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10M air pistol? FWB, Steyr, Walther, ...

I'm looking to purchase a 10M PCP air pistol. I don't have much experience except with an old FWB 65. I wear a medium-sized glove and I am right-handed and right eye dominant. I'm thinking this will make me pretty easy to 'fit' with a quality air pistol.

Pilk Guns dominate most discussions with Steyr air pistols which are a great option. However, Morini, Pardini, ... are also viable alternatives. I'm sort of leaning towards the FWB P8X based on weight and balance comments I have seen relative to other brands. I see some negative comments on the Walther 400/500 series but, nothing significant to stop me from buying one if I find it is a good option for me.

Who has experience with this type of air pistol? What words of wisdom do you have? While I don't see myself shooting in formal competitions, I really want to have a .177 pistol that will stack pellet at ~500FPS. That will let me shoot it around buildings and potentially in my house. I should note I have everything from a Beeman R9 .20 and a bunch of other springers to some high power .22 PCP rifles. I really want something to re-enforce my pistol shooting skills and may pick up a small bore style rifle to replicate what I shot in college (Anschutz 1813) in the future but, right now a pistol fits my lifestyle best and is less duplicative of my existing air rifles.

TIA, Sid
 
I’ve shot informal 10M pistol competition for many years starting with a Daisy 717, 777, FWB 80, Walther CP3, Steyr LP10, and finally a Steyr LP2 Compact. All accurate pistols. I bought the Steyr LP10(mechanical) thinking I would still complete. Well, I’m 81 and not gonna happen, but I can still hold my own. I sold the LP10 because I had too much money into it for the times I used it. Then I found a great deal on the LP2 Compact. It’s got a time expired tank , but I don’t care. For what you describe your intended purpose, this pistol is perfect. As any Steyr, or FWB, Walther, Morini, for that matter, it’s trigger and ergonomics are perfect.
 
Obviously, you are looking at a high end pistol. No problem if your wallet agrees. But on the much more economical end , look at the Crosman 1701P Silhouette PCP.Myself and several of my buddies have purchased them. They are super accurate. will stack pellets all day long. at 10 meters. We even shoot them out to 22 yds.putting most shots in the 9 & 10 ring shooting the B4 target with 7.0 gr pellets. 

We all added the Williams notched target rear sight and custom grips. It also has a fully adjustable Marauder trigger which I have adjusted mine down to 10 ozs. All that said and done the high end pistols you mention, are hard to beat. But the Crosman meets all the standards you are looking for. Just something to think about. $400 vs $1600 to $2,500
 
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Sidney -

You didn't get the answer that you were hoping for, where you posted it in the pistol section ? Where this question...should be posted !? We have to comment twice ?



Mike

I am hoping to get some responses from a broader group in the general forum before I drop ~$2K on a pistol. And no, I don't need the same answer twice.
 
I shot a Pardini K12 regularly for several years. It was a very nice gun. I replaced it with the Steyr LP50 which is a tremendous amount of fun being a semi auto. They say the trigger and accuracy isn't as good on the LP50 as a dedicated 10 meter pistol. But it's plenty good... Unless you are doing some serious competition then look at the LP50. If I would have known how fun the LP50 is I would have bought one years ago.
 
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    https://www.newenglandairgun.com/matchgun.html

    http://www.matchguns.com/en

    This is a newer venture by Cesare Morini (who sold Morini a while back). They are a bit less expensive being a new brand but at least as competitive and well made as any other European 10m AP. I bought the MGH-1 Mechanical and it's been perfect... comes with two cylinders which is more than enough air to exhaust you (100s of shots) and the clever pellet loading port ensures a consistent feed and delivery. Lots of grip sizes too. 

    Amongst all the brands the junior or club models are just as accurate in a normal shooter's hands, their top models experiment with shrouds and compensators, very subtle refinements that you likely won't notice until you are more experienced. Many coaches recommend the shorter pistols for new comers because while the sight radius is less, so is the movement from not being strong enough. 
     
    I have a Steyr LP5 with the heavy (2 lb) trigger that I bought to be able to practice bullseye at home. By drilling a couple holes in a weaver rail I was able to replace the rear sight and mount a red dot, although the iron sights are back on it now.

    Given the amount of use it has seen I would consider it reliable. The semi-auto system has given me no trouble at all. The regulator did fail, but was repaired by Pilkington for $150. I believe the design flaw that led to the failure has been corrected.

    With multiple grip and trigger adjustments it was easy to find the right setup, no rasps and putty needed. Accuracy more than meets my needs, although I have never mounted a scope to see what it is ultimately capable of.
     
    https://www.newenglandairgun.com/matchgun.html

    http://www.matchguns.com/en

    ,,. Many coaches recommend the shorter pistols for new comers because while the sight radius is less, so is the movement from not being strong enough.

    "Wobble area" or "Natural area of aim" is something I had to overcome with my Glock decades ago as I was used to a heavy S&W L-Frame revolver with a 6-inch barrel. That Glock was so light, I had the opposite problem since that heavy revolver dampened out the 'shakes'.
     
    Shooting indoors is fun, at least if you are alone and not irritating people who can hear it. The danger, with any lead, is the dust from impact so putty traps are best and for heavens sake don't let toddlers crawl around that area or suck on lead pellets (they taste salty).

    I'm well past child-rearing age and my nieces and nephews are all either graduating high school in a couple of weeks or are adults with their own children.

    In terms of lead exposure, I've been down that road with gun ranges and shooting smallbore during college. While a valid concern, living on a farm I'm more concerned with exposure to pesticides and herbicides personally in this old drafty farmhouse. Skin cancer from sun exposure is more likely to kill me than lead dust at this point but, your point is understood and prudent advice for anyone, myself included.

    I have a 22lr trap with sand in the tray to catch bullets off the 45-degree backstop. With a cardboard target face, most dust will be limited to the inside of the trap and the sand trap in the bottom. Lead splatter will be reduced too by running ~500 FPS so, putty, clay, or appropriate cardboard are all pretty good option to cut dust and richochets.
     
    ... look at the Crosman 1701P Silhouette PCP.Myself and several of my buddies have purchased them. They are super accurate. will stack pellets all day long. at 10 meters. We even shoot them out to 22 yds.putting most shots in the 9 & 10 ring shooting the B4 target with 7.0 gr pellets. 

    We all added the Williams notched target rear sight and custom grips. It also has a fully adjustable Marauder trigger which I have adjusted mine down to 10 ozs. All that said and done the high end pistols you mention, are hard to beat. But the Crosman meets all the standards you are looking for. Just something to think about. $400 vs $1600 to $2,500

    Just the type of insight I was hoping to find in the General Forum! I briefly thought about FTS and similar options but, my college days got the better of me thinking about accuracy and training.
     
    I've had several Fwb's, but no pcp, several Pardini's, a Morini, 2 Walther's, 3 Diana's, Izh's, and maybe others I can't think of at the moment. I've also shot many others, including the Lp50. It's a hoot but years ago I bought an Aeron B96 and I actually prefer it. Still have a Pardini K58, Pardini co2, Walther LPM, the Aeron, a Tau 7, and occasionally shoot my friend's Morini and Steyr LP 50. All are nice to shoot. I never shot serious competition but was mostly in the 540 to 560 region with a high of 572, many years ago. I shoot the best out of all those with my Pardini co2, at this point. I looked at the Matchguns while in Germany in 2018. They looked like a Morini, to me. For the cost, I'd give them a serious look.

    My K58 is from the 90s and has never been resealed and has had countless tins of pellets through it. Still shoots the same. My other Pardini is the same but a little newer. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another if I was in the market. At 69, no pistol competition is being considered , though.

    I wish you good luck with your shopping. They are WONDERFUL machines to own and shoot.

    Bob
     

    maxtrouble

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    Feb 24, 2018
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      Obviously, you are looking at a high end pistol. No problem if your wallet agrees. But on the much more economical end , look at the Crosman 1701P Silhouette PCP.Myself and several of my buddies have purchased them. They are super accurate. will stack pellets all day long. at 10 meters. We even shoot them out to 22 yds.putting most shots in the 9 & 10 ring shooting the B4 target with 7.0 gr pellets. 

      We all added the Williams notched target rear sight and custom grips. It also has a fully adjustable Marauder trigger which I have adjusted mine down to 10 ozs. All that said and done the high end pistols you mention, are hard to beat. But the Crosman meets all the standards you are looking for. Just something to think about. $400 vs $1600 to $2,500

      I also went the 1701p route. Excellent pistol that is very accurate indoors. I purchased some aftermarket grips and it is an excellent option. I use it in the winter time when it is too cold for the range or late night plinking. 50 shots on a flat 450 fps string is perfect with the Williams sights.
       
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      For more on the fun side of things I like my Steyr LP5 which is a 5 shot semiauto with a very nice 8 oz trigger but the Morini I had was a tiny bit more precise because it was a single shot and had a E trigger which could be adjusted very light, like 1-2 oz.

      At 10M we're pretty much talking when shot off the bench the same hole for 5 shots with the Morini vs a slightly larger ragged hole with the LP5. In other words just shooting offhand I couldn't tell a difference between the two but I enjoyed the LP5 more because its a semiauto, so I kept the LP5 and sold the Morini.

      Sid, you could get practically any 10M Olympic type of pistol and be happy, and unless you had them all in front of you to try out you wouldn't be able to see for yourself what feels best to you. That could be a next step depending on where you live - to find a place that sells these type of pistols and at least put them to hand or maybe shoot them. Or possibly meet up with someone that owns one or two that live in state.
       
      Sid, you could get practically any 10M Olympic type of pistol and be happy, and unless you had them all in front of you to try out you wouldn't be able to see for yourself what feels best to you. That could be a next step depending on where you live - to find a place that sells these type of pistols and at least put them to hand or maybe shoot them. Or possibly meet up with someone that owns one or two that live in state.

      I had a nice conversation on the phone about an hour ago with Neal Step of ISS! If things go as expected, I will meet him in Fort Worth in a week or two.

      As you said, any of them seem to be a great option for me and the differences are mostly insignificant to a user like myself so, I really need to see and feel them in my own hand and find the one that calls to me most.
       
      I resisted reading your post the first couple times I saw the title, knowing full-well what a black hole of opinions the thread would be(come). But after my 32 ounce morning coffee, I felt adequately prepared to open the thread.

      As expected, you've gotten plenty of personal-opinions feedback; and also as expected, a certain amount has strayed from your (at least implied) primary parameter of top-quality ten-meter pistols. That's quite alright, as there are, and have been, some very excellent 'lesser' ten-meter pistols capable of competing with the best; some in fact capable of beating the best. Not to mention their suitability for the lesser purposes you intend (FUN).

      Exhibit A-

      Tau 7 plaque.1650905913.JPG


      This .22 caliber Tau 7 Co2 pistol whipped the largest field (of 22 shooters) to ever contest the two-day Texas State Championships in NRA Air Pistol Silhouette contesting Open Sights class.

      Exhibit B-

      Kite and trophy.1650906131.JPG


      Though you've never heard of it, the .177 Benelli Kite 'Kid' PCP destroyed the Sporter Pistol field consisting of all manner of air pistols (including AZ modified Steyr ten-meter guns).

      After reading the wealth of experience in this thread, I couldn't help wonder how many ten-meter pistols I have personally owned; some models of which I've owned multiple examples or variations. The count wasn't difficult to accomplish, since I've kept relatively good records of my airgun testing; but only over the last forty some-odd years. Including the Steyrs, FWBs, Pardinis, Hammerlis, FEGs, Taus, Rohms, Brnos, Crosmans and Skanaker, they total 37 ten-meter pistols I've owned and ENJOYED IMMENSELY; many in ways sane folks can only imagine... if they dare.

      Exhibit C-

      Tau and snake.1650907216.JPG


      With only it's head above water, the excellent sights and trigger of the .22 Tau 7 made the ten-meter (offhand) brain shot entirely possible. Only after retrieving the aggressive predator did I realize I was too late to save my pet bullfrog.

      And D-

      Ham 480 doves.1650907298.JPG


      Notice the shot-placements... from offhand!

      But even with such wide and wide-ranging experience(s) with ten-meter pistols, when I started trying to figure out what I'd recommend to Sid I quickly realized it would be "none of his candidates" and "all of his candidates". More specifically, in my opinion no-one can hope to know which is their best or favorite ten-meter pistol until they've owned them all. Even then, like me, you probably still can't!

      Which brings to mind a quote that may be more fitting in this thread than most other situations- "It is not the destination that matters, it is the journey."

      May you enjoy your journey as much as I have, and never reach your destination! ;-)
       
      I have been watching this thread closely as I am also very interested in venturing into the 10m hobby. I was hoping to get an answer in order to avoid the bunny trails I could easily waste time on. I think I am in trouble...

      I do have one question though; are these noisy? Is there a model that lends itself to be easily moderated for back yard practice and plinking?
       
      I resisted reading your post the first couple times I saw the title, knowing full-well what a black hole of opinions the thread would be(come). But after my 32 ounce morning coffee, I felt adequately prepared to open the thread.

      As expected, you've gotten plenty of personal-opinions feedback; and also as expected, a certain amount has strayed from your (at least implied) primary parameter of top-quality ten-meter pistols. That's quite alright, as there are, and have been, some very excellent 'lesser' ten-meter pistols capable of competing with the best; some in fact capable of beating the best. Not to mention their suitability for the lesser purposes you intend (FUN). ...

      Huge Thanks! That post is a great one!