Eagle Vision Go-Pro Side-Cam w/HERO7 – Focus and Image Settings Tests

Forums Cameras, Videos, & Recording Equipment Eagle Vision Go-Pro Side-Cam w/HERO7 – Focus and Image Settings Tests

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    Chuck26287
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    Finally received my Eagle Vision GoPro Side-Cam kit and got it set up and focused.  I'm still new to this scope video hobby, but here is a short video showing my focus and image settings tests and comparisons.  I was looking for the fine differences and improvements with frame rate, shutter speed, sharpening (both in camera and in post) and post-processing.  I've got a lot to learn, but I'm truly interested in producing the best quality possible.  Coming into this with a photo background really makes you picky when it comes to the video image quality.  Comments and suggestions are very welcome.  Note that it's best viewed at a 1:1 1920 x 1080 HD display.

    Also want to give a shout-out to Hajimoto.  The work he has done and shared publicly really narrowed down my starting areas.  His thread identifying ProTune setting was invaluable in getting descent image quality right at the start.

     

     

     

    • This topic was modified 6 days ago by Chuck26287.
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    coolbananas
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    Wow, 320+ yards – holly mackerel that is a clear picture! 

    I don't recall seeing anything with near that clarity at that distance.

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    Chuck26287
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    coolbananas

    Wow, 320+ yards – holly mackerel that is a clear picture! 

    I don't recall seeing anything with near that clarity at that distance.

    Thanks.  I thought it was pretty good for the distance as well.  The NightForce helps, as it's pretty good glass.  Maxed to 32X is pretty sharp.  Not an ATACR, but definitely the best I've ever been able to afford.  My needs certainly don't require better, I'm just trying to optimize everything to use it to it's full potential.

    I'm heading to work right now, but later today I'll try to post a quick clip showing the clarity at 32X when focused on the notch of a tree branch at the trunk at only about 25-30 yards.  I had to go out further to test, as it was so good in that close you could hardly see differences.

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    Chuck26287
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    Here's another settings comparison video.  All video is shot at 30 frames per second, at a shutter speed of 1/120 second, with sharpness at MEDIUM.  The scenes compare camera color profile settings (FLAT and GOPRO COLOR) and show the image sharpness at both 321 yards and a much closer 28 yards.  Be sure and watch the second tree notch scene for my little photo-bomber.

    What I was interested in was whether highlight and shadow detail was lost when using GOPRO COLOR instead of FLAT.  Hajimoto points out it's usually best to shoot with sharpness set to MEDIUM, then sharpen appropriately in post processing.  I agree whole-heartedly.  I also think the same applies to using FLAT vs GOPRO COLOR for the camera capture color profile.  At least in the vast majority of scene situations, provided you will be editing the footage after shooting it.  I will say that if I was not going to be editing the footage at all, I would likely use both GOPRO COLOR, and HIGH SHARPNESS.  However, since most of my airgun footage is shot to show the slomo effect of the pellet in flight and impacting a target, I'll almost always be in the editing software anyway, so I might as well keep the finer control over how my color processing affects my highlights and shadows.

    If you look at the transformer pole scene when it goes from FLAT to GOPRO COLOR, you see that the in-camera processing boosts the color and contrast to a more pleasing picture as far as color and contrast goes, but it also blows out some highlight detail, and blocks up some shadow detail.  This scene isn't all that great as an example of this, but imagine a scene where a black squirrel was your subject.  Depending on scene content and how the camera reads the exposure, you could easily loose black detail in the fur.  Once that detail is processed out of your video, it's gone.  If captured in FLAT, the detail is there, and when post-processed, you can ensure you don't block-up the shadows (dark subject areas) and loose the detail in your blacks.  Same is true of your highlight detail (white/bright areas).

    Another purpose of this video was to show the clarity achievable at distances closer than the original 321 yards used in the first video. I have to say I was pleased with the bark detail attained at 32X at 28 yards.  I'm going to say I can leave my lens focused where it's at.

    Sorry for the transformer pole scene having so much mirage affect showing.  It's focused, just shooting across an open flat field at a different time of day than the first video of this transformer pole.

    Again, any comments and recommendations are welcome.

     

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 6 days ago by Chuck26287.
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