steve-l

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    steve-l
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    Here is a warning to those using these long fill probe connectors. It appears the slide action of the sleeve is quite rough on many of these. Add that to a slightly large diameter o rings they come with and when used, the sleeve may not allow the full seating of the locking balls in the locking groove. this result will cause the probe and whip to explosively release while filling. This can result in serious injury, unnecessary pain and a destroyed o ring. This condition is quite hard to detect, so great care is in order. I am not certain who the manufacturer is, but the ones I have seen are all the same regardless of who sold them. I got mine from DonnyFL.

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    steve-l
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    Perhaps you can play with the software by changing the BC until the computer output matches your observations. That would be a pretty good approximation at least.

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    steve-l
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    I went looking for these FX Hybrid slugs in Europe. They appear not available yet. I would like to try them in my Crown .25. Does anyone know who is selling them?

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    steve-l
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    I suffer the same symptoms with my Crown. It is virtually impossible to tell just what is moving around, but something is for sure. I like the suggestion, so I'm going to use it, but I am also going to use a bottle to shroud clamp as well. The barrel to receiver is good, but it is frail and the slightest bump on the barrel could throw off the POI.

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    steve-l
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    Here is a short story. The Bauer compressor I have now I found 25 years ago in a junkyard all dirty and rusty laying in the mud. No controls, no motor, just a bare pump. It was made in 1968. It is rated at 80 liters/minute. I took it home and stuck it in the corner. This is long before PCP airguns. It cost me a little over $100 at the time. I did nothing with it until 3 years ago. I then cleaned it up, made a mount, bought sensors and control switches and relays and added fresh paint. I then checked the original oil and turned it on. It just worked. I didn't need to take it apart or anything. it is superb and parts for it are still available from Bauer.

    Two years ago, I got a call from the President of a local dive club. Their club compressor seized up. The dealer said it wasn't repairable. The club bought a new on and the President asked me if I wanted it just for the cost of removing it. It was complete with all the filters, sound box and controls. I took it home and pulled the head and cylinder of the 4th stage. It had overheated and seized after running continuously for more than 3 days because of a switch failure. I put the piston in a lathe and polished the skirt. Then lightly honed the cylinder wall. I then reassembled and tested it. It worked perfectly. I put it in an auction and sold it for 1500 Euros. My point with this story is they are out there, you don't have to buy them new.

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    steve-l
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    bandg

    Jshepherd70

    steve-l

    There is no substitute for a Bauer. They just run for years and years without any issues. If you are serious about this sport, make the investment to acquire one and never look back. You can find them used if you look long enough. They never lose their value because they don't break and the parts to repair them are readily available.

    I can certainly agree but finding a quality middle ground is also possible I believe.  The $2k is borderline insane yet alone another $1500 on top of that. 

    Agree.  Bauer's are probably great but they may not be what everyone can afford or would consider sensible.  

    The point of my comment I thought was very clear, if not I apologize. I was not commenting on just the quality of the Bauer compressors, I was speaking also about the economics. These lesser ,inexpensive compressors have over a very short time, no resale value. So all money spent on that solution is gone. I even suggest wasted. In comparison, you buy a Bauer, use it for many years and resell it for the same or even more money than you paid for it in the first place. Nothing is cheaper than that. So. in that light, there is no middle ground. A cheap compressor at best is a temporary band-aid, while you save your money and keep your eyes open looking for a Bauer.

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    steve-l
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    There is no substitute for a Bauer. They just run for years and years without any issues. If you are serious about this sport, make the investment to acquire one and never look back. You can find them used if you look long enough. They never lose their value because they don't break and the parts to repair them are readily available.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by steve-l.
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    steve-l
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    I understand that some folks can't shoot a pistol. They take thousands of rounds of practice to master. What I don't understand is why these same folks buy a pistol then modify it into a rifle. The end result is no where as good as a rifle.

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    steve-l
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    Water is inevitable and filters help, but the best insurance is an intermediate bottle held vertically. You then charge the gun from the vertical bottle. Guys that charge directly from the compressor will always have this issue. It's called physics. The vertical bottle will act as a water condensation sump.

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    steve-l
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    bucketboy

    I make my own silencers, but the one thing I have learned is, don’t trust carbon tube on high powered airguns! I don’t care who makes them or what the wall thickness is, carbon is brittle, the slightest knock or slight imperfections in manufacture can (and has) catastrophic failure. I had one blow up on a 60fpe .25. It didn’t explode on the first shot, or the second, it exploded after about a year and thousands of shots. 
     

    Imo carbon is good up to about 40fpe, beyond that is a gamble. I now make my high power mods from thin wall aluminium pressure tube or thin aluminium tube inside a carbon sleeve.

    Edit!

    Also, it the crown barrel liner assembly is anything like my impact then you will need to be aware of clipping. The reason being, the liner tension nut may not always align correctly with the bore of the liner, when the mod is screwed on, it could be on the wonk with the liner.  On my .177 (4.5mm) impact, the hole in the endcap was 7.5mm because of alignment issues. 

    Bb

     

    Bb,

    I also build my own moderators. I never use sound absorbing materials inside. They don't last and they do nothing for sound. I use inverted cone baffles. With my design, the component alignment is provided by the outside tube itself. Component placement is accomplished by tubular spacers installed on 3 equally spaced small diameter compression rods threaded into the rear end bell. Belleville washers are used on the rods to apply baffle compression force and 3 SS Crown nuts are used to Clamp the whole assembly together. I have always made these with 6061-T6 aluminum, but I was going to make my next one from CF to save weight.  Your experience with CF gives me pause though. My current design is a product of evolution over many years. It really works well and is very quiet. I had the same concerns about barrel to moderator alignment, so I ordered .250" precision shafting and ground the shaft to the barrel end diameter, which is necessary to compensate for the Crown's barrel choke. I then use the shaft to extent the barrel line through the moderator to make certain of correct alignment every time I remove the shroud and barrel for service. This assures perfect alignment every time. 

    In my experience, the sound emitted with a moderator will contain a "Thump" element. This is caused by the moderator tube itself when it gets pressurized. This thump sound can be reduced by wrapping a rag on the moderator loosely and by increasing the rod compression force used on my 3 compression rods. I think the pellet itself is noisy. The "crack" sound element actually comes from the pellet itself and no moderator can stop that. It isn't that loud anyway, but with my moderators it is totally absent if the gun is fired without a pellet.

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    steve-l
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    Crown in .25 and .177.

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    steve-l
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    No. There are many different materials and constructions in use. There are different hardnesses, usually stated in "Shore A" as well as materials for chemical and temperature resistance. They also come in different profiles. As to what your hardware store carries, ask them. That means of course that you need to know what you want.

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    steve-l
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    Look, I don't want to rain on your parade, but you actually think you can play with your available budget, , , , you cannot. You cannot be competitive with an unregulated gun. I went through all of your experiences and questions as well. I had the same preconceptions. My initial choice was the Kral products. You might get lucky and find a gun that shoots good right out of the box, but you probably won't and if you need factory support, you will truly be SOL. It is non-existent. You will not save any money by buying an unregulated gun, then adding a regulator and spend all kinds of money in mods and excessive tuning to be competitive. You would still have a $500 gun that is bastardized. Regardless of the gun, you still have to invest in your high pressure air infrastructure and here there is no free lunch either

    So, here is my advise. Save your money and buy quality like FX or Red Wolf. They shoot well right out of the box. You will not regret it. Then avoid the Chinese cheap compressors. They are crap. This hobby is EXPENSIVE to get setup, then it gets inexpensive after that. I do not expect you to believe me. It is not what you want to hear, but it is true. Perhaps, like most folks, you will learn this the hard way.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by steve-l.
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    steve-l
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    It isn't the shroud. It is the weak mount of the barrel to frame that allows the barrel to move around. Every time I take the gun out of the case to shoot, I have to re-zero the rifle.

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    steve-l
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    Here is a follow up to my last reply. I went to order one from Ohio Air guns and although their web site allows addresses outside the US, the site sent the message that it was unable to calculate the shipping cost. I sent my first message through the site contact form and received no answer. I sent a second message yesterday and received the reply "Sorry I don’t sell out of USA " So, I used a friend's address and made the purchase. Now I wait. I do not expect this to fit exactly, but I hope it can be massaged.

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    steve-l
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    I have a Crown. It is a super air rifle, but it does have a flaw. The barrel and shroud is supported poorly at the breech end only and it does move around a little bit every time I take it out of the case, I have to re-zero the gun again. This band does make sense. The problem is that the bottles are all a different size, so every rifle will be different. That's the first thing. The second thing is the space between the OD of the bottle and the OD of the shroud. is quite small. On my crown it is about .060" and that space varies depending on where you measure the gap. So buying one as a production part does not make sense. I think this concept will work, but I also think they must be custom made for the intended rifle and 2 clamping screws will be required. One for the barrel and one for the shroud. I will make one. I'm just not sure how or of what material yet. I don't think the tolerance in internal diameter is critical of the two holes, but the spacing between the two holes should be within .001" to .002".

    Just a note: It appears barrel bands are available from Ohio air guns. contact below:

    phone:       419-983-2057

    email:        [email protected]

    location:    7878 E Co Rd 6 Bloomville OH 44818

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by steve-l.
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    steve-l
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    The number one problem all these inexpensive compressors have is excessive heat. Cooling cost money. If you compare any of these inexpensive compressors to say a Bauer, or any professional class pump, it is those differences that cost the money. My Bauer has 4 stages and between each stage there is a coil of forced air cooled SS tubing and a drain-able moisture trap. You will note that these cheap pumps use water to cool because it is less expensive and more efficient that air cooling. I'm not knocking the OP's mod at all. It works. I like the idea of enhancing the water cooled theme with a welding torch cooler and a water cooled heat exchanger between stages as well.. However, there comes a point where the enhancing mods cost more than buying a pro unit up front……..jus saying.

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    steve-l
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    Lead is quite valuable. The current price of 1 ton is $2060. Pellets are pretty much pure.Lots of uses for scrap lead and it's dense and takes very little space to store If I remember correctly, it is about 11.4 tons per cubic meter.

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    steve-l
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    srtmat,

    First what you are measuring is not run out. It is a simple bend. The correct definition of run-out is the amount that is out of round. To do that, you must measure concentricity and you are not doing that. Furthermore, bends are NORMAL. Just shipping the barrels or liners can and usually do cause some bend. Bend is really not an issue, just shoot it. If you are really care, you can straighten them. It is easy to do, but small bends do not effect accuracy at all.

    Let me give you an example, I recently bought a .177 barrel kit for my Crown through the mail. When it arrived the barrel was sticking out through the box. It was of course bent a bit, so I used an indicator and a pair of roller blocks and straightened it. It tool all of 30 minutes…….what problem. I toured the H&K factory in Germany back in 2010. A large percentage of their new barrels after returning from heat treatment are bent and are routinely straightened as a manufacturing process. Here is another heads-up, they do it optically, as with a painted "X" on the wall and their eyeball. They don't use a dial indicator. It isn't necessary. Mind you, the barrel straighteners are the highest paid workers on the factory floor.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by steve-l.
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    steve-l
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    I read this thread and many others like and I am amazed how people piss away their hard earned money. These new technologies offer solutions to non-existent problems. Like new Chronograph designs. I am a real nay-sayer here. The best, most reliable, consistent and inexpensive design is the artificially illuminated (infra-red) sun screen pair and a binary counter, simple. Some have extra features like displays in different units, sequence counters and shot string averages for more money of course, but these features are unnecessary. I still have a pencil and a calculator. I recently bought a $67 special from Ali express and it just works and at that price, I can have several and calculate my own BCs. These work indoors, outdoors and in all weather. All you need is a 9 V battery. Furthermore, you don't have to hang anything on the end of the barrel as it will change the POI. To the thread responder that trashed several of these,  if he can't shoot through the sun-screen pair without hitting the Chronograph, perhaps he shouldn't own a gun.

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