CenterPoint Spectrum 4-12x44mm FFP Riflescope

Forums Optics, Scopes, Rings, & Mounts CenterPoint Spectrum 4-12x44mm FFP Riflescope

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    knothead
    Participant
    Member

    Any idea what the lines in the reticle represent?
    Thinking I may send this one back as there's no info in the pamphlet that came with it. Sighted at 50 shoots over at 100 on both lines.
    Perhaps I'll put a tape measure down there and see what it shows.

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    Saltlake58
    Participant
    Member

    I checked Crosman's site.  Little information to be honest.  The scope is here:

    https://www.crosman.com/optics/scopes/4-12×44-mm-riflescope

    If you download the manual and look in #7 Maintenance, it says it's an MOA scope with +- 35 MOA windage and elevation.  Turrets are also MOA, so I'd say, it's an MOA scope.  Probably 1 MOA per hash, but better call Crosman to make sure.

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    JimNM
    Participant
    Member

    Your question has some gaps in it.  I will try to fill in what I can.  I have that scope on my .22 cal at 42 fpe.  Note, different speeds and different pellets will yield different results.

    The hash marks represent the same distance on target at 4 power as they do at 12 power, unlike a second focal plane scope.  If at 100 yards, you have 3" between marks at 4 power, you will ha e 3" between the marks at 12 power, also.    For my set up, zero at 50 (and at 15 yards) first hash below crosshair is 80 yards and second hash is 100y.  It is incumbent upon you to figure your drop at different distances.  My highest point is at 25-35 yards at .75 hash above the crosshair.  I have tested and noted holds for 15-110 yards in 5 yard increments.  Know your gun and how it shoots.  There is no way to short cut.

    • This reply was modified 5 days ago by JimNM.
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    JimNM
    Participant
    Member

    https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/ffp-at-4x-8x-and-12x-comparison/

    Take a look at what I show in this thread.

     

    Fwiw, a Crosman tin of .22 CPHP from Walmart is almost exactly 1 mil  radian  at 100 yards  3.6 inches.  A MOA is 1 inch at 100 yards.  Using know sizes at know distance you can decode any s.cope  

     

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    shoot44
    Participant
    Member

    I think something is wrong with Crosman's photos of the reticle and deer at 4 and 12 power. With a FFP scope shouldn't the hash marks be at the same place on the deer at 12 power as they are at 4 power? Looks like the reticle grew more then the deer.

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    JimNM
    Participant
    Member

    shoot44

    I think something is wrong with Crosman's photos of the reticle and deer at 4 and 12 power. With a FFP scope shouldn't the hash marks be at the same place on the deer at 12 power as they are at 4 power? Looks like the reticle grew more then the deer.

    Yes, the editor of the art work made an error with the clip art used.  The scope is a FFP, for sure.

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    JungleShooter
    Participant
    Member

    I’m continually surprised at the low quality of the Crosman webpage. They don’t explain their products well. They misname and mislabel them. And the customer needs to go to other sellers and online stores to find out the info they need – does Crosman feel they need to dumb down the information they present?

     

    I was just looking at this scope yesterday, and wanted to put it on my scope list of specs for 2-12x scopes. But I didn’t. Here’s why.

     

    First of all, they put caps on the turrets – which for me is the manufacturer’s way of saying: “Shooter, zero this scope, and then leave the turrets alone. They don’t withstand frequent adjustments!”

     

    Beside, they made this a FFP scope – and FFP only really makes sense if I shoot with holdovers instead of simply clicking the turrets.

    But for holdovers I need a reticle with some kind of dots or hash marks that allows me to make adjustments for windage and elevation.

     

    This scope has those markings, but the most important ones – the vertical ones below the X for elevation holdovers are not EVENLY SPACED!  Cf. pic, and the three red arrows – the arrows are all the same length….

    This reticle is, I just learned, called a BDC, a bullet drop compensating reticle. And for PB shooters a BDC is calibrated to a common standard cartridge – that has a certain standard muzzle velocity and projectile weight and BC.

    If Crosman doesn’t even tell us in their product manual(!) what cartridge the reticle is calibrated for – than this has got to be the biggest scope joke in a while…!   😂   =>   😲   =>   😭

     

    As our airguns do not have standard muzzle velocities, standard projectile weights, or standard BC, this reticle is NONSENSE for airgunners who want to use hold over and benefit from the FFP. Because we need mil dots or moa hash marks that are evenly spaced out for making our holdovers.

    And the scope is nonsense for airgunners who want to revert to clicking the turrets, as Crosman decided to put turret caps on the scope – with the clear message: “Turrets NOT suitable for daily use!”  😑

     

     

    So, if you already have this scope, here’s one “work around” this nonsense:

    Using your gun’s favorite pellet, zero the gun with the scope at a range suitable to your typical shooting distances.

    Now shoot that pellet at target cards (o pieces of paper with a dot) beyond your far zero distance – spaced out every 5 yards. Aim the cross-hairs always at the bull’s eye.

    After shooting a group, check if the group center coincides with one of the three horizontal hash lines below the cross-hairs. If they do, then you know that for that pellet, at that distance, that horizontal hash mark is your holdover.

    The same can be done for the range up to your near zero.

     

    Have fun. Or sell it!

    Matthias

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    knothead
    Participant
    Member

    Thanks Matthias,

    I figured this out yesterday, I was outside checking the group which unfortunately did not coincide with the lower lines at at distance worthwhile.  I hope to get a little time tomorrow to play with it, but its most likely going back to amazon to be replaced by some real mildot scope, oh yea, with turrets.  

    I'll post my final decision when I make it.

     

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    ptthere
    Participant
    Member

    JungleShooter

    I’m continually surprised at the low quality of the Crosman webpage. They don’t explain their products well. They misname and mislabel them. And the customer needs to go to other sellers and online stores to find out the info they need – does Crosman feel they need to dumb down the information they present?

     

    I was just looking at this scope yesterday, and wanted to put it on my scope list of specs for 2-12x scopes. But I didn’t. Here’s why.

     

    First of all, they put caps on the turrets – which for me is the manufacturer’s way of saying: “Shooter, zero this scope, and then leave the turrets alone. They don’t withstand frequent adjustments!”

     

    Beside, they made this a FFP scope – and FFP only really makes sense if I shoot with holdovers instead of simply clicking the turrets.

    But for holdovers I need a reticle with some kind of dots or hash marks that allows me to make adjustments for windage and elevation.

     

    This scope has those markings, but the most important ones – the vertical ones below the X for elevation holdovers are not EVENLY SPACED!  Cf. pic, and the three red arrows – the arrows are all the same length….

    This reticle is, I just learned, called a BDC, a bullet drop compensating reticle. And for PB shooters a BDC is calibrated to a common standard cartridge – that has a certain standard muzzle velocity and projectile weight and BC.

    If Crosman doesn’t even tell us in their product manual(!) what cartridge the reticle is calibrated for – than this has got to be the biggest scope joke in a while…!   😂   =>   😲   =>   😭

     

    As our airguns do not have standard muzzle velocities, standard projectile weights, or standard BC, this reticle is NONSENSE for airgunners who want to use hold over and benefit from the FFP. Because we need mil dots or moa hash marks that are evenly spaced out for making our holdovers.

    And the scope is nonsense for airgunners who want to revert to clicking the turrets, as Crosman decided to put turret caps on the scope – with the clear message: “Turrets NOT suitable for daily use!”  😑

     

     

    So, if you already have this scope, here’s one “work around” this nonsense:

    Using your gun’s favorite pellet, zero the gun with the scope at a range suitable to your typical shooting distances.

    Now shoot that pellet at target cards (o pieces of paper with a dot) beyond your far zero distance – spaced out every 5 yards. Aim the cross-hairs always at the bull’s eye.

    After shooting a group, check if the group center coincides with one of the three horizontal hash lines below the cross-hairs. If they do, then you know that for that pellet, at that distance, that horizontal hash mark is your holdover.

    The same can be done for the range up to your near zero.

     

    Have fun. Or sell it!

    Matthias

    I was surprised when I first learned that CenterPoint was selling a FFP scope. I think they were less concerned on features and function, and more concerned on just being able to say "We sell a FFP scope" to make a couple of bucks.

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    JungleShooter
    Participant
    Member

    Knothead, these last few weeks I’ve combed through the major scope brands for the specs of scopes that have around 12x magnification at the top end, and 2x at the bottom end.

    The following specs were requirements, or at least important to my purchase decision:
    • Price $300-500, with some extras
    • Min. Parallax = 10y
    • Exposed turrets (≠capped turrets)
    • Turrets and reticle coincide: either MOA/MOA or MIL/MIL
    • Reticle with plenty of MOA or MIL dots/ hash marks
    • Turret Adjustment Range: 50MOA or more
    • FFP or SFP
    • IR or not
    • Weight
    • Tube: 30mm
    • Field of View

    My search for that particular magnification range has come up almost empty.  😐
     

    The next larger magnification ranges have plenty of scopes to choose from, and they all satisfy most or all the listed requirements.

     

    There are TWO comprehensive scope model comparison tables with specs:

    ● 3-16x  (4-16, 3-18x)
    https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/scope-model-comparison-with-specifications-3-16x-300-500/

    ● 6-24x  (5-25x, 4-20x)
    https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/scope-model-comparison-with-specifications-6-24x-300-500/

    I hope these can be helpful.  😊

    Matthias

     

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