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Accuracy test FWB300S and HW30S

Forums Traditional Airguns Traditional Airguns – Discussion Accuracy test FWB300S and HW30S

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    Jonnes
    Participant
    Member
    Netherlands
    Accuracy: +37

    I know, comparing a fixed-barrel match rifle with a relatively cheap break-barrel rifle isn’t fair. But I was just curious about the differences in accuracy between two of my all time favourite air rifles; the HW30S and the FWB300S, and had never actually tested them side by side. First of all, I tried to be as consistent as possible comparing both rifles, so I removed the scope from my HW30S and slapped a diopter sight on it, since I shoot my FWB300S unscoped. The distance for testing was 11 yards or 10 meters. And after  some experimentation with pellets, I learned that both rifles at this distance seem to like the JSB Match Diablo .177 wadcutter’s at 8.02 grains and a head diameter of 4.52mm. For longer distances they both like the JSB Diablo Exact pellets at 8.44 grains pellets with a head diameter of 4.52mm.

    Since the FWB300S uses a recoilless system, shooting this rifle is as easy as shooting a PCP. The HW30S on the other hand does have a bit of recoil, and the trigger isn’t a match trigger, but it breaks cleanly at 450 grams. It does have some creep and take-up, and a heavier pull compared to the 50 grams on the FWB300S, but the Weihrauch Record trigger is still one of the best triggers for airguns out there. The heavier trigger makes the HW30S a tad bit harder to shoot as accurate as the FWB300S. And even though the HW30S isn’t really hold sensitive, it does prefer to be shot from a shooting bag or off-hand. So for this comparison, and to be as accurate as possible, I shot both rifles from the bag.

    I shot four 10-shot groups with each rifle, and on all the cards the results look more or less the same. The reason I used wadcutter’s, is to make sure the paper doesn’t torn and the holes are distinguishable. Here are the results.

    Now how accurate is accurate, was my question. To be honest, I’ve shot better groups with both rifles, but since I didn’t use scopes for this test and I haven’t had a good nights sleep in over two days (roughly 1 hour per night), the fatigue had to be the primary cause of that. Edge to edge the groups measure .29″ (7.6mm) with the FW300S and .55″ (14mm) with the HW30S on average. Acceptable enough, considering the recoil and heavier trigger that the HW30S has compared to the FWB.

    The build quality on the FWB is unsurpassed. Each and every part is machined and polished to perfection from the factory, and it all fits really snug together. The HW30S on the other hand is slightly rough around the edges when you look at it’s internal components. I had to polish the piston for instance when I bought the rifle, to remove some tool marks and burrs here and there. On the outside it all looks well finished. I’m a tall guy at 6’4″ with big hands, but the relative compact size of both rifles isn’t really an issue for me. It just takes some getting used to. The amount of fun these rifles have to offer, surely makes up for the fact that these rifles – the HW30S in particular – where built for smaller (average sized) people.

    The HW30S shoots at 607 feet (or 185 meters) per second, the FW300S does 541 (165 meters) per second on average. This small difference makes these rifles somewhat comparable to each other. I’ll be testing both rifles some more in the near future, and will add the results to this topic. But for now, I think this is a good starting point for those looking to buy a low powered airgun.

    For all intents and purposes, if you want to shoot the tightest groups possible on paper with a springer, the FW300S is an absolute winner and you can’t go wrong with it. Mine is 40 years old, has shot over half a million pellets, and is still able to squash a mosquito at 35 yards. And I don’t mean by throwing the rifle at it! Also, the FW300S is quite a lot chunkier compared to the HW30S, and not really the type of rifle you want to be carrying around in the woods all day long. But then again, it wasn’t build for that purpose. If you’re more of an out-door shooter and prefer carrying your rifle around in the field, the HW30S is surely the better choice and a great rifle to consider. With this kind of accuracy and no cocking effort what so ever, both rifles are extremely fun to shoot and once bought, will probably never leave your collection.

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    Goodtogo
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +23

    Nice shooting with both Jonnes. those small targets can be a bear.

     

     

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    Jonnes
    Participant
    Member
    Netherlands
    Accuracy: +37

    Thanks. I have literally thousands of those targets lying around. These are 12 meter rimfire match rifle targets. The smallest targets available. I use them also for my airguns to train at home, but on the range or at competitions I use the official 10 meter air rifle targets. To illustrate how small these are, I placed a wadcutter next to each target. Shooting 10’s on these is quite the challenge indeed. 😉 

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    Deja
    Spectator
    Spectator
    Accuracy: +22

    Fwb300 is the better rifle for sure, but I tend to enjoy the hw30s more. Just a lot more of a challenge shooting standing, with it being a bit hold sensitive.

    Strange how I tend to bench rest my pcp’s but do standing 14m (super official distance) and plinking with the springers.

     

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    Jonnes
    Participant
    Member
    Netherlands
    Accuracy: +37

    It depends, I use my FWB300S as my primary 10-meter match rifle (believe it or not), because I like to shoot vintage rifles more than I do PCP match rifles. It just gives you that extra challenge. So I use my FWB300S as the one hole paper puncher. But when I’m out shooting with my buds in the field, I either bring along my FX Independence, Diana 340 or Weihrauch HW30S, depending on what we’re shooting and at what range. And that’s also part of the story I’m trying to tell, because I see a lot of topics where people ask “what is the best low powered / short distance airgun” popping up almost weekly here.

    Long story short, depending on your shooting preferences, both are premium rifles and offer guaranteed fun.

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    MP44
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +10

    Nice shooting!

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    MJS
    Participant
    Member
    United States
    Accuracy: +2

    Great comparison.  Thanks!

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