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Aiming Vs. benching Vs. bench holding

Forums General Discussion Aiming Vs. benching Vs. bench holding

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    Springrrrr
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +11

    Honestly not trying to take anything away from some of the fine shooting that is displayed here on this site because it is stellar.

    The guns we are using today are nothing short of phenomenal compared to what daddy had.  Even the cheapie knock offs from foreign lands.

    So some of the videos taken through the scopes clearly show that the gun is rested at both ends due to the absolute lack of movement.  At that point, if the wind is calm and the holdover is correct, the shot is determined on the ability to put the cross hairs where the shooter wants them to be and operate the trigger without moving.  The rest is mostly dependent on the gun and pellet choice.

    The next step is front resting the gun and holding it to the shoulder with no solid rest at the stock end other than what your arms are on.  That can be seen with distinct movement in the scope and then hopefully releasing the trigger when on target.  Precise accuracy may diminish slightly when done this way, but it mimics competitive shooting more closely.

    Then there is holding the gun by the fore-stock with the hand on a rest and the stock against the shoulder.  This many even add an increased factor of movement to the mix.

    If going to the Olympics is in your future, you have to use the fourth method that I don't even like to talk about.  May as well put on some good dance music on the radio to keep in tune with the shakin'.  Standing hold only.

    I like to use method # 3.  Hold the fore-stock with hand on a rest and gun against the shoulder.  It becomes a combination of aiming and trigger control when the shot should be released.  I find my spring guns like this method better and I can go either way with the PCP's.

    What method do you use and which one works best?

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    intenseaty22
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +120

    This is very timely as it’s something I have been thinking about lately a lot. I like to zero my guns using the absolute most secure method I can. That lets me know what the gun and pellets are capable of doing. It removes most of me from the equation. 

    After that I do most of my shooting the way you do. Hand on bag, gunnto shoulder. (For springers) For PCP I use the Bipod and my shoulder. 

    Any other methods I decide on using after that and fail, I will know it’s me, and not the gun. 

     

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    r1lover
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +16

    I shoot springers and it's number 3 for me, always.  I generally make a fist with my left hand and lay the fore end on top of the muscle in the V between my thumb and index finger.  That way I whether I am laying my forward hand on a flat surface, slanted surface or gripping a tree branch or vertical object, I can pretty closely duplicate the hold on the gun every time.

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    nced
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +30

    My springers (.177 Beeman R9 and .177 HW95) don't shoot very accurately when I'm bench shooting them and another issue (for me) is that poi isn't the same in the field as when shooting from the bench. LOL…..this doesn't bother me at all since I can't take a shooting bench into the woods for stalking squirrels OR to a field target match to shoot piston hunter class.

    My solution was to try refining my hunter class field target shooting method of sitting on a bucket resting the gun on cross sticks like this………

    When hunting I can easily take my bucket and sticks with me into the woods and set up "normal style" without concern for "ultimate springer accuracy" since "minute of squirrel head accuracy" is sufficient.

    15 out of 20 "bucket and sticks" CPLs through a 3/4" killzone with the .177 R9 at my back yard practice lane…………

     

    How about a few sub 3/4" ctc 5 shot 50 yard "bucket and sticks" groups shot with my .177 R9 and .177 HW95, again, back yard practice lane……….

    More recently I shot a few 18 yard "bucket and sticks" groups upstairs when testing out some 4.52mm 8.4grain Air arms domes from my HW95………

    Bottom line, with a recoiling piston gun it's simply a matter of what works best for the shooter. For me that doesn't include a bench rest!

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    outdoorman
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +26

    There's another method that I use. Standing while using a single shooting stick holding the forestock to the side of the stick. This is the way I shoot most of the time with occasional  off hand shooting. My method allows easy stalking in the woods with the lightweight (11oz) stick giving me very good accuracy with a springer. My scope is zeroed for use with the stick. Shooting off hand or from a rest requires considerable compensation.

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    BeemanR7
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +24

    A lower back problem prevents me from shooting offhand much, even with a bullpup. I almost always use some sort of rest under the forearm, whether a tree or fence or automobile. But at night hunting predators with my Condor, I shoot strictly off a bench with a bipod in front and a sloping sandbag under the pistol grip, so that, by sliding the gun fore and aft, I can precisely adjust my elevation. In this case, the gun is perfectly stationary when I fire the shot. I'm touching only the pistol grip and the trigger. Rarely miss. 

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +65

    Number 4 for most practice. Number 5(seated resting on the knee) for most matches and zeroing.

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    rugerguy211
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +0

    #2 for me when sighting.  After that I prefer to shoot off hand.

    FWIW, at one of our local clubs we shoot .22 powder burner rifles at 50 yards, and everyone uses method two for the bench rest matches.

     

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    boscoebrea
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +25

    I always shot offhand,even when sighting a scope are finding the right pellet,that was until a month ago,what happened is I got 5 different air guns plus five different scopes…yea I tried to get the right "combo"sighting in scopes ,finding right pellets…geeze frustration insued trying to do it "offhand,still I tried for 2 weeks,then the thought occurred to me,put the gun on a solid rest….yea that's the ticket, finally I got somewhere,dammm what a difference….butt I tell you this ,a rest under the forearm is all I need.So my story is thus,when sighting in or trying to find the right pellet a rest is the way to go ,another thing I will never buy so many different combos at the same time again and getting good groups twice the size of rested group is next to impossible for me,butt three time is great and either rested or offhand is fun and fun is what it is about.

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +62

    Some of you guys may find this interesting…it is exactly on point. After awhile you have to pick the gun up and shoot it with your hands…no benches, no sticks, no excuses. Once you do you have to practice…and if you do that eventually you will get good at it. I am in the process of doing this myself and making happy little discoveries along the way…like shooting with my head and neck straight up instead of cocked all the way over on the gun. This is a topic I started earlier this evening on the subject…

    https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/wildcat-offhand-fun/

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    cwh
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +1

    Ed..minute of squirrel head accuracy…love it!

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    Cherokee140
    Participant
    Member
    Accuracy: +15

    I use the bench for pellet testing, or any changes to the gun.  On powder guns when working up loads.  You are trying to find out what the gun and load/pellet will do, not what you do.  Taking human out of the mix is really the best way to do this.

     

    After that, it is really up to you, some people just love shooting bench, I get that.  I also have lower back issues and really most air rifles are a little porky….finding a PCP under 7lbs is a bit of a chore.  I usually shoot my little fusion off hand, it shoots really well, is very trim, and is just a hoot.  Guess this is why my most loved 22 rimfire is an old nylon 66.

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    Deleted Account
    Accuracy: +62

    Most FX air rifles weigh from 6.5 to 7 lbs. Check them out…

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