Eating wild pigs. Safe or not?

Forums Hunting Eating wild pigs. Safe or not?

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    ncstan
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    Tularemia is the most common disease contacted from rabbits .The most common signs of infection  in rabbits are white or yellow liver spots or a enlarged purple-red spleen and  or sores on the skin .The infection in humans can be fatal but is easy to treat with antibiotics .Can be contracted by skin or eye contact ,eating meat not cooked to 165 degrees .and by deer fly or tick bites .Can be prevented by wearing gloves,long sleeves,and eye protection when cleaning .Wash arms and hands after cleaning and disinfect  knives and cleanings utensils . .use DEET while hunting .I also spray My hunting pants and shirts with natural pyrethrin and let them dry to prevent tick and insect bites . I treat My clothes again after three washes .Tularemia is also found in other small game rats ,feral and domestic hogs and cattle .Butchers are sometimes infected and tularemia is nick named butchers fever .This being said My family for generations has killed,butchered and ate both wild game and domestic animals .I continue to do also and We had never contracted anything 

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    kmd1984
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    “ncstan”Tularemia is the most common disease contacted from rabbits .The most common signs of infection  in rabbits are white or yellow liver spots or a enlarged purple-red spleen and  or sores on the skin .The infection in humans can be fatal but is easy to treat with antibiotics .Can be contracted by skin or eye contact ,eating meat not cooked to 165 degrees .and by deer fly or tick bites .Can be prevented by wearing gloves,long sleeves,and eye protection when cleaning .Wash arms and hands after cleaning and disinfect  knives and cleanings utensils . .use DEET while hunting .I also spray My hunting pants and shirts with natural pyrethrin and let them dry to prevent tick and insect bites . I treat My clothes again after three washes .Tularemia is also found in other small game rats ,feral and domestic hogs and cattle .Butchers are sometimes infected and tularemia is nick named butchers fever .This being said My family for generations has killed,butchered and ate both wild game and domestic animals .I continue to do also and We had never contracted anything 

    
Or you can just go to Whole Foods and buy some meat, ha ha. Just kidding. Thanks for the info. I had no idea it would involve this much work…

    Kmd

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    Cherub1290
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    I’m sure it’s fine, jusy make sure you cook the meat to a high enough temperature to kill any disease or parasites and wash your hands after handling anything raw.

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    unionrdr
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    Y’all worry to much! Clean/dress the critter properly. Soak in salt water then freeze. Cook till done, but not burnt. Good to go. Too many people think pork & wild game need to be very well done to be safe. Not true in the slightest. I’ve been eating all manner of wild game, fish, mussels & clams since I was a boy. Gotta watch for mercury poisoning in fish, sometimes parasites. Mostly mercury poisoning, which looks like black & blue bruising on fish.

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    Willie14228
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    Any wild animal and i mean any presents a danger if not properly handled and cooked.
    One Key note, Wild pigs Bore more so than sows over 250 and up will start having a stronger game taste. The smell of the raw meat will tell you a lot on how game tasting the pig will be. I will be frank, if the raw meat has sort of a piss smell to it then i would pass it up. the meat is fine but when you start cooking it will get a stronger smell. 
    Never start your hunt without a ice chest full of ice bags and a box of ice cream salt Pork of any kind wild or domestic will go bad very fast. it is important to get the animal field dressed and on ice asap

    Go to your local big animal vet and ask them for some arm gloves. these are the same gloves they use when they do still birth deliveries and other type of issues where they have to reach into the body of cows. Go to Harbor freight and buy the blue or black 7 mil rubber gloves. put on the arm glove then the rubber gloves. 
     Now a good sharp $500 knife….. Nope noda zip zilch my best hog field dressing knife is a walmart $2.00 snap off razor knife I like the 1/2 inch blade Bore hair will dull even the most expensive knife on the market. With a Razor knife you only use the tip to cut the belly skin and start the skinning process. When it starts getting dull break it off and keep going.
    It is important to at minimum field dress a hog as soon as possible and I mean ASAP no more than an hour, after you have gutted them put a bag of ice in the belly and start cooling them down. I will not leave them unskinned no longer than a few hours. They hold a lot of heat and will spoil very fast 
    All Wild pigs need to be skinned, I usually have a hog hung and bled and skinned within three hours of dropping him. 
    I have a big party igloo ice chest. I will dress it down put it in the chest fill the chest the rest of the way with ice and put salt over the ice. 
    open the drain and keep ice and salt on the pig for about 7 days. the salt water that is draining over the skinned pig will help remove the game taste.

    whatever you choose process it yourself or pay someone to do it.
    Wild hog has some unique cooking properties,
    It important to cook slow, and while cook complete you do not want to overcook.
     

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    Tony.fryery
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    They’re safe to eat as long as you thoroughly cook the meat and you use several layers if latex gloves while you’re dressing the hog.

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    Willie14228
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    Around East Texas Wild pigs actually pick up a nutty flavor from the acorns they eat, I love it. 

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    joanr62
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    New Member to this group and I have hunted and eaten wild pig as well with either my Seneca Wingshot ll or the Evanix Max ML.  As long as you cook the meat at 165 degrees, you will be fine. Its when the meat is under cooked that the types of diseases are certain to be there. As long as you cook the meat thru and when dressing, have safety gear on properly, you will be fine. There have been many times when my Battalion had to either hunt for food or live of the land during training and on the battlefield. Eating a wild pig isn’t as bad as having to eat a Camel Spider, I assure you.

    If I’m unable to go hunting for them, I can always call of friend of mine at Broken Arrow Ranch to send me a package of them to me. They have all types of wild game to choose from. As soon as I’m able to, I want to get my freezer stocked up with enough venison and wild game and pig when I have guest over for dinner. Especially my group of guys that come.

    JRicks
    USMC Mjr, (Ret.)

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    fishinwrench
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    This is the damndest discussion I’ve ever witnessed.  
    It’s food, it’s not radioactive waste.  Cut it up, rinse it off, cook it, and eat it !   
    You’ll be fine.  

    Some drunken hillbilly once passed out in a pool of pig blood on a hot summer day and came down with a fever a few days later……Ever since then a bunch of people turned scared of pork.    
    Truth be known, that old hick prolly had 5 dead ticks under his nutsack, rotten teeth and yellow eyes… before he even touched the stupid hog.

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    Scrufhunter
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    “kmd1984”I was going to ask a similar question, so if you don’t mind, let me “high-jack” your thread here for a second. : )
    I have some rabbits where I life, and it makes me feel “better” if I eat what I kill. That said, do the same “rules” apply to rabbits?!
    Thanks.

    
We had the rule of not eating rabbits until the first freeze in AZ. They get alot of ticks and fleas, but a hard freeze usually would kill off the week rabbits and assumably the parasites. We always checked the lungs for white spots. I think it was a sign of bacterial or a fungus infections. Although I’ve eaten rabbits all time of year, never if it had fleas or ticks.
     As far as pigs. I’ve eaten them in few states including SC. As far as I know all the ones I ate where eating a “natural” diet. Mostly farmers crops, that’s why we killed them. I really like them burried in the ground and left to pit roast!

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    Scrufhunter
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    “kmd1984”I was going to ask a similar question, so if you don’t mind, let me “high-jack” your thread here for a second. : )
    I have some rabbits where I life, and it makes me feel “better” if I eat what I kill. That said, do the same “rules” apply to rabbits?!
    Thanks.

    
We had the rule of not eating rabbits until the first freeze in AZ. They get alot of ticks and fleas, but a hard freeze usually would kill off the week rabbits and assumably the parasites. We always checked the lungs for white spots. I think it was a sign of bacterial or a fungus infections. Although I’ve eaten rabbits all time of year, never if it had fleas or ticks.
     As far as pigs. I’ve eaten them in few states including SC. As far as I know all the ones I ate where eating a “natural” diet. Mostly farmers crops, that’s why we killed them. I really like them burried in the ground and left to pit roast!

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    Scrufhunter
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    Those are wild pig chops on the grill in my avatar pic!!!!

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    primaz
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    I was always curious to know if wild hogs skin be eaten like other roasted pigs that are domesticated or are the species way different?  I recently saw some domesticated pigs at a Napa Valley farm and they seemed to have similar amount of hair as a pics of wild hogs? 

    Also reading many of the comments another question is how well does wild hog taste if you have to cook it more well done than a domestic pig or is the doneness not that big of gap?  

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