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Broken Stock Repair?

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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    Yesterday I dropped a beloved gun while cocking. The result is a fracture of the beech stock that is only half way through,  but I am in the need of someone capable of fixing my stupidity. It will be difficult for me to photograph because I am limited by my phone, lol.

     

    Any suggestions??????

     

    • This topic was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    Found a guy named "stock doc".  Anybody use him or have an "in house" option here??

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    bf1956
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +6

    Get some epoxy, take the action out and open up the fracture carefully to allow the adhesive. Then wrap a compression band around it, you might need to remove excessive adhesive. The longer the cure time the better. You can do this, good luck!

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    SteveKralsAround
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    United States
    Accuracy: +8

    bf1956

    Get some epoxy, take the action out and open up the fracture carefully to allow the adhesive. Then wrap a compression band around it, you might need to remove excessive adhesive. The longer the cure time the better. You can do this, good luck!

    Word for word ; 

    What he said .    

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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    bf1956

    Get some epoxy, take the action out and open up the fracture carefully to allow the adhesive. Then wrap a compression band around it, you might need to remove excessive adhesive. The longer the cure time the better. You can do this, good luck!

    Thank you.  Let's see how it goes!

     

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    bltefft
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    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +8

    Glenroiland

    bf1956

    Get some epoxy, take the action out and open up the fracture carefully to allow the adhesive. Then wrap a compression band around it, you might need to remove excessive adhesive. The longer the cure time the better. You can do this, good luck!

    Thank you.  Let's see how it goes!

     

    Keep us up on your repair.  It ought to work.  I recently cut down (shortened) the shoulder stock of one of my Crosman 1322 pistols so my 7-year old grandson could shoot it properly.  Before I cut it, he'd place the "too-long" stock under his arm (in hs armpit) and end up shooting high many a time.  I used Gorilla glue epoxy to reattach the cut ends and it is a solid fix at this time.

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    Glenroiland
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    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    Well.  Had to shift to the D48 for some pesting.  I forgot how much I like the 48…

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    Fischer
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +5

    Glenroiland

    Well.  Had to shift to the D48 for some pesting.  I forgot how much I like the 48…

    Never knew about the D48 until getting to shoot the D54.

    Both of these Diana rifles are really nice side levers.

    I usually hate a sidelever but when I cock the .20 JSB HEAVIES behind the Titan Spring there is way more power and accuracy I USUALLY need!

    So I "shift" to other air rifles in Beech or Walnut or the Hyuda stock on the Eliminator Theoben.

    I think any wood you have on your favorite rifle is worth saving and I used to use a compound called "Micro Bed" to repair or glass fill a rifle bed.

    I haven't had to use that stuff so long I have no more and all my rifles in whatever wood origin never suffer cracks or splits because I use Schaftol from GE as their "stock oil" instead of Boiled Linseed Oil.

    Anyway, with the crack now I can say I've used Gorilla Glue(!) to repair a faulty buttstock screw on my HW98 .20 bought way before the "new" ones. 

    Save everything the way YOU want it with Gorilla Glue or any modern day epoxy and forget about it!

    Kindly,

    John

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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    Fischer

    Glenroiland

    Well.  Had to shift to the D48 for some pesting.  I forgot how much I like the 48…

    Never knew about the D48 until getting to shoot the D54.

    Both of these Diana rifles are really nice side levers.

    I usually hate a sidelever but when I cock the .20 JSB HEAVIES behind the Titan Spring there is way more power and accuracy I USUALLY need!

    So I "shift" to other air rifles in Beech or Walnut or the Hyuda stock on the Eliminator Theoben.

    I think any wood you have on your favorite rifle is worth saving and I used to use a compound called "Micro Bed" to repair or glass fill a rifle bed.

    I haven't had to use that stuff so long I have no more and all my rifles in whatever wood origin never suffer cracks or splits because I use Schaftol from GE as their "stock oil" instead of Boiled Linseed Oil.

    Anyway, with the crack now I can say I've used Gorilla Glue(!) to repair a faulty buttstock screw on my HW98 .20 bought way before the "new" ones. 

    Save everything the way YOU want it with Gorilla Glue or any modern day epoxy and forget about it!

    Kindly,

    John

    I forgot I put the diana away shooting about 1/2 inch high.  I had been shooting it more for groups than sighting it in. I actually had to take my first follow up shot.  Now its sighted in.  

     

    I can't believe how smooth its shooting.  I think the shot cycle is a ton longer than the sig……I didn't even hear the thud when the pellet hit the chest.  I think the shot cycle was long enough to cover the sound.  I didn't hear it on the follow up, or on the second pest I hit….but boy I really am glad I have the d48.

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    bltefft

    Glenroiland

    bf1956

    Get some epoxy, take the action out and open up the fracture carefully to allow the adhesive. Then wrap a compression band around it, you might need to remove excessive adhesive. The longer the cure time the better. You can do this, good luck!

    Thank you.  Let's see how it goes!

     

    Keep us up on your repair.  It ought to work.  I recently cut down (shortened) the shoulder stock of one of my Crosman 1322 pistols so my 7-year old grandson could shoot it properly.  Before I cut it, he'd place the "too-long" stock under his arm (in hs armpit) and end up shooting high many a time.  I used Gorilla glue epoxy to reattach the cut ends and it is a solid fix at this time.

    WI'll do!  

     

    I cant wait to shoot with my grandkids.  My oldest is still trying…no pressure….

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    Fischer
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +5

    My D54 .20 is sighted in for 105 yards that had windage but I am still winding the windage at 35 yards after the wind at 105 yards across a lake.

    I still have to dial more on the windage but I have adapted to the "new" zero on the Traditions 3-10X 40mm Black Powder scope inside the 2nd Generation Diana Zero Recoil rings and mount.

    Once I align the windage to "zero" wind I will have this rifle sighted for 25 to 105 yards.

    That is how accurate these heavy .20 pellets shoot out of this customized air rifle for .20.

    The other thing is the D48 "action" is 100% suited to shoot the light .20 JSBs for the highest KE.

    I have the "heavy" .20 pellet version with unlubed tinned pellets from JSB Exact; but the heavier pellet may not be the first choice for the D54 or D48 just "because" of what YOU want to do with the customized rifle.

    I definitely like the rifle tuned to heavy .20 JSB Exact Match Diablo and whatever else could be added to make it sound even more diabolical; but the maker of my own .20 has HIS tuned to .20 JSB Exacts about 2 or 3 grains less that mine.  It was his rifle with that Traditions Black Powder 3-10X 40mm scope on top of Diana Zero Recoil Mounts and rings that MADE me spend to get one.

    Don't regret it yet.  Don't regret any HW I ever bought for reliability and function. 

    But there are way cheaper ways to invest in other things so you end up losing a fortune with nothing but plastic and molded stuff to try and resell.

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    shawnlyndy
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    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    I have the ASP 20 in synthetic stock would have preferred wood. Great shooting rifles. Worth the fix no doubt. I have fixed a couple cracked stocks that same way. Held up great.

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    Glenroiland
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    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    shawnlyndy

    I have the ASP 20 in synthetic stock would have preferred wood. Great shooting rifles. Worth the fix no doubt. I have fixed a couple cracked stocks that same way. Held up great.

    Glad to know…hopefully it holds…

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    john8
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +3

    I swear by West System Epoxy, it's used by boat builders.I use it on all my architectural wood work. They have handy repair packs for minor repairs. A little expensive but if you value your wood it's well worth every penny.

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    Glenroiland
    Participant
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    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    john8

    I swear by West System Epoxy, it's used by boat builders.I use it on all my architectural wood work. They have handy repair packs for minor repairs. A little expensive but if you value your wood it's well worth every penny.

    Thank you. I'll keep that in mind if this fix doesnt hold…

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    seangabrell
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    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    I hope I never have to do this, especially on the ASP20. But glad to see it can be done. Keep us posted on the results 

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    Glenroiland
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    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    seangabrell

    I hope I never have to do this, especially on the ASP20. But glad to see it can be done. Keep us posted on the results 

    Agreed.  I was so upset last night when I dropped it while cocking it and saw the damage…

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    Glenroiland
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    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    Well.  It looks good, is holding, and shoots perfectly. Guess I didn't upset the scope when it dropped!!

     

    Thank you for pushing me to do it!

     

    I moistened the wood to allow deeper glue penetration and seepage further into the crack.  I the tightened the clamps ETREMELY tight over the defect.  After the glue dried I used my fingernail to smooth out any irregularity and remove residual glue ( I used water resistant wood glue).  I then used a black sharpie to cover any non black edge,  and some old black shoe polish to blend and polish the defect.  Turned out great!!

     

     

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
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    Glenroiland
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +7

    I went with more traditional wood glue for a few reasons.

     

    1.  I have used it on many projects that have withstood the test of time.  This cutting board I made in 1983.  It has been dropped, stressed, abused and put in the dishwasher countless times and all of the seams have held up perfectly (I've used the wood glue in sundry other products under stress as well with perfect results)

     

    2.  I figured if I couldn't fix it, it would be easier to remove wood glue than epoxy.

    3.  I feel epoxy might be stiffer and more prone to re breaking.  I've used wood glue and if the edges match up well and its held under compression I have seen the wood break in another area rather than along the crack.

    4.  The edges mated perfectly and I feel wood glue may work better here and epoxy may be better to fill in gaps.

     

    I just didn't want to touch this project since I wanted a "perfect outcome".  You guys pushed me to do it and I'm so thankful you did.

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by  Glenroiland.
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    GoldenStateAIRGUNer
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    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +11

    Sorry to hear that you dropped your Sig Glen ! Any other damage other than the stock ? Trying to figure out how you dropped it while cocking ?

    The key to a good wood crack repair is to open up the crack as much as you can without increasing it's length. I've used Gorilla Glue on cracks that wasn't a gun stock. Wetting the wood is a great thing to do and will allow for a better bond. Fortunately, I think where it cracked might be a better place than if it were on the forearm. Just keep watching it as the ASP20 has high shake firing behavior.

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