Buying a compressor, what is best choice…

Forums Air Tanks, Pumps, Compressors, & Filters Buying a compressor, what is best choice…

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    2muchair4leyla
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    High brettl I've been working with and on all types of air compressors since I was 17 here's something to keep in mind when searching no matter what air compressor you buy you'll always need a filter oil coalescer and dryer at the outlet  filters work by removing saturated vapor(small water droplets)  from the air the lower the micron the better the filter and more expensive oil coalescer same deal with alot of little pockets and channels to trap oil droplets then a dryer refrigerated (cools air to its condensation temp forming and removing more water droplets) or a dessicant tower(absorbs water through capillary condensation slower process the more dessicant and longer the air contact with the dessicant the more it's effective) to dry the gas that hasn't vaporized, all are selected based on psi and cfm that being said the lower the micron the higher the price the higher the outlet pressure the higher the price the higher the cfm the higher the price of these components so if you buy a high pressure air compressor don't be fooled by the 400.00 filters they sale to dry and clean the air going into your tank or gun it's a filter not drying air just removing already formed water droplets and if you check the micron its probably not even rated (5to1 micron is a high quality filter) its not a coalescer so the vaporized oil passes right through eventually taking out your orings and building sludge in you gun Imho bypass any high pressure air compressors get a booster buy a shop compressor and some affordable high quality filters and acoalescer you may not be able to afford a dryer but you'll have a 90% cleaner and dryer gun in the end .

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    STO
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    I don't want to leave Stoti high and dry here, I too have gotten multiple reports of the daystate / Coltri compressors failing prematurely. It's hard to convert that into useful data, because I have no information on the prevalence of these daystate compressors, but clearly they're not completely without fault. Any product line has some defect rate, so it is hard to know what to make of this. *Shrug* 

     

    If you research, there are failure reports for just about everything that makes four and a half thousand psi air. So the question I would ask is: are you comfortable repairing/rebuilding  the machine yourself, or are you willing to ship the machine back to someone, probably at your expense? And that should probably be an important factor in choosing what compressor you want, basically doing a pre-mortem and answering the question of what happens if something goes wrong. 

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    Rodeo
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    Completely agree with STO.  I recently purchased a compressor that failed the 5th time I used it.  I followed instructions for the unit exactly, did not over stress it and took every precaution to ensure longevity.  It still went belly up.   I am mechanically inclined but the complexity of this unit would make me think twice about attempting a repair.  Luckily it was still within the return period and the vendor issued me a return shipping label.  Currently waiting for my refund.  I am going to buy another compressor and one of my top considerations is now parts availability and  *rebuildability*.   I now feel that it is not a matter of "if" it going to need service but can I repair it "when" it needs service.

    Edit:  It was NOT a Daystate compressor that I purchased.  I am agreeing with STO on keeping in mind the (possible/eventual) need for repairs.   Sorry if that sent any negativity Daystate's way.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Rodeo.
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    Brettl
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    The more I read this thread the more I realize maybe I shouldn’t be buying a compressor.

     Are you saying that gunk is going to go into my gun from these compressors?  Do they not have the proper filters on them to get rid of moisture and oil? 

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    Humdinger
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    One or two guys chime in repeatedly about having a problem with a Daystate LC-110 and all of a sudden it's junk. The truth is that owners with no issues don't chime in like owners who have problems.  I'd be willing to wager that since AofA started selling Daystate LC-110's they've outsold Omega compressors 5 to 1.   I'm not an engineer but I've had lots of experience with PCP compressors over the years.  I trade compressors like some guys trade PCP's.  I'm always looking for the  best bang for my buck and my priority is reliability and low maintenance.  That being said, I have never been a fan of the Omega compressors because they are overpriced for their basic mechanical design.  They attract buyers with attractive bells and whistles but it is a mechanized hand pump in a box.   An Omega uses rubber o-ring seals which are extremely complicated to replace by an individual owner unless he is very patient and mechanically inclined.   100 hours on an Omega provides a lot less fills than 100 hours on an LC-110.  The LC-110 is based upon a proven dive compressor design that Coltri has sold for over two decades.  It runs quietly, it isn't over driven, and it runs on 110 volts.  It is a stout design that will give many more years of service than an Omega.  Anyone who understands compressor design and wants a long term compressor should choose a Daystate LC-110 over an Omega.   The LC-110 is the best bang for the buck compressor for airgunners on the market today.  The Omega is the most overpriced for it's design and lack of durability.   Engines, and dive compressors are sealed with steel o-rings.  No rubber sealed compressor will last as long without much more servicing.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Humdinger.
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    bandg
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    Humdinger

    One or two guys chime in repeatedly about having a problem with a Daystate LC-110 and all of a sudden it's junk. The truth is that owners with no issues don't chime in like owners who have problems.  I'd be willing to wager that since AofA started selling Daystate LC-110's they've outsold Omega compressors 5 to 1.   I'm not an engineer but I've had lots of experience with PCP compressors over the years.  I trade compressors like some guys trade PCP's.  I'm always looking for the  best bang for my buck and my priority is reliability and low maintenance.  That being said, I have never been a fan of the Omega compressors because they are overpriced for their basic mechanical design.  They attract buyers with attractive bells and whistles but it is a mechanized hand pump in a box.   An Omega uses rubber o-ring seals which are extremely complicated to replace by an individual owner unless he is very patient and mechanically inclined.   100 hours on an Omega provides a lot less fills than 100 hours on an LC-110.  The LC-110 is based upon a proven dive compressor design that Coltri has sold for over two decades.  It runs quietly, it isn't over driven, and it runs on 110 volts.  It is a stout design that will give many more years of service than an Omega.  Anyone who understands compressor design and wants a long term compressor should choose a Daystate LC-110 over an Omega.   The LC-110 is the best bang for the buck compressor for airgunners on the market today.  The Omega is the most overpriced for it's design and lack of durability.   Engines, and dive compressors are sealed with steel o-rings.  No rubber sealed compressor will last as long without much more servicing.

    Can't disagree with your basic premise here.  But it seems that your first two sentences could well apply to the Hatsan Lightning compressor rollout as well.   And many have posted about their satisfaction with long term use of the Omega compressors recently.  Personally, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a Daystate, it is probably all one would ever need.  But the Hatsan and the Omega may be all some other folks need.  

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    bubblerboy64
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    Some times you have to accept the facts.   These things are consumables  The guns the compressors obviously the pellets.  This stuff ain’t cheap either.    Powder burns just as bad.  

    I own a Daystate 110  it works. For how long who knows.  I can’t afford a $10000 dive compressor this Daystate is the most reasonable compromise I could make. If it breaks I’ll fix it or buy another. I can’t see that there is enough “there” to justify the $2000 price tag but I shoot way too much to pump.

    it can get frustrating trying to make these purchases .  Buy one enjoy it and figure you’ll deal with it as need be.  Lots of guys use those Chinese units.  Might be ok but I decided it was worth it to me to not have to mess with cooling water and all that. 

    Buy an omega or the Daystate get on with life 

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    bandg
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    bubblerboy64

    Some times you have to accept the facts.   These things are consumables  The guns the compressors obviously the pellets.  This stuff ain’t cheap either.    Powder burns just as bad.  

    I own a Daystate 110  it works. For how long who knows.  I can’t afford a $10000 dive compressor this Daystate is the most reasonable compromise I could make. If it breaks I’ll fix it or buy another. I can’t see that there is enough “there” to justify the $2000 price tag but I shoot way too much to pump.

    it can get frustrating trying to make these purchases .  Buy one enjoy it and figure you’ll deal with it as need be.  Lots of guys use those Chinese units.  Might be ok but I decided it was worth it to me to not have to mess with cooling water and all that. 

    Buy an omega or the Daystate get on with life 

    Or a Hatsan or a Bauer or an Air Venturi or ….      Lots of options.

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    kcatx
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    I looked long and hard at a variety of compressors, bought a Yong Heng clone (Vevor– probably the worst one due to the piston design).   After fixing the Vevor a few times (not hard, just takes a little time) I said screw it and bought a Shoebox.  No water, ice packs, etc to deal with, set and forget.       Given the Shoebox's long history and ease of rebuilding when necessary I doubt I'll ever need anything else.    The longer run times aren't a big deal, as I can start it and leave it running in my office (or work right next to it– it's quiet), whereas with the Vevor I was needing to vent the moisture every 3-5 minutes.

     

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    pinballjon
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    This is just an observation on the Daystate 110.  When I was shopping for a compressor I looked at all the options. I noticed that Coltri dealers don't advertise or in some cases sell the 110 volt version that Daystate has.

    Also the Daystate 110 only has 3 stages of compression. The 220 volt Coltri has 4 stages. Does it make a difference? Probably as the 4 stage unit doesn't work each stage as much as the 4 stage unit.

    I also found that the Coltri dealer in Florida had a sale on the 220 volt unit. It was test run before they shipped it. It came full of oil and ready to run except for the airgun compatable Foster adpter fitting. It shipped by truck in a very sturdy box banded on a wood pallet.

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    2muchair4leyla
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    Brettl

    The more I read this thread the more I realize maybe I shouldn’t be buying a compressor.

     Are you saying that gunk is going to go into my gun from these compressors?  Do they not have the proper filters on them to get rid of moisture and oil? 

    Some compressors come with filter and oil coalescer along with a condensate drain they only remove around 30% of oil and moisture in the air so yes unless you buy high quality filter and oil coalescer which once you enter the 3000 psi range anything effective would cost more than the compressor for example I have a 36000.00 screw type air compressor I take care of it has an integral coalescer 8micron intake prefilter and refrigerant dryer it runs 35 [email protected] it's replacement coalescer costs 600.00 at the outlet of this compressor I still had to add a 1micron filter and 700.00 oil coalescer to get clean air oil vapor is the hardest thing to remove from air and the hotter the air the harder 3000psi air is very hot compared to 135psi air and there for will vaporize more oil and it will be even harder to remove also with the high pressure refrigerated dryer are not built for that kind of pressure so you have to have a dessicant tower Wich are much less effective and a lot slower but without a dryer your also introducing acidic water into your gun and tank acidic water leeches aluminium and even low quality stainless which in time will affect the integrity of a carbon fiber tank as it's got an aluminum bladder so best to got to a dive shop or get a booster and use nitrogen if not you guns gonna need to be sent in for some serious rehab after a few years of use but it's the 4500psi tanks I'd be more worried about thus far most airgunner went to dive shops but with this new wave of incompetent do it your self fill stations it's only a matter of time before corroded bottles start exploding most guys on here only worry about how long they're compressor will last and fill time then buy a 400.00 filter I don't even think has a micron range with about 6 oz of dessicant and call it a dryer trouble is coming don't buy into it brother

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    Brian10956
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    Because of the damage that bad air can do to a PCP I’m very wary of purchasing a rifle used as I see too many people using no moisture/oil measures to their air I don’t want that time bomb. Even what I use, the Alpha filter in which I use an upgraded filter media cartridge approved for scuba diving is not as good as systems the Navy Was using 50 years ago.

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    Brettl
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    The thought that my gun will be ruined by all of these compressors without expensive filters is disturbing….

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    bandg
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    Brettl

    The thought that my gun will be ruined by all of these compressors without expensive filters is disturbing….

    Buying a dive quality compressor capable of breathing quality air should prevent this.  Alternatively, spend more money to add improved filtration to one of the "other" type of compressors available.  Always a choice to be made.   And that is assuming that the mentioned concern is actually an issue.  Not sure myself.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by bandg.
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    Brettl
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     All the videos that I watch and all the reviews don’t speak of anything about getting more filtration.  They basically say that it’s plug-and-play. 

    I used a hill pump for years with that little trap on the side with no issues and to hear that if I spend 1500.00 it will ruin my gun, that stinks! 

     All I want is something that is a little to low maintenance and easy to use,  I don’t want to be a compressor expert, I just want to shoot and it seems that just might not be an option  😵

    Maybe that why I still love springers, just the simplicity of it all…… 

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Brettl.
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    2muchair4leyla
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    this is my basement air dryer

    well I got 2 of the this one is big enough to supply air to my altaros booster at max capacity though this is a 2400.0 piece of kit the compressor burnt out in it and I got it for nothing took the compressor from an old freezer and now I'm golden.

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    2muchair4leyla
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    I'll add a 120.00 1 micron filter to the inlet feed it with a dry piston shop compressor so as to not have to worry about oil vapor 200.00

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    2muchair4leyla
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    add all that to and 700.00 altaros booster https://youtu.be/YlA5GiomqNo and you have clean dry air 

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    2muchair4leyla
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    of course you'll need a brand spanking new 6.8l tank to put it in 211.00 with fill station please don't buy anyone's old corroded bottles 

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    2muchair4leyla
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    then just fill your trusty clean dry and superbly accurate air and your in business 

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