Groups in windy conditions.

Forums General Discussion Groups in windy conditions.

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    Gunnertrones
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    Now and then I see posts stating marvelous tight groups shot at long distances in “shifting windy conditions”, 

    Maybe silly, but I can’t help asking myself – what if there were no wind at all, would the group open up?

    (I assume no aim correction for wind is done when you are shooting groups on paper).

    Anyone else having sleepless nights thinking about this? 🤔

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    JCD
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    I can't speak for anyone else but I definitely hold for wind when shooting pretty much anything. My problem is that I can't judge the shifts or intermittent wind speeds from where I shoot. I'm just not very good at it! 

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    Laity
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    I love shooting groups at 100 yards , The wind is always a factor and I always have to adjust for it . Luckily where I shoot there is a flag right behind the target , With both eyes open I can judge the wind and then take the shot . My buddy and I are looking at using an under ground tunnel to see how what the difference is in group sizes , its also 100 yards long so should be brilliant to see what is going on . It does mean weighing a whole bunch of pellets , it will be worth it though I'm sure . I wnat to see what the gun does at different speeds  using different pellets and take the info and  use that outside . I  must be honest , I do think about tight groups far far too much . Its an obsession now !

     

     

    Rog

    • This reply was modified 5 days ago by Laity.
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    bandg
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    Seems there is a lot of luck involved with shooting in the wind.  Not that some aren't very good at it-practice can improve anything.  But it seems that gusty (and especially shifting) winds make it much more likely for group sizes to open.  But sometimes any shooter can get lucky and shoot a very good group in such winds.  If they do it consistently, then that's probably a totally different matter.

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    Centercut
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    bandg

    Seems there is a lot of luck involved with shooting in the wind.  Not that some aren't very good at it-practice can improve anything.  But it seems that gusty (and especially shifting) winds make it much more likely for group sizes to open.  But sometimes any shooter can get lucky and shoot a very good group in such winds.  If they do it consistently, then that's probably a totally different matter.

    Agree…  Anyone that tells you some amount of luck isn't involved in shooting targets at 100 yards in swirling gusty wind conditions hasn't shot in those conditions…  ;)

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    Crosman999
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    Thank goodness for those sighter targets lol

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    Centercut
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    Crosman999

    Thank goodness for those sighter targets lol

    Sometimes they are worthless.  When the wind direction is changing every 5 to 10 seconds, and you shoot a few sighters, and as you are pulling the trigger on a scoring target the wind shifts…  and you go in the 4 or 5 ring, or miss the target altogether.  I watched that happen not just to me, but also to EBR winners at RMAC…

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    JimNM
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    I find that shooting after the sun goes down really helps to eliminate the wind (usually :))  We take an ATV to light the target and have the truck bed lights for the shooting area. It takes a little more effort to stay safe, but it is a lot of fun.  With a gun mounted light, I can trace the pellet flight from the barrel for about 40 yards.  My best groups ever have been shot during the after dark sessions.

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    shoot44
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    LUCK WINS EVERY TIME! But usually the more you know the luckier you get.

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    intenseaty22
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    Funny enough I brought my guns to SD with the hopes to do a little shooting past my comfort zone and I just literally realized: Damn it’s windy here! Always!! 

    Guess will have some answers soon. Only PCP I brought is the Mini, so will see what she can do! Says it’s 13 mph right now here. 

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    Willie14228
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    intenseaty22

    Funny enough I brought my guns to SD with the hopes to do a little shooting past my comfort zone and I just literally realized: Damn it’s windy here! Always!! 

    Guess will have some answers soon. Only PCP I brought is the Mini, so will see what she can do! Says it’s 13 mph right now here. 

    LOL keep praying for wind, I live in Texas always thought we have some of the meanest blood suckers in the U.S till I stuck around SD OMG they will eat you alive. And flies, nats will drive you nuts 

     

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    MileHighAirGunner
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    intenseaty22

    Funny enough I brought my guns to SD with the hopes to do a little shooting past my comfort zone and I just literally realized: Damn it’s windy here! Always!! 

    Guess will have some answers soon. Only PCP I brought is the Mini, so will see what she can do! Says it’s 13 mph right now here. 

    HaHa. I think anything else than 25 mph in SD is considered a light summer breeze. Outside of CO I have spent more time in SD than anywhere else. I hunt SD pheasant every fall. I’ve hunted in wind so strong up there that I’ve watched guys shoot a pheasant 20 yards to the side of me with a 12 gauge shotgun and just barely heard the shot. 

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    intenseaty22
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    BTW, to clarify: SD = South Dakota. 

    Got to the shooting range last night. No shooting, just to look. They literally cut the shooting lanes into the bluffs. So I may not be affected by wind? Will see.

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    elh0102
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    I did a lot of RF and CF benchrest shooting years ago, and I became very good at managing the wind. If it was over 10 mph, I stayed home! But, I did pick up a few habits that helped. First, flags, lots of flags. One at the target is almost useless. With air rifles, at a 50 yard target, if I were trying to do it competitively, I'd probably have at least 4 flags out. If you're group shooting, you look for consistency in the conditions,since you don't really care where the group prints. But, if you have 4 in a good group, conditions are changing and time is running out, you probably have to take a shot and hold for the wind, just as in score shooting. I always tried to watch for the calmest repeating condition and avoid as much wind as possible. Of course, shooting as I do now, just to entertain me and the puppy, I can sit there all day if I have to in order to get that best condition. But whether for competition or just passing time, if you really want the best score or group possible, it takes some flags, and the discipline to learn from them. I use survey flagging, it's very susceptible to movement from even slight winds. So, if you have your third and fourth flags blowing at 20 degrees, then maybe that translates to a half-inch hold into the wind. I can write that much easier than I can do it, but that's the gist of it. Longer flags will give you more detail, since it takes more wind to move them to the same position. Purpose-built BR flags usually have a propeller attached too, which helps with the wind speed. Really reading the wind is about equal parts art, science, and luck. At longer distances, it's not unusual to have several different wind conditions between you and the target. Good luck. 

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    intenseaty22
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    I was able to shoot a little today. Hope to have better data next time. I found a great spot to shoot at, but was limited on time. Wind WAS a factor. 4 shots POA not in picture, but it’s the upper right corner diamond. Hades at 800 fps at 53 yards. Hope to get some shots at 100 next time, going to increase speed too, although have to guess, no Chrono on trip. 

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    Crosman999
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    You know it's bad when guy next to you is hitting neighbors target. Haha Few years ago it was a mean tail wind that was ramping up the bank pushing my pellet close to 3 mills upward. Never really experienced that anywhere else before. 

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    spysir
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    Certainly would tighten em up.  

    .177 is the cal. that teaches wind reading & doping. Now if you must shoot in what I'd car a parking lot (standard BP range) with no grass/tree's/something to judge ugh, wind flags would be a must. Outdoors as in FT in on a grassy/wooded course 20fpe then "12fpe" does really offer an opportunity to figure some wind freestyle.  Makes shooting anything else easier airgun or other.

     A "bragging" group from some years ago,  four  3 shot groups at 110 yards in .177.  Pretty well the end of energy it seemed as most pellets did not pass through the cardboard baker.  Winds were gusting to a measured 15mph w/heavy Hollow swirl  with a 60" total wind block at 60 yards (barn). NO idea where the missing pellet went.

     A bit over 15 minutes to shoot 12 shots while trying to watch everything that could blow/move.   Briefly thought of welding 50 or so 55gal. can together for a wind tunnel but that's really just for tuners and harder core airguns than myself. 

      And ya, could be any wind pushing against the rifling of pellet in flight just might exasperate any possible wobble/other , any pellet defect showing up greater in wind, and????????????     

     

    John

     

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