Advice please.

Forums General Discussion Advice please.

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    ptthere
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    I just acquired a brand-new (and also discontinued) Benjamin Summit. It is basically a NP2 gun with different furniture.

    The thing is, I can not get this thing to lock up to save my life. Haven't fired a single shot out of it. Something is off.

    This is not my first go-around with a break-barrel.

    Any ideas? This is the first time that I have been stumped out-of-the-box.

    PT

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    brian_null
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    While I do not own that particular rifle, I do own quite a few break barrels.

    Try screwing the trigger adjustment screw out a bit and see if the piston doesn't catch then.

    I've had gas piston guns not catch on the trigger assembly because of over adjusting the trigger to break as light as possible.

    Just a thought.

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    DirtyDovi
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    I ran across this possible explanation over on GTA:  

    "If the Nitro Piston rod is not centered and properly seated things may bottom out before the sear can latch.

    Also, there is a spring in the trigger assembly which can escape when the gun is disassembled.  Without this spring in place ti will not latch.

    The sear itself should be outside the little cross piece on the compression tube.

    That's about all I've got sight unseen.  Good luck finding your issue." – Roadworthy 

    https://www.gatewaytoairguns.org/GTA/index.php?topic=114502.0 

    Granted the OP had his rifle apart – It still wasn't cocking/catching/engaging the sear..  

    Just another shot at this one – Hoping it might help.  

    🙂 

    Sam –

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    stoti
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    I'd also try the trigger as Brian suggested. I've had it happen before on other break barrels too. Good, easy place to start.

    Stoti

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    Windmill01
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    PT it may be the wording but when you say you can’t get the rifle to lock up do you mean cock it or lock the barrel closed? 

    Gary

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    ptthere
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    Windmill01

    PT it may be the wording but when you say you can’t get the rifle to lock up do you mean cock it or lock the barrel closed? 

    Gary

    I should have worded myself better. When I cock the barrel, I can't feel or hear the piston or sear catch at all, and obviously letting go of the barrel at that point would be a very bad idea. Early this morning was the first time I have had a chance to be hands-on with this gun since it arrived.

    I appreciate everyone's response so far. I did take the action out of the stock to clean up some of the gunky excess brown lube that Crosman uses when they build these. I need to look at it again tonight and see what the issue is. But by all means please keep any ideas coming 🙂

    PT

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    marflow
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    a parts diagram is on this page might help

    https://www.crosman.com/benjamin-summit

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    Windmill01
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    PT thanks for clearing the wording up. I had a similar issue with my 177 Titan. I was trying to adjust the trigger as fine as safely possible and all of a sudden it wouldn’t cock. I forget which way I had to adjust the screw but it was the opposite of what I was doing. Problem fixed.

    Good luck with yours.

    Gary

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    ptthere
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    Problem fixed, it didn't take long to see it when I removed the stock again and took a closer look. Someone inserted the trigger group into the receiver wrong. I apologize in advance for my oily and dusty fingerprints. I removed the secondary safety arm for the "anti-fire when cocked" or whatever it is called before taking the pic:

    Before/as-purchased/wrong:

    As you can somewhat see above, this rifle actually has a legit trigger in it with a nice sear setup. The trigger group can be removed in whole from the rifle by removing the mounting pin for the stock, and then sliding the trigger group rear-wards in the tube before lifting it out of the tube. As you see here in the above photo, the trigger group was installed with the front of the sear/disconnector protruding INSIDE of the receiver tube.

    Here is what it looks like properly installed:

    So basically when I first tried cocking the rifle, the machined piece that the cocking lever floats in was traveling backwards and dead-heading into the front of the sear. After removing the trigger group and re-installing it correctly, that part of the action now floats correctly over the sear/disconnector and the action is operating nicely and cocking as it should. Last night when I first attempted cocking I didn't get too agrressive with it, and I did not see any damage done to any of it.

    What's interesting it that I have never seen ANY gun, whether it be a firearm or air rifle assembled with that much of a screw-up in the trigger area. Ironically, one of the many reasons why I was excited to buy this rifle is because it was assembled in the U.S.A.

    Anyway, thanks all of your responses. Now it's time to put a decent scope on this sucker and put it to use 😀

    PT

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    Windmill01
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    Glad to hear you found the problem. I’ve done the same thing, as soon as I looked at the photos I recognised it. Initially when I’ve been putting my Titans together I made the same mistake. Ever since I’ve made sure that it was above the compression tube.

    Well done 

    Gary

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    ptthere
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    Windmill01

    Glad to hear you found the problem. I’ve done the same thing, as soon as I looked at the photos I recognised it. Initially when I’ve been putting my Titans together I made the same mistake. Ever since I’ve made sure that it was above the compression tube.

    Well done 

    Gary

    The thing is though, when I unboxed it and cleaned her up yesterday, I didn't remove the trigger group. It was assembled that way in NY apparently. I simply removed the stock, wiped the brown factory mystery-lube off of everything (there was a lot of it), and applied a few different lubricants to specific areas. Although I do have a pack of springs on the way to replace the heavy lawyer spring with something lighter for the pull.

    In fairness, I was staring right at the trigger assembly yesterday because there's a few areas there that I hit with a drop of lube. I just didn't see the problem with the sear, although I wasn't looking for it either.

    I can't gripe much though. I specifically wanted this rifle for various reasons. One of them is that I wanted to concentrate on .22 over the .177 because I wanted a multi-purpose air rifle for target and pest elimination that had some extra oomph behind it. I do not care for the big fat triangle-style "SBD" mods that Crosman is putting on their latest variants of the latest Crosman/Benjamin offerings. It's just too toy-looking to my eye. This model has been labeled as discontinued, it was the very last one in Amazon's distribution network (bought it through the Benjamin/Crosman seller storefront on Amazon because it was $30 cheaper and they offered a no-interest installment that got it to my door for $40 up-front). What I like about the monte-carlo stock on this one is that I have larger hands, and the forend of this stock is wider than some of their others and it fits my hand like a glove. The comb on the stock behind the trigger also has an agrressive rake to it and gives my hand a comfortable feel when reaching to the trigger, more comfortable than I expected actually, and it feels very natural and well-oriented, which is what I was looking for.

    Hopefully my next post about it has good results in it in the Hunting section 😉

    PT

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