Reply To: What scope are you using for competition BR?

Forums FT, Benchrest & Target Shooting What scope are you using for competition BR? Reply To: What scope are you using for competition BR?

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sharroff
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Nikko Sterling Diamond Sportsman 10-50×60 on my bench rest and field target rigs.  It’s crystal clear, bright, and easy to see the pellets holes from 10-55 yards.  It also has very repeatable turrets (I was trained as a turret dialer, not a hold over/hold beside guy)  The 1/8 MOA clicks on this scope let you dial to put the pellet exactly into the center of the cross hairs.  I’ll show you…..

The below is my turret tape from one of my guns (you see it in my avatar every post).  See how from 18 yards up to 36 yards all the numbers are right beside each other?  Those are 1 click apart on the 1/8 MOA elevation turret.  

A 1/4 MOA would be fine for say going from 14 to 15 yards or 42 to 43 or 47 to 48 or 49 to 50.  But from 16 to 17 you’d be off by a little bit.  Same for 17 to 18.   And if you had a 1/4 MOA turret, everything from 18 to 36 would be a little high or a little low on a 1/4 turret.

For BR and FT, this get you as close to the center as possible with as little manual compensation as possible.  For hunting, this makes hitting your target almost boringly easy with something like Strelock and a wind/weather meter.

For example, the green numbers are the actual clicks.  So I’m zero’d at the max of the trajectory (all my air and powder rifles are setup like this).  On this gun, the max is the point at “0” at around 28 yards.  Everything else is dialing back down the scope from the zero.  So on Strlock Pro, when it says something like ’80 clicks for 110 yards” I do one full rotation of the elevation turret (to 0) then 5 more clicks to the green 80 and the pellet is dead on at 110 yards in the center of the cross hairs. 

For 9 yards, dial back past 10 to 9 (purple) then about a half rotation to 8, 7, and 6 yards.  I stopped at 6 as that is the exact distance from the dining room window to the bottom of the bird feeder where I train squirrels with bad eating habits.