BSA R10 MK2 first thoughts & comparison to AA S510

Forums PCP Airguns BSA R10 MK2 first thoughts & comparison to AA S510

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    LDP
    Participant
    Member

    I recently bought a BSA R10 MK2 so I have been running it thru its paces. I figured I would do a short comparison between the R10 and my S510 carbine. It made sense to compare the two because the R10 and S510 rifles seem to be two that people have a hard time deciding which one to get. I end it with a video that shows typical accuracy from both rifles @ 50 yds & 100 yds. I left the shooting completely un cut so there is no doubt about how the rifles performed without bias for one or the other. If you are just interested in the 100 yd shots that starts at the 4 min mark.

    My thoughts on the R10 MK2 vs S510:

    The R10 is just the right size, perfect balance and weight. Its a light weight rifle coming in at 7.3 lbs un scoped. If you dont add a huge heavy scope it will still be under 8.5 lbs. You can change the oem bottle for a carbon fiber bottle if you want to shave weight and add shots.

    The size of the R10 makes it an easy all day carry rifle in the woods for hunting.

    My S510 carbine matches up to the R10 in size, weight, and handling but the S510 is a carbine not a full size rifle. Does that mean the R10 is actually a carbine ;D
    I haven’t looked at every rifles specs but I do know the R10 is quite a bit smaller than the Air Arms S510/S410 full size rifles. I am willing to bet it would be hard to find another full size rifle that is smaller than the R10. That is with the R10 using a screw on ldc instead of the factory shroud. With the factory shroud its only a couple inches longer than the ldc so its still a nice size rifle that handles easily in the field.

    Stock design: BSA did a good job of the design and shape of the stock. The checkering is very clean and does what its suppose to do. The R10 stock fits the shooter very good and makes for easy off hand shooting and comfortable bench shooting. The stock on the AAS510 is a nice stock but I am going to have to go with the R10 as the winner here. The R10 stock looks better and fits a little better.

    When comparing the actions of both rifles the R10 has a smooth working bolt but the side lever of the S510 is so smooth and easy to operate its the winner for best action.
    The R10 isnt hard to operate so its not losing because its bad. The S510 side lever is just that good.

    Magazine: I have to go with the S510 magazine as the winner. This is a tough one because both have good and bad points. The S510 magazine has never given me any trouble but it doesnt hold the pellet in the magazine. If you tilt the S510 magazine when its full it will drop the pellet thats ready to be loaded. The R10 secures the pellet allowing you to put a fully loaded mag into your pocket. I have had my .177 BSA magazine give me trouble and thats the reason the R10 loses this category. The .22 mag has been flawless but I just dont have full confidence in the design at this point. Both magazines are large enough to use the heavier .22 cal pellets.

    Trigger: Both rifles have an excellent trigger thats adjustable. The R10 does win in the trigger department because it has more adjustments than the S510. Both rifles have first and second stage adjustment. The R10 also has adjustments for the trigger shoe angle, Height and the ability to adjust the distance of the trigger blade from the shooter.

    Shroud: The R10 wins here also when comparing straight from the box. The S510 carbine isnt loud but its not as quiet as the R10 straight from the box.

    Power adjustment: The S510 wins here. The R10 and S510 both have power adjustment but the S510 is super easy to adjust. The S510 has the external adjustable power that makes adjusting easy and the S510 will go from sub 12 fpe to 30 fpe in .22 with a quick turn of the power wheel. The R10 requires the action to be removed from the stock and the pre load to be adjusted.

    Accuracy: This is a tough one and maybe there is no clear winner. Both are very accurate and you guys have seen my videos of the S510 taking small targets out at 100 yds. The R10 has proven itself out to 100 yds as well. If the shooter does their part both rifles will put the pellet where it needs to go. 50 yd shooting is boring with each rifle. Both rifles are capable of hits at 100 yds on starling size targets. The accuracy is so close at least with my two rifles that I have to say this ones a draw.

    overall impression is that the R10 gives you more rifle for the cost than the S510. Its a very close race but the R10 wins a couple of key points.

    #1: The R10 is cheaper
    #2: The R10 comes with a regulator
    #3: The stock on the R10 is better designed and comes standard with sling swivel studs. If the rifle is a hunting rifle going into the woods I like to have sling swivel studs. Its nice to be able sling your rifle occasionally in the field plus having studs allows you to equip a bipod easily for use in the field.
    #4: The R10 has a better shot count and more consistent due to the regulator. Having a higher shot count allows you to go hunting without worrying about needing to fill or carry a bottle into the field. Being regulated it has better shot to shot consistency which helps with accuracy. accuracy is one of the most if not the most important feature in a hunting rifle.

    So the R10 is my pick at the end of the day but the S510 is no slouch and is a great hunting rifle. You really cant go wrong with either but the R10 has it all IMHO for a hunting rifle.

    I see people getting to caught up with how accurate the BSA R10 & S510 are. You see posts where people worry if they will hit targets at 150 yds or will they win a bench rest match. Lets not forget these are pure hunting rifles and excellent ones at that.

    These two rifles were never designed as bench rest rifles for competition. They both have stellar accuracy and perform very good but lets not forget their true calling. These two rifles are killing machines and will serve any hunter/ pester very well.

    These are just my opinions so get out there and buy one or both and see for your self why they are two of the most highly regarded hunting rifles you can buy.
     
    Thanks for reading my posts and watching my videos. I hope you enjoyed this comparison between two rifles that are among the best you can buy.

    Here is the video I made comparing the accuracy of both rifles. I left the shooting sequences uncut to show nothing was cherry picked or shot 10 times and edited to show different results. There are a couple of curse words in the video so any of our younger members that want to watch get it cleared by your parents/guardian first. Its not full of cussing but there are probably two or three towards the end of the videoo:)

     

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    cahil_2
    Participant
    Member

    Nice review.  I have an S510 and it is 43 inches which I believe the R10 measures also.  If it was shorter I would buy one.  In comparison an FX 400 is only 40 and 1/2 inches long.  I want my next rifle to be around 40 inches.  

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    LDP
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    Thank you!
    Cahil you are correct. I mention the R10 is shorter if you remove the factory shroud and use a screw on suppressor. My S510 carbine is shorter than the R10 but in order to get the S510 as quiet as my R10 with the suppressor I have to add a suppressor to the S510 carbine bringing it to 44″. If the S510 carbine is quiet enough out of the box for your needs then it is shorter by appx 5″.  

     I probably could have worded things better when mentioning the length. I didnt research other rifle lengths that im not familiar with but I am surprised the FX400 is that short. The FX 400 would make for a nice rifle to use in the woods at that length. 

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    HauntedMyst
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    LDP, I agree with you about the action.  The BSA cocking action is an old design by now and I wish they would come out with a side lever like the 510.   I had a 410 and the metal work seemed nicer.  BSA’s are very easy to work on.  I also swapped out the shroud for an LDC.  It not only looks better but a well made LDC is more effective.

    If you want an even shorter R10, you can pick up an  Ultra barrel on airgun spares and swap it out in about 30 minutes.   Makes a nice compact gun.  Without any other adjustments, it will shoot around 23fps which is still more than enough for squirrels and birds.  
     

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    LDP
    Participant
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    “HauntedMyst”LDP, I agree with you about the action.  The BSA cocking action is an old design by now and I wish they would come out with a side lever like the 510.   I had a 410 and the metal work seemed nicer.  BSA’s are very easy to work on.  I also swapped out the shroud for an LDC.  It not only looks better but a well made LDC is more effective.

    If you want an even shorter R10, you can pick up an  Ultra barrel on airgun spares and swap it out in about 30 minutes.   Makes a nice compact gun.  Without any other adjustments, it will shoot around 23fps which is still more than enough for squirrels and birds.  
     

    
Some people prefer the classic bolt and I dont mind them but a good side lever cant be beat. I agree the metal work on the AA rifles is a little better than the BSA. I think the ability to switch some parts on the BSA rifles to tweak them is over looked by most or they just dont know it can be done. I have a BSA S10 MK2 in .177 that was originally a FAC so it has the 18″ or 18.5″ barrel or whatever its suppose to be. I rebuilt the reg into the non FAC reg and tuned it for 10.6 fpe. Its a very accurate rifle and has a high shot count. I think the best replacement for the old S10 would be the R10 with the shorter ultra barrel and tuned for 10 – 11 fpe. I think that would be a sweet little carbine.

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    Michael
    Keymaster
    Keymaster

    Nice review. + accuracy for your effort.

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    Cliff_Allen
    Participant
    Member

    Awesome write up LDP! I know it takes some time and planning to put that much info into a write up and video, nicely done! You’re findings between the BSA and S-510 pretty much mirror mine. Slight edge to the bsa in accuracy and definite advantage to the BSA in price vs features. Both great guns but I don’t have the S-510 anymore.  😉

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    LDP
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    Thank you guys! I really appreciate the kind words!

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