel lock is mastermind rated.

    It works out to all open sight ranges you'd shoot an air rifle!

     

    I did find the HW50S in .20 with a scope to be more accurate and the open sighted other .20 HW50S I have is actually BETTER than open sighted HW35Es.

    However, the 50 and the 35 are here to stay.  I feel they are the best kind of air rifles made without jumping into higher velocity types.

    Kindly,

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    OldCrow
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    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    klentz

    MDriskill

    Klentz's HW 35L ("Luxus") is possibly the most beautiful Weihrauch rifle I have ever seen, period…which is sayin' something! As he noted, it's very tempting to think it was an individual factory special of some sort; besides the jaw-dropping wood, the metal polish and blueing seem extraordinary. But hey, I'm not envious or anything, LOL…

    That pattern of Luxus stock – classic German "hogs back" comb line, "stretched hexagon" Bayern cheekpiece, and rounded finger-groove fore end – was made up until the mid 1970's I think (after which the "L" became a more squared-up fore end with Monte Carlo comb and American-style cheekpiece). The 300035 serial dates to 1969.

    The wood is European walnut (juglans regia); a.k.a. Royal, Circassian, Turkish, French, etc. It tends to have a lighter, warmer color than North American black walnut (juglans nigra) and as you can see, is capable of equally spectacular figuring. This is the wood you see on older HW 35's and 55's and the golden-era spring-piston match rifles from Walther, Anschutz, FWB, and Diana.

    Thanks for chiming in Mike.  As you well know, the early Walther's had some nice wood too:

    That is a nice piece of wood.  Beautiful!  I would be afraid to take that from the safe to the bench.  And you have kept it well!  Keepsake.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by OldCrow.
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