group tracking with mill dot scope

Forums General Discussion group tracking with mill dot scope

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    r1d2
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    I am new to the pcp world,i have air arms fac 500 in 177 cal,when i’m zeroed dead on at 25 yds and move to 50 yds the gun shoots 2 inches to the right and at75yds it is more than 3 inches to the right.i’m shooting with no wing and the cross hairs are straight up and down,is this normal for the 177 cal does the pellet yaw as the distance increase.information would be appreciated.

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    Ginuwine1969
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    You’re scope is crooked, swap the front and back rings and try it again.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6DT_jUEpNw
     

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    Scotchmo
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    Your far shots hit right. What about at 10 yards?

    If you have insured that your crosshair is being held truly vertical, then the scope may be out of rotation. Loosen the ring caps, rotate clockwise and tighten. The vertical crosshair must intersect the bore.

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    r1d2
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    10 yrd group shoot to the left,according to your ilustration i must be canting the the gun with a crooked scope,weather permitting i’ll put it on the bench in the next few days.thanks for the help.

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    Wizard
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    The information that has been provided to you is dead on the money. Let’s go one step further the rings  that we buy (even the high dollar ones) do not set flush on our scopes. We need check them for alignment and surface contact. For the ring to really work for you it needs to have 80-90% of its surface in contact with our scope. Wheeler makes kite for lapping our rings. The most expensive ring I have bought only made 50% surface contact out the box. Some use a tape between the ring and scope to deal with the imperfections.                                                                                                          Now you need to set your gun up so it is level using a small wheeler level on the scope rail. Hang a weight on a rope, this will give you a true vertical. With your rifle  level check your scopes vertical agents the rope. When they line up tighten down your scope rings (no more than 18 inch pound on the screws)                                                                                                                                             The last thing to do is to buy an anti-cant level to mount to your scope now that your rifle and scope are aliened. If you viewed Ted’s impact review you will notes he has one on his scope and the rifles rail. I have them on my high power powder burn, rim fire’s, both PCP’s, and even my RWS Springer. It’s really amazing how without realizing it you can cant your rifle and this makes a big difference in your grouping at long range.  Wizard

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    Scotchmo
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    The bisecting line between the scope center and bore center is the important feature for scope cant. The vertical of the crosshair should lie on that bisecting line. And then that’s what you need to hold level (vertical) when you shoot.

    Holding the action level does not necessarily mean that the scope is centered above the bore. The easy way to center the scope above the bore is to tip the rifle slightly one way or the other.

    Your mounts can be way off center and still work fine as long as your scope is in rotation and you hold the rifle correctly.

    I prefer a scope level that mounts on the scope tube and can be adjusted/rotated to line up with the reticle.

    Rotate scope in the mounts to get the crosshair lined up with the bore first. Then, use the level to hold it vertical while shooting.

    Note:
    If your 10 yard and 25 yard shots are hitting about where expected, but the 50 yards shots hit right, then you are just holding the gun canted.

    If the 10 yards shots hit left, but the 50 yard shots hit right, then your scope is canted in the rings.

    Edit:
    Use of the Wheeler system that was mentioned requires some assumptions (usually incorrect). I would definitely NOT use that method on my guns.

    Incorrect assumption #1: the scope rings are centered perfectly on the scope rail.

    Incorrect assumption #2: the scope cap is perfectly level with respect to the reticle.

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    Tominco
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    Scotchmo – GREAT info! Thanks for sharing with all of us. + for you!

    R1d2 – perhaps my video could be of some assistance in setting up? I use the plumb bob method that Wizard is referring to. Scotchmo also refers to holding the rifle canted for the 50yd shots. This is very easy to do and not realize it. I was doing this for a long time and finally got a scope mounted anti-cant device (level). It was a real eye opener watching how I naturally canted the rifle. 

    Tom

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    poorshot
    Participant
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    Thanks guys this is great info.
    I had pretty much decided that I am all over the shop in terms of cant and I need to get a level to check myself.
    My new gun (wildcat) will have higher mounts than my current one so I feel the need to get myself sorted!
    With the info above I can make sure the mechanics are correct to start.
    Cheers.

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    r1d2
    Participant
    Member

    thanks for the info,after putting the gun on the bags on my bench rest and some scope adjustment i found i was canting the rifle and my scope hairs was not vertical with the bore.after these corrections problem solved.

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