Cane Toad eradication

Forums Hunting Cane Toad eradication

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    TopendGeo
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    Ilive in a part of Australia that’s been invaded by Cane Toads.. When I first started living and working up North, I used to like seeing the Quolls (marsupial cat) and varieties of snakes (OK, I liked the pythons…the taipans + brown-snakes not so much) but since the arrival of the cursed toads, I rarely see a snake and I can’t remember when I last saw a Quoll. So I dusted off my old FX Timberwolf, replaced the seals and went out to see what I could do…After a couple of months shooting I went from getting 20 or 30 a night, see pic to just 2-5 toads, then I started seeing green treefrogs again, then the snakes made a comeback (I nearly trod on one…). All the experts said shooting toads won’t get rid of them from Australia and I guess they’re probably right, but shooting them most certainly CAN remove them from the little bit of Australia that I shoot on….I shoot mostly at 25-35 meters and with a .22 timberwolf using crow-magnums, I’ve fitted one of those little LED torches with an elastic band, this setup lets me brain-shoot the toads, Id love one of the new FX’s with more than 2 shots, but heck, the Timberwolf is just too good to justify the extra expense (for now )

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    MattChastain
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    Good shooting. Kill as many of those nasty invasive buggers as you can. Wish i could help you out.

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    FVA
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    Good shooting.  Sounds like a good time.  Surprised those toads have an impact on the snakes.

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    jimreed1948
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    Wow, thats a lot of toads.  I remembe the name Cane Toad for some reason, but can’t remember the story behind it right now.  In my travels I have seen them before.  At times there were so many on the road it made it hard to drive and we had to slow down.  It made the road very slippery after they had been run over a few times.

    Since they carry a poison of sorts, I guess they’re you cannot eat them.  Frog leggs are very good, but I don’t thing I would try these.  Behind their ears lie the partoid glands, which usually causes their head to appear swollen. These glands are used for defense against predators. The parotid gland produces milky toxic secretion or poison that is dangerous to many species.  This poison primarily affects the functioning of the heart. Intoxication is painful, but is usually not fatal for humans.  However, it does have some effects, such as burning of the eyes and hands, and skin irritation.

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    ninja
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    Good going TopendGeo.

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    Michael
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    Nice hunt

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    EXZIVER
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    Holy frigging frogs Batman!  Nice shooting..

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    Yrrah
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    Your Timberwolf/Rapier  is one of the best air rifles ever made.
    It was a Rapier that Chris Thomas from Bendigo shot the very first 5 shot sub inch 100 metres/ 109+ yards  groups – in an exhibition in front of his C/F benchrest Club in June 2002. He shot three such groups the best was 17 mm ctc.
    I met Chris at a silhouette shoot in Canberra just after that ( he won the shoot). My own such shooting began a little while after with the 8 shot repeater model of the same rifle, The Excalibre. It had shot over 70 such groups when I stopped recording and started doing the same with the BSA Hornet. I still shoot the Excalibre when I need to eliminate a warren of rabbits. Otherwise I use single shot Hornets and FX Elite.

    Look after that rifle. It possibly came from Lewis Reinhold of the ther Beeman Australia. There will never be any more. They are superb. But get some JSB 15.9 gr pellets for it and see what its true accuracy is. The Crow Magnums are fine for your cane toads to 30 yards, but you cannot shoot anywhere near the accuracy out at 50 yards and beyond – they just spiral out of control. The H&N Barracudas also shoot well. That is what Chris was shooting if memory serves me right.
    The toads are into WA and down over the NSW border in some places now. They travel on semis . Good shooting and Best regards, Harry.
     

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    greenterror
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    Good shooting, toads are all over that gate.

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    TopendGeo
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    Turns out you can eat them….not that I’d recommend it, they’re pretty chewy and you’ve got to be careful not get any of the bufotoxin mixed in (it’s not just from the glands behind the ears, it’s all through the skin) ..We skinned them and took the legs, washed them and fried them up in some butter never ate anymore, but they make excellent garden fertilizer….I got the rife from greenfield air-arms imported new back in early 2000 something… and indeed it loves the JSB’s, My favorite trick is to put a pellet up on the fence at 27m and shoot it off in one shot (resting on the BBQ…lol)…astounds the bystanders, this thing is that accurate. Headshots and heartshots on the toads, but headshots are my favorite (see below)..Looking for a new scope as the one I got with it ingested water :( ….I bought an Air-King but it seems to have a wondering zero as an unexpected added “feature” …

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    Nomadic Pirate
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    GREAT !!!!

    We have them here too, ………on drizzling nights I go out with a green light on my rifle and have quite a bit of fun blasting them buggers :) :)

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    ninja
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    I use my BBQ as a bench rest too.

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    skygear
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    In bermuda we had/ have them. They are a tourist attraction, we sold shirts that say ‘ROAD TOAD’ and have a pic of a run over cane toad. We would run around the island shooting them with our slingshots. We would try to line our deadfall traps for the wild boar (razors) with sticks dipped in the glands of the frogs after we killed them. 

    Good on you. I like seeing indigenous species making a comeback in an area. 

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    Hepotter
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    I admit to being puzzled, and a bit curious….how did you convince them to line up like that for the photograph?  That’s not a natural act for a toad!  Seriously, are you some kind of “Toad Whisperer”???

    Further, did you give them to the count of ten, after the photo, before you began shooting?  Seems the sporting thing to do, given how they cooperated with your photograph and all.

     

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    frambonian
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    “Hepotter”I admit to being puzzled, and a bit curious….how did you convince them to line up like that for the photograph?  That’s not a natural act for a toad!  Seriously, are you some kind of “Toad Whisperer”???

    Further, did you give them to the count of ten, after the photo, before you began shooting?  Seems the sporting thing to do, given how they cooperated with your photograph and all.

     

    
LOL!!!

    Kudos to taking care of over-populations of “rodents” of all sorts to bring back the natural order of things. 

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    Bullfrog
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    We have them in the extreme south of Florida but thankfully most of the state gets too cold in the winter to allow them to expand northward.

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    Paulcat
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    Far more effective than a golf club or cricket bat.Nice to see you doing your bit to restore the natural ecology up north.It’s nice when you see the native species starting to return.Keep it up.

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    Strikey
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    “Paulcat”Far more effective than a golf club or cricket bat.

    Nope, still prefer my 5 Iron, good  swing practice😈😄
     

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