steve123

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    steve123
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    Pretty sure I will but how much the future will tell?!

    I was just using a Ares BTR 4.5-27×50 on my Impact an hour ago. We were shooting groups at 25Yish and the scope would just barely focus in at 27x but I hardly ever shoot that close with it. My zero is 30Y and farther out it was great. We also shot at a triangle at 161Y but my Impact 25 cal is petering out with 33's by then. No problem seeing hits on the steel though.

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    steve123
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    Very well made rifles!

    I shot Tom's 30 cal last week and it was as nice of an airgun as it gets and nothing about it I didn't like.

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    steve123
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    Cizur

    I started off using my .25 FX Wildcat, but wanted to participate in the bonus stages, so stopped taking my FX and started taking my 22 LR.

    Our bonus stages reach out to 500 yards.  No way for my FX to reach out to that distance.

    It was fun using the FX at first, but I've found I enjoy the 22LR a good deal more.

    That's my problem. Our match goes to 208Y and the NRL22 specific stages are only half of the match. The MD won't allow 2 rifles to be used and I'd finish towards the middle of the pack if I just used my AG vs winning the match or close to it using the 22rf. I've proven to myself that I am competitive with a 22rf inside 50Y using my AG and shot a perfect score on the 25Y KYL but that's only one stage. Positional inside 50Y the AG is very competitive, no difference really if the wind is down. The rest of the match would be a train wreck with a AG compared to a 22rf.

    Well, and I'm the only guy there with a PCP. 

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    steve123
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    I suggest researching wind drift because pellets blow like crazy in the wind compared to a 22rf, but way more than a 17hmr, so it would be easy to miss the head of a yote at 75Y. For example a 7mph wind coming in from the side is around 3.5" of drift at 75Y. 

    Personally I'd limit shots to 50Y and in.

     

     

     

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    steve123
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    I learned some things in this thread! Your Jacks are different than our southern brothers, the Lepus Californicaternus Jacks 😉

    Thanks

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    steve123
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    cea1960

    I've seen Jacka'lopes and they aren't that huge.  Could be a Jacka'elk that already shed its antlers. 😉

    Ha, I almost mentioned the Jackalope!

    BIL has one mounted in his living room, lol.

    • This reply was modified 1 day ago by steve123.
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    steve123
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    Smok3y

    I will chime in because I also use FFP and SFP. I do like the thicker reticles of FFP at the highest mag. I can see the reticle better it makes me more confident. 

    One example is the Athlon Cronus. I like the pre-BTR reticle better because it is thicker. I usually shoot more precision shooting (tiny targets) and don’t find any issues with the reticle being too large. I can only think of one target where I have an issue with it being an issue and that is because you are literally shooting at dots and they get very small!

    The last comment had a lot of the general ideas of why you could choose one over the other and they are good, but I would say that it is definitely ok to choose FFP even if you rarely change the mag and only shoot known distances. I do think choosing the reticle is one of the most important things you should do, especially including reticle design (looks). 

    Another thing to keep in mind is how high of a magnification you want and what you are willing to spend. I prefer FFP, but if I want a 50x scope, I am happy spending 20-25% of the price of an FFP on an SFP scope, versus paying what it would cost for the FFP model with that much mag. 

    I helped design that reticle on the Cronus – all .2's, I had one of the prototypes for about 4 months. Sure wish Athlon had not listened to the other guy concerning the reticle in the Cronus BTR, which I sold because I didn't prefer it. The thing I really liked about them was the true daylight bright illum which helped a lot on black painted steel. 

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    steve123
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    Sure doesn't look like our Jackrabbits here in Arizona!

    Is it a Snowshoe Hare?

    Well congrats!

     

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    steve123
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    Yep, if 25Y minimum focus will work for you then ZCO is at the top for airgun use. Almost Tangent Theta, which is supposed to have a tad better glass, but the minimum focus I think, is 75Y.

    A lot of people like the NF 7-35.

    And there's still S&B.

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    steve123
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    50 years later and the 600 is still one of the most reliable semiauto pellet pistols around! I don't shoot mine but 2-3 times a year and it has always worked great.

    Sad, one has to spend $$$$ to get a decent semiauto pellet gun.

    All these unreliable, finicky and constantly breaking, semiauto pellet guns that Co's put out these days is just maddening and absolutely pathetic!

    • This reply was modified 3 days ago by steve123.
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    steve123
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    What some fail to realise with a reticle in a FFP scope, is that however thin, just right, or thick, the "whichever"  – hashes, dots, etc, that are part of the reticle seem, they are always the same size on any magnification. They may """appear""" thin, just right, or thick depending on magnification but they always subtend the same exact amount. So when you say a FFP reticle is too thick on high magnification keep in mind that, for example, a 1/8"/100Y reticle may appear thick, but I bet you can't shoot sub 1/8 moa groups consistently with any rifle you own??!! But that so called thick reticle sure is easier to see isn't it! But I know how you feel anyhow, I'm just making a point. 

    In FFP a center dot that is .05 mil is always .05 mil on any magnification. This goes for line thickness, etc. BTW this is a good all around FFP reticle thickness, just sayin.

    Application for the scope is key! Would I use my Burris 1-8×24 FFP scope for benchrest, no I wouldn't. Would I use a SFP 50x benchrest scope for general hunting, or tactical oriented comps, no I wouldn't, this kind of scope would accel in F-class, BR, and such. Would I use, say a, FFP 5-25×56/H59 reticle for EBR or less accuracy oriented BR events, yes it will work fine, it will also work fine for tactical oriented comps, as well as for many types of hunting, and it's actually fantastic for colony varmints. Would I use it for close in hunting on 5x, no I'd pick a low powered variable preferably SFP but FFP with the appropriate reticle is fine, makes no difference.

    It's when we shoehorn a scope into a do all optic is when we start to run into problems. 

    You guys that are hunting tree squirrels, etc, on low to medium magnification, and don't expect more than 50-ish yard shots, don't really need a FFP scope. SFP suits this application better.

    For dynamic shooting, on medium to high mag a FFP scope, with the intent for using mostly holds, are dandy, this where they shine.

    Did you know that pellet guns are incredibly cheap to sight in – rhetorical 😁. Doesn't hurt much to switch scopes around if you have a "certain application" in mind, right??!! 

     

      

     

     

     

     

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    steve123
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    I only read a small portion of this thread so…

    Anyhow, what I've found with springers is when I change my hold in any way, it changes the POI at least some and to varying degrees.

    How hard my cheek weld is, from medium to very little, and how hard I'm pushing it from the side. Same with how I grip the rifle. Same with where I hold the rifle with my support hand or how hard I hold the rifle. And what I'm meaning is aiming at very difficult targets not pop cans at 10-15 yards away! The secret if you can call it that is to try to "do" "everything" the same every time. I personally don't use the artillery per say but just hold the rifle softly and try to follow through. 

    I've won a few FT comps in springer class using a bone stock TX200 and truthfully I didn't find shooting it in FT fun because of how hold sensitive it was. Over the years I sold most of my springers because they aren't very appealing to me anymore. The only one I regret selling is a FWB 300S which seemed less hold sensitive than any springer I've shot so far.

    Also it seems the more powerful and violent the rifle is the more problems I've had in not just accuracy but also things coming loose on the rifle. Though not technically a springer the Beeman Crow Magnum I had in .20 cal was a very hard rifle to shoot well. 

     

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    steve123
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    kpaoletti

    I have two Sorties.  Even imported one from Spain because I wanted the wood stock version.  The other one was a refurbished one from Hatsan.  They would dry fire semi auto but the bolts would not retract enough to allow the magazine to rotate.  Two trips to HatsanUSA did not solve the feed problem although they said it did.  I like to take things apart and analyze them so I started on the 0.25 one.  I found that there are two springs one can adjust.  The hammer spring (clockwise reduces tension) and the reloading spring at the muzzle. The tension on both of these springs effect how far the bolt will retract. I have gotten the 0.25 to operate fairly well by adjusting these springs but it works only at 100 – 120 bar which gives a lower velocity.  I am still in the middle of working with them and am enjoying the challenge. 

    Man I wish I was a handy guy and enjoyed these sort of challenges!

    What ends up happening to me most often is I either lose $ and have a broken gun in a cardboard box that sits there for years, or I pay a GS to try to fix the problems. 

    It's funny when I think about it because I have more than a few 22rf semiauto's and all I have to do is load them in the truck and drive for 10 minutes to shoot them???!!! But I have this nagging desire for a nice/reliable, and reasonably accurate, 12ish ftlb semiauto PCP. 

     

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    steve123
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    You'll shoot, plink, practice, etc, more often using 22 pellets. 

    Slugs are an option with all calibers.

    If you mostly want to hunt I'd go straight to 30 cal. I have a 25 and a 30, the 30 has more thwack but I hardly shoot it. If I want to hunt that's what I grab out of the safe.

    • This reply was modified 5 days ago by steve123.
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    steve123
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    bubblerboy64

    Yes,  I’ve looked at all of my FX liners using a bore scope and they are not all that impressive are they .  Of course when you compare them in cost to let’s say a match grade barrel there is no comparison in cost either.   

    The old “barrels and bullets” business may apply. 

    Im of the opinion that for best accuracy air guns will have to go to a more power burner approach.  A stiff threaded on barrel which is finely machined.  

    These interchangeable liner have advantages but consisted repeatable accuracy without POI change is not one of them.  

    I think we are seeing great strides in the development of slugs.   Now we have to get the guns up to the same standard.  I just don’t think barrels held in with set screws and O rings are going to give you the ultimate in  accuracy. 

    Anyone else thinking the same? 

    Darn right I do, it's time for more PCP's to be made to higher end firearms standards!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Let's get away from the frailty thing that's so prevalent with PCP's.  

    Heck a low end $300 Savage 22rf is more trustworthy than a $2000 FX Impact.

    I don't mind another 1.5 lbs of extra weight to have a thicker and more rigid barrel, and to have the option of having a top tier Bartlein or other competing brand barrel made for a PCP rifle. 

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    steve123
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    Nice!

    Have you determined the BC yet? 

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    steve123
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    All I can think of is L,Leon somehow found an old?? reticle chart that was found incorrect at some point, then later corrected by Athlon, because if you go to the Athlon website right now both the reticle charts for Helos and Argos APMR mil reticles are correct with the A3 and A4 dots.

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    steve123
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    L,leon,

    Ha, that reticle spec chart is wrong. Look closely. See the "small dots" are labeled A3/.1mil and the "big dots" are labeled A4/.05 mil. The truth, or the correct labeling, is reversed because .1 mil is twice the thickness of .05 mil, right?!  I can see now why there was confusion!!!!!!!!!!!

    A1 labeling however is correct = .02 mil is very very thin  – more than twice as thin as .05 mil. 

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    steve123
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    Other than the huge numbers in the reticle I love the FX 5-40. My wifes FX 5-40 is in mil and my daughter is borrowing/using it on her Brocock Sniper this winter as she travels the southern portion of the US shooting at various FT clubs.

    She shot some perfect scores with it in 2019 which was very impressive for her first year in FT and that March FX helped for sure!

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    steve123
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    Just thought I'd mention I have a Steyr LGB1 biathlon trainer(love that thing BTW) but that's where it ends for me. I'm actually trying to get back in shape these days but at almost 60 years old….

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