Reply To: Hatsan 125 Sniper

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Biohazard
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Howdy Gene! I’m going to give a little perspective from the other side of the coin, having owned a Hatsan but not a BSA. My Hatsan is the 155 (walnut stock, underlever, uses the same piston plant as the 125 Vortex models. The corresponding underlever in synthetic is the 150, and there is a “Sniper” version) in .177 and I love it. I’ve had no problems at all, but there are things you should know if you opt to go this route. First, Hatsan tests their maximum velocities with medium-weight lead pellets, so you are more likely to get the advertised velocity. This also means you need to buy heavier pellets; anything under 10 grains goes supersonic in the 155, even after about a thousand shots. Second, the gun tends to be very heavy, although that’s likely due to the walnut stock. Third, the “Weaver” rails are not standard Weaver rails, and work much better with 11 mm dovetail mounts. Finally, the included fiber optic open sights are a bit chunky for precision aiming, although fine for plinking. This may be more or less important to you (depending on whether you prefer a scoped platform), but I like having usable open sights as a backup. They aren’t great, but usable.
The triggers (In models that offer the Quattro trigger) are very good out of the box, and adjustable to taste. Mine is cranked down to almost a hair trigger, and they can be adjusted for weight and length of pull. I would opt for the Vortex gas-ram powerplant, but that’s me. It isn’t whisper quiet, but the 155 has no suppressor either. It isn’t .22 rimfire loud, but it gives a good kick and a shout.
I personally prefer the price point that Hatsan tends to stay around, and I think you get much more than you pay for. For reasons of aesthetics, I prefer wood, but that’s very subjective. If you do opt to go for wood and still want a sound suppressor, investigate the QE (“Quiet Energy”) line; essentially the same guns with suppressors attached. The wood version of the 125 is the 135; I have one in .22 on order myself.
Either options are great guns for moderately serious shooters; I think the only real difference is the price.