Reply To: New Proposed Texas Airgun Hunting Rule News

Forums Hunting New Proposed Texas Airgun Hunting Rule News Reply To: New Proposed Texas Airgun Hunting Rule News

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Bullfrog
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jland48

I know I brought this up before, but regulations on bows pertaining to poundage have been removed and the only mention of black powder requirements are that it be loaded through the muzzle. 

I just looked at the proposed amendments that include the new airgun rule and saw this about bows and crossbows:

"The proposed amendment also would eliminate language regarding the legal dimensions and characteristics of broadhead hunting points and crossbow minimum requirements. Under current rule, crossbows are required to have a minimum of 125 pounds of pull, a mechanical safety, a stock of not less than 25 inches in length, and use broadheads that are at least 7/8-inch in width upon impact, with a minimum of two cutting edges (mechanical broadheads are required to open upon impact and when open be a minimum of 7/8-inch in width). The current legal requirements for bolts also apply to broadhead hunting points used with lawful archery equipment. The department has determined that with the exception of the requirement for a mechanical safety, such requirements are archaic, difficult to enforce, and unnecessary, reasoning that because hunters are unlikely to use taking devices that are inefficient or incapable of achieving desired outcomes, there is not a need to prescribe the particulars of crossbows or broadhead points by rule. The department also reasons that simplifying the rules might remove barriers to participation."

But concerning airguns they say this:

  "As noted previously, the proposed amendment to §65.11, concerning Lawful Means, would alter current language to make air guns, with certain restrictions, lawful means for the take of alligators, big game species (deer, pronghorn, desert bighorn sheep, javelina), and upland game birds.  With respect to air guns used to take alligators, big game species, and turkey, the proposed amendment would require all air guns and arrow guns to be pre-charged pneumatics (i.e., “break-action, “pump action,” and “canister” charging systems would be unlawful) and, for air guns, fire a minimum projectile size of .30-caliber with a minimum bullet weight of 150 grains fired at a minimum muzzle velocity of 800 feet per second, or any combination of bullet weight and muzzle velocity producing a minimum muzzle energy of 215 foot-pounds. It is necessary to require that air guns and arrow guns used to take alligators, big game species, and turkey be pre-charged pneumatics because department investigations revealed that other methods of charging are insufficient to produce the minimum ballistic performance necessary to reliable kill larger animals, especially at longer distances. Similarly, an analysis of ballistic performance data indicates that the .30-caliber minimum bullet size, 150-grain minimum bullet weight fired at a minimum muzzle velocity of 800 feet per second (or any combination of bullet weight and muzzle velocity producing a minimum muzzle energy of 215 foot-pounds) are the minimum specifications necessary to achieve lethality in most circumstances, and probably in all circumstances in which the distance to the target and placement of the shot are optimal."

Whoa. In the same breath they're saying archery and crossbows hunters can be trusted to freely pick their own equipment because they can be trusted to not choose something that won't be adequate for their given circumstances, but airgun hunters cannot be trusted to make the same call. 

Only out of respect to Michael and Airgun Nation do I not say exactly what comes to mind when I read that. 

Thurmound and other Texas air gunners, have you considered that it might be better to have no rule than to have a bad rule? Airguns are going to take off in the SE now that both Alabama and Florida are allowing them with pretty permissive rules. It might be better to go a few more seasons at the status quo and let Texas get left behind for a while, then when the Commissioners get their heads from where they're at and into a more reasonable place they'll be more likely to adopt what's working in their neighboring states. I'm concerned that if this rule passes now it won't be changed later.