220 single phase generator?

Forums Air Tanks, Pumps, Compressors, & Filters 220 single phase generator?

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    pewpewfever
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    Im not sure how to tell if something is single phase.  This Honda Superquiet eu7000is can do 120v or 240v, but does it satisfy the requirement for 220 single phase?

    https://m.powerequipment.honda.com/generators/models/eu7000is

    Other generators to consider?

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    Eaglebeak
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    Count the pins on the plug. Single phase has only one active, one neutral and an earth.

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    jarmstrong
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    just about everything is single phase, 3 ph is normally found in industrial and commercial applications. It needs 3 transformers on the pole at those business

    I have a Honda 6500 about 10 year old. it is single phase

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    Metalmaniac
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    Single phase 220 will have 2 hot legs 1 neutral 1 ground which is  ell shaped . Usually in a circle,This plug has a twist lock connection so it doesn’t vibrate and fall out of the generator receptical. All home generators are single phase as stated above. The exception is industrial and military applications.

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    TheIceman
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    Yes, this generator is single-phase. Only the round receptacle on the right will supply 240 volt single phase. 240 and 220 are the same for nearly all intents and purposes. Since the is Airgun Nation, I might assume you have one of those Yong Heng compressors (or something similar) that runs on 220 volts single phase. Any motor designed for 220 will happily run on 240. You will need to make, or purchase, an adapter cord that will plug into the round twist-lock receptacle, and have a female end to match your particular plug. More info and maybe a photo or two would help us sort it out.

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    jarmstrong
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    that generator is big enough to run your house during a power outage

    and for the cost of it , you can get a real good compressor with a gas engine 

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    pewpewfever
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    I’m looking at an airetex compressor.  And I’ve wanted a generator like that ever since I was stuck in an outage in Detroit last decade that lasted almost a week mid summer and killed or stranded a lot of people, including me.  So maybe it’s just an excuse to buy the generator?

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    jarmstrong
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    Yes sir, that is why I have a Honda 6500 gen in it's own (dog house) next to my elec meter. If I never need it, it will be fine with me😅

    Airetex compressor, I am jealous

    you have good taste

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    TheIceman
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    One thing to be aware of when running a large motor-type load on a generator. Just because the generator is rated for the amount of amperage the motor pulls while running, does not necessarily mean it will start that motor. All alternating current (AC) motors pull an amount of amps during startup that is six to eight times what the motor pulls once it gets up to speed. So, if your motor pulls 10 amps while running, it will require between 60 and 80 amps for a few moments when starting. Some generators even have a "surge" rating as well as a max continuous amp rating. My father's generator will only start his 20 gallon air compressor if the tank pressure is very low. Once it cycles off around 120 psi, then tries to start again at 90 psi, it just can't do it on the generator, but works fine on regular outlet power. This is because your house's power has a much higher surge capacity than a generator. There is not really any reliable way to find out if it will work but to try it.

    James

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    TheIceman
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    Eaglebeak

    Count the pins on the plug. Single phase has only one active, one neutral and an earth.

    Very true, even here in the U.S., but only when dealing with our 120 volt power. We also have 240 available in our houses, and it's usually reserved for high power consumption appliances such as ovens, water heaters, and AC units. 240 volts here is comprised of two hots (what you call actives) and a ground (earth), but is still very much single phase. I don't know if your power in Australia is like the power in Europe, but there 220 volts is indeed supplied by one active and one neutral, with the ever-present ground for safety. As long as the voltage measured across the two wires supplying power is between 208 and 240 volts, the motor doesn't care if one of those wires is a neutral or a second hot (active). The main advantage to the higher voltages is that it means lower amps are used, and lower amps means a smaller diameter (and therefore much less expensive) wire can be used to supply the device.

    Australia seems like a wonderful place, Eaglebeak. Are you relatively close to the city, or way out in the wildlands? Maybe one day I will be fortunate enough to visit your country.

    James

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    Eaglebeak
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    Hi James. Thanks for clearing the confusion I had about the US voltage standards. As I understood it, single phase had one active and three-phase had three. An electrician friend of mine who used to own a house in California, told me that 220 volt was 3-phase, over there. You are correct that over here, the domestic standard is single phase 240 volts. The only difference for ovens and air conditioners is thicker wire and 15 amp fuses instead of the 10 amp fuse on every thing else. Our three-phase light industrial standard is 410 volts. I live only 20 miles from Melbourne and it is heavily built up but my place backs on to 20 acres of native bush, so I can get up to a bit of skulduggery although age and health are starting to slow me down.

    Cheers

    Ian

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