FX Timberwolf trigger went wacko today

Forums General Airgunning FX Timberwolf trigger went wacko today

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    Diamondback
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    I have an old school FX Tarantula, and a 2-shot FX Timberwolf. Both are 22’s.
    I love the trigger on my Tarantula, and have always noticed the trigger on my Timberwolf was a fair bit heavier.
    While shooting the Timberwolf today it got even heavier. I mean, I had to make sure the bolt was all the way forward in the “Fire” notch, and not in the “Safe” notch, because there was so much resistance to get the rig to fire I thought it was on “Safe”.
    From looking at the schematic, I’m betting the “Sear Engagment” screw has moved, changing sear engagement? I don’t know if turning this screw clockwise or counter-clock-wise increases or decreases sear engagement…but it’s time to find out.
    If anyone here has experience adjusting these triggers, please respond.
    I read something that recommended putting tape across the sides of the trigger block to keep from losing the trigger pins?

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    Diamondback
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    FX Timberwolf trigger problem fixed!

    Got the stock off by removed the 2 hex head screws on either side of the pressure gauge – no need to remove any trigger guard screws.

    I used an allen wrench to adjust the allen screw “B – Sear Engagement Screw (2nd Stage Trigger Adjustment)” in front of the trigger. This screw couldn’t have moved while I was shooting because it was Very hard to turn. It seemed to have a bit of loctite on the threads. I had to ease it back and forth a bit to break it free, and I was about to use some heat because I was afraid I might break the trigger piece it screws into, when it finally loosened enough to turn.

    I did notice that this steel screw seems to be wearing a dimple into the aluminum where the steel screw end sits against the aluminum tube, which would have the same effect as turning the screw anti-clockwise…increasing sear engagement and 2nd stage trigger pull weight. I think I will look for a hard plastic cap to screw onto the end of this adjusting screw to prevent any more steel vs aluminum wear. If it works, I’ll do the same to my Tarantula.

    I worked in small increments when adjusting the trigger, 1/4th of a turn at a time, and after decreasing sear engagement about 1 full turn (turned the allen screw In / Clockwise a total of 1 turn), I turned screw “C – 2nd Stage Trigger Pull Adjusting Screw” about a total of 1 full turn Out / Anti Clockwise.

    The result is a nice, clean let off that’s at a nice weight. It feels a touch lighter and smoother than my Tarantula trigger and passes the bump test. I also made sure to try closing the bolt harder than usual several times to see if it would fire, & it didn’t.

    A related side note, I have a neat Webley Raider which is of similar design that I bought used, and it’s trigger was so light when received that it would fire when closing the bolt, unless the bolt was closed very softly. I added a little bit more sear engagement using this adjustment (turned the “B” screw Anti Clockwise) and now this rig passes the bump test, still has the same light trigger pull, and no longer fires when closing the bolt no matter how forcefully done.

    When I was done I put about 100 pellets downrange with the Timberwolf and it was a pleasure.

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    Yrrah
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    What a satisfying outcome!

    You know the very first sub inch 100 METRE ctc 5 shot group reported was shot with the two shot shuttle version sold here in OZ as the RWS Rapier, same as Timberwolf but no air gauge.  Chris Thomas shot three such groups in the session witnessed by his powder burner club members. The smallest was 17 mm !
     The date was June 2002.
    I followed shortly after with a string of 100 yard sub inch groups with the 8 shot version the RWS Excalibre / Tarantula, but again no air gauge. That rifle will still shoot those small groups whenever conditions are conducive. The 15.9 gr JSB Exacts are its preferred pellet. 

    The skinny barrels, about 11 or 12 mm, on those rifles go against the popular idea that air rifle barrels just have to be thick. But I feel that the O ring bedded muzzle in that muzzle cowl, which is anchored to the very rugged air reservoir, has something to be said for their accuracy. The excellent early LW barrels are also a factor.
    Hang onto those rifles they have a unique place in the history of long range airgunning.   …  Best regards, Harry.

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    spysir
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    ARS used to sell the RWS Rapier here ( U.S.) back when we still ahs some paper print airgun information/ads and as I purchase my first 6 new pre-charged airgubs from Davis I thought they all ( cost over $500.00, and )  came double boxed in a hard case.
     I have seen both models for sale used in the last year between $500 & $600.00 in good condition, seems a deal to me as I enjoy airguns as a hobby and for what they can do and not a firearrm replacement.

     Strictly from aged memory my was a .177 , dead accurate, had no real rifling ( so odd at the time, did they have “smooth twist” back in “RWS” day’s) but odd waves in bore.
    Fit finish balance & price as well as performance was outstanding, hey AND the orings and everything else lasted 10+ years.

     These were great airguns, all the models that , help with a name here, the fellow who worked on this design and original Ripley and some “Logan” airguns were all really solid designs that preformed very well and even in tiny-bore are well worth snatching up at todays value prices.

    John
     

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    Diamondback
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    Greetings Brother Yrrah!
    Yes, it was nice to fiddle with it a bit & get it working better than before. I recently replaced the fill port check valve oring on this rifle, which was another rewarding little tinkering project.
    Amazing shooting by Mr Thomas & yourself. You guys opened shooter’s eyes (and dropped a few jaws) to what these fine rigs can do.
    They certainly are an eye pleasing design that performs. I’ve had some popular shrouded barrel designs give me fits, but this fore & aft anchored FX design is very impressive. It works so well it almost makes me a good shot :o)
    Kindest Regards…Mike

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    Diamondback
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    Hello spysir,
    I vaguely remember some of the printed airgun “must have” fliers before most went online. Wasn’t there a monthly “Airgun Classifieds” flier by a guy named Manny?
    I used to order the Beeman Literature, used gun lists, articles, and of course their catalogs. 
    I don’t know for sure about the type of rifling FX used, but I read somewhere the FX Timberwolf & Tarantula barrels of that time were LW “double honed” barrels & were referred to as “Match Grade”. I believe the “Smooth Twist” is a much more recent FX offering.

    Is the person you were referring to Fredrick Axlesson of FX? Here is some interesting reading:

    https://www.redbubble.com/people/airrifletweaks/writing/8389763-where-it-began-a-breif-history-of-the-fx2000 

    https://www.airrifle.co.za/threads/1099-FYI-story-behind-the-FXA-CNC-Logun-Webley-RWS-clones 

    Kind Regards, db

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