Baiting Eurasian collard doves

Forums Hunting Baiting Eurasian collard doves

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    cmatera
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    Have some around.  Usually sit on my detached buildings asphalt shingled roof.  It's too close to the road to shoot without standing in the street, and I want to be discreet.  I have a corral with about 15 round wood fenceposts.  That's where I'd like to shoot them.  Anyone bait them to put them where you want them?

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    Bob_O
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    Would be nice to shoot them but I've never seen one as far north as I am.

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    markT
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    1:BTM ( Brown Top Millet)

    2: Japanese Millet

    3: Cracked Corn

     

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    badammo
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    Just set up a bird feeder and let them get used to coming in for the free meal. Set up a hide and stack em and whack em. The little tweety birds will be happy too.

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    seven08
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    We got them here…big time.   Skip the fancy food,  spread el cheapo bird seed where you want them to land. The little birds will find it first which will draw in the big doves.

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    NMshooter
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    Bob_O

    Would be nice to shoot them but I've never seen one as far north as I am.

    I think it's just a matter of time. They have moved into Colorado and Utah. I have read reports of sightings as far north as in Indiana for the Midwest. They are quite prolific breeders. Good news is that they are 1/3 larger than a Mourning Dove.

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    cmatera
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    Yep.  I live in CO

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    Bob_O
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    NMshooter

    Bob_O

    Would be nice to shoot them but I've never seen one as far north as I am.

    I think it's just a matter of time. They have moved into Colorado and Utah. I have read reports of sightings as far north as in Indiana for the Midwest. They are quite prolific breeders. Good news is that they are 1/3 larger than a Mourning Dove.

    Well, if they move into this area I'll be the first to notice them on the farms.  From what I can tell in videos I've watched, they aren't very smart.  I've seen so much footage of one being shot and the ones next to it don't even fly off, unlike the feral pigeons.   Should make for some good shooting when they make it up here.

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    pesty3782
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    We have them in Southern California and in some counties you can shoot them year round and no bag limit.  After seeing what you guys get to hunt we have crap here…..wait we have had always crappy hunting….

    They are very tasty on the BBQ

    Tony P

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    airgunmike56
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    LOL guys, Any feed store sells Chicken scratch feed for about 11 dollars for a 50 LB bag

    I buy about three bags a month to feed the euro doves and sparrows, I have a lot of song birds that come in for the feed also, They get a pass, Its cheap, and I built some really cheap feeders to feed the birds , I also have a few squirrels that come to the feeder and they get a pass also, I have only counted four squirrels in the past two years , I hope they start breeding soon.

    Mike   

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    Makoda
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    The collard doves taste so good too I hope we get overrun by them, but that won’t happen at my place.  😁

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    cea1960
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    They're in northern IL.  I have 12 collared doves that frequent my feeders.

    However, it's not legal to shoot them in IL.  They are protect same as mourning doves.

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    Element
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    We have them in Nebraska and they've been here for sometime, the birds around my area seem to know when it's safe and when its not, i use lots of grains and cracked corn for them and other good birds but its not easy to get those collared doves.  Those vidoes at dairy farms always amaze me at how they stick around for the next shot!

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    LDP
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    We have collard doves all over Montana. I second the choice of feed airgunmike56 uses. Chicken scratch is super cheap compared to other bird seeds.

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    Dairyboy
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    We have them everywhere here in WA. I mean I see 50+ every single day by my calves alone. 

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    SlimChance
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    Common at bird feeders here in Georgia. They are also an invasive species and have no season or bag limit.

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    davidsng
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    I can believe it, just got a collar dove in southern MN.

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    Bob_O
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    Very nice David……send some my way…….I'll need them up here by next winter!  

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    Francesmeader
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    2: Japanese

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    JohnL57
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    Bob_O

    NMshooter

    Bob_O

    Would be nice to shoot them but I've never seen one as far north as I am.

    I think it's just a matter of time. They have moved into Colorado and Utah. I have read reports of sightings as far north as in Indiana for the Midwest. They are quite prolific breeders. Good news is that they are 1/3 larger than a Mourning Dove.

    Well, if they move into this area I'll be the first to notice them on the farms.  From what I can tell in videos I've watched, they aren't very smart.  I've seen so much footage of one being shot and the ones next to it don't even fly off, unlike the feral pigeons.   Should make for some good shooting when they make it up here.

    That 'stupid' stuff may be the case at the feedlots, but in my area where they live in the woods and forage in fields they are much more wary than the native Mourning Dove. All it takes is for you to stand still within 50 yards or so and look up at the perched bird to spook them. The fact that they're often roosting over heavy cover and brush can make retrieving downed birds a challenge. They're also pretty tough-a crippled bird will drop like a stone, then revive and burrow into the brush. They are tasty though and worth the effort especially when seasons close on rabbit and quail. 

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