Greater BC Doesn't Mean Less Drift?

Forums Pellets, Projectiles, Slugs, & Ammo Greater BC Doesn't Mean Less Drift?

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    EliteAirgunr
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    So I’m seeing that a lot of the ballasitic coefficient data is based off how much velocity lossage at a certain distance. Does this go hand in hand with how much the wind will effect pellet drift?

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    addertooth
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    It is generally associated with drift, but not perfectly associated with drift.  Most rounds with a great BC, tend to have less drift.  One of the key elements to a low BC is MASS (there are bunches of factors, but it has a strong common factor in very low BC rounds/pellets).  A heavier pellet travelling at 850 feet per second is less susceptible to drift than a really light pellet travelling at the same speed.  It remains to be seen if the new (very long, but a huge side profile) .22 caliber “sniper” pellets, will be anywhere as low in drift, as a similarly weighted (but shorter and squatter) .25 caliber pellets (both are around 34 grains of weight).  

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    stoti
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    BC is the projectiles ability to overcome air resistance. Heavy pellets generally have a higher BC than lighter pellets and drift less in the wind. Shape and design have a lot to do with the BC too. Think of throwing an aerodynamic rock vs. a ping pong ball with no mass.

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    stoti
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    With projectiles that have the same mass, the longer, more aerodynamic projectile will always have a higher BC… Hornady ELD-X, Berger VLD, Nosler RDF, etc… 

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