spinj

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    spinj
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    Hey folks!  Just wanted to add my experience with both brands if it will help in making the OP come to a decision.  I have neither of the scopes the OP is interested in, but I have two Hawke 4-16X50 Sidewinders and a Vortex Diamondback Tactical 6-24X50 FFP.  Both are great scopes for the price they are sold.  Personally, it is not my intention to shoot my airguns even up to 200 yards, so I felt there was no reason for me to pay over twelve hundred dollars for a scope with mid- to top-tier glass (even with having the available funds), which I believe is designed mainly to keep tracking performance accurate and resolution as crisp as possible at non-airgun distances.  This is why I cannot believe why some people will spend such amount of money on a scope intended primarily for powder-burners that can really reach out there for their airguns.  But hey, it's their money and desires, so all is good. 

    HAWKE SIDEWINDER 4-16X50 (PERFORMANCE)

    Besides the Vortex, there is no other scope I can think of in the same class–because I haven't tried any else–that can beat it.  Tracking is precise for the distances I shoot and image clarity is very good.  Of course, at maximum magnification the brightness drops and the resolution becomes a bit fuzzy, and that's because the glass imperfections are only being amplified.  However, I shoot at 10X, and this is enough for me.  Plus, it keeps the image quality bright and clear, enough to allow me to discern between the target and surroundings and everything else in between.  Turret repeatability and return-to-zero are excellent.           

    VORTEX DIAMONDBACK TACTICAL 6-24X50 FFP (PERFORMANCE)

    This is the only front focal plane (FFP) scope I own.  I think an FFP scope has its advantages, but not any more than a secondary focal plane one.  I think each type has its own specific purpose.  The glass on this scope seems to be marginally better than that on the Hawke in that image clarity is a level above and resolution is slightly crisper.  But like the Hawke, at maximum magnification, the image degrades just slightly but still brighter than the Hawke.  That said, this does not necessarily mean that the Hawke is inferior.  To me what matters is if you can see it you can hit it, and that's what you get with both the Hawke and Vortex, just cutting to the short and sweet of it.  The biggest disadvantage of the Vortex, or its FFP design, specifically, is that the reticle is almost invisible at the lower end of the magnification range.  If shooting at dark targets it is almost impossible to see the reticle.  Of course, the solution is to increase magnification, but doing so will accordingly magnify, and coincidentally exaggerate, the tiny movements your body produces. 

    FUNCTIONALITY (BOTH)

    The Sidewinder and the Diamondback (it's funny how both are named after snakes) do what they are built for.  But to be fair, what I like about the Sidewinder is that it has a turret-locking feature while the Diamondback doesn't.  It also has an illuminated reticle, which in my opinion, can come in very handy when shooting at black or dark targets.  I wish the Diamondback also has this feature because I often like to shoot at low magnification powers, and since the Diamondback is an FFP, illuminating the reticle would help in this regard given it's almost invisibile at those mag levels (or it's just my aging eyes).  The Sidewinder also comes with a large sidewheel rotor to make focusing easier.  The Diamondback does not come with one; I don't think there even is one available for it.  Both scopes provide an adjustable ocular lens to allow you to focus the reticle to your vision; however, the Hawke goes one step further by enabling you to lock its position once you've found the correct setting.  Finally, both scopes have a minimum focus distance of 10 yards, which is suitable for airguns.  

    PERSONAL RECOMMENDATION

    As is evident from the above, I would say that you can't go wrong with either.  Both brands have their own solid reputation.  And although Vortex's warranty is superior to Hawke's, I'd say it shouldn't even be a deal-breaker.  Hawke's warranty is quite respectable.  Lastly, I think both companies manufacture solid scopes that can perform much more than your abilities as a (airgun) shooter.  

    Good luck in your decision.  Cheers!

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by spinj.
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    I’ve been to Penchetta once only after having found about it when I was looking at the dealer site page from a particular scope manufacturer.  Before then I thought that AOA was the only high-end AG (and certain scopes) dealer here in the valley.  Anyway, the store is very nice with LOTS of pens, mainly of the fountain style, and some other specialty items.  The airgun selection, though not as varied as some and modest, consists of models from the upper-tier brands as stated in the OP’s post.   I think it’s a nice novelty store.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by spinj.
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    I also kill cards like these for talking smack:

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    Dbez1

    Accuracy wise, we shoot at flys and hornets at distances I’m not going to tell you because you won’t believe me.

    Oh I believe you.👍  For practice, with my powered-down (9 FPE) Cricket, I shoot the tips of palm leaves at 40 yards.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    I am interested in both but I a have an “aww man” feeling for each when deciding on either one as a second bullpup:  For the Vulcan, I feel that way because of its plastic trigger, cheekpiece, and side plate material (I think the plates are plastic as well, last time I held one). And I feel the same for the Veteran’s cocking lever location, and, yes, its stock.  Though perhaps AGT uses a high-quality polymer, for the price the Vulcan sells, it’s not acceptable to me.   I have no doubt both are precision tools, though.  Anyway, my interest has now been directed to the newly released Kalibrgun Capybara. 

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    You're welcome, folks. 

    Now, if you happen to use Chairgun Pro like me and want to dial things in for precision shooting, here's a cut-and-paste of my response to one post in the past (original post link: https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/strelok-pro-vs-chairgun/#post-362548):

     

    I've never used Strelok Pro, just Chairgun; and I find it spot-on, provided that accurate data is inputted (and I'm a turret clicker).  Aside from the usual information like ballistic coefficient, zero distance, pellet weight, projectile type, muzzle velocity and zero-distance velocity, the most important is scope height.  I cannot speak for Strelok Pro, but Chairgun requires a certain way to measure scope height, which is perhaps different to that which Strelok permits.  This link takes you to the method to correctly obtain the true scope height between your scope and rifle's barrel: https://airgunaccuracy.wordpress.com/chairgun-and-scope-height/.

     

    Once the correct scope height value is obtained, another crucial measurement is needed to be entered, and that is the correct magnification setting on your scope so that the mildot spacing is true (if you are the type of shooter who will be using holdover and holdunder).  Don't be content on the magnification level your scope's manual states as being the true mildot setting as in almost all cases it isn't.  Note that even a couple of millimeters off from the true setting is enough to yield a big difference in POI from what Chairgun states relative to the actual POI of your pellet, even at a distance of just 25 yards.  To get the true mildot setting of your scope if you use an adjustable one, follow the directions that this link provides: https://www.anstonftc.co.uk/targets/.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    Make sure that the length of the line on the bottom of the target matches what is stated in order to get the exact Mil dimensions.

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    You should be able to.

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    Here is how to find out where the true Mil setting is on your scope. Be warned, even if it is stated on the scope manual of the reticle’s true Mil or MOA setting (for multi-mag scopes), sometimes the true setting is some millimeters off—even a millimeter from the number on the scope is  enough to cause significant POI variances at great distances.

    https://www.anstonftc.co.uk/targets/

     

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    Very nice!  I've been waiting for this rifle to be released.  I thought Kalibrgun had given up on its release and so I looked hard at the Vulcan 2 instead.  However, what I don't like about the Vulcan is its plastic trigger and cheek piece.  I believe the side plates are plastic as well.  For the price that it commands, plastic parts do not do it for me.  Sorry.  I emailed AGT about whether they plan to make them out of some alloy (if not steel) in near future twice, but they have not responded. (Answer your emails, AGT!)  So, I have given up on them. 

    I eagerly await for more information being posted of the Capybara.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    I use the Diana Bullseye ZR-Mount on my springer (click on the link below).  Say goodbye to busted scopes.

    https://www.pyramydair.com/s/a/Bullseye_ZR_1_Pc_Mount_Fits_1_and_30mm_tubes_11mm_Dovetail_0_04_Droop_Compensation_Recoil_Compensation/5495 

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    Motorhead

    Disagree … if you have a leaded up STEEL air gun barrel it needs a good bronze brushing ! 

    Felt mops, nylon brushes simply won't cut it.

     

    IMO … It is a falsehood repeated over and over where folks simply state what they have read by those stating what they have read to the point it is taken as a fact that a bronze brush will damage a steel air gun barrel.

    What has potential to damage the barrel is the rod itself brush is attached too.  Crown saving sleeves or coated rods are a must.

     

     Now that said … in an air gun, seldom would you need to bronze brush the bore because at sub 1000 fps velocity leading is not a chronic problem.

    Tight chokes and shooting harder lead projectiles sadly increase lead fouling.

     

    JMO,

    Scott

     

     

     

     

    Well said.  I have been saying this for so long.  Don't be afraid of using a brass brush, folks.  All patches are going to do is smear the lead on the bore's lands and grooves.  Using a bronze brush makes removing lead easy and done in a few strokes.

    I tell you what–take a lead swarf and smear it on a metal surface with a hard object, like a spoon.  I bet you'll be thinking twice now after doing this.😉

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by spinj.
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    You could buy any of the decent-priced to the high-end, mega-dollar PCPs out there and ALL will have the SAME accuracy provided you know it WELL enough and HAVE the skills to extract that accuracy out of it.  And that is why I am unable to state specifically which guns are the most accurate but will at least say that ANY OF THE RIFLES mentioned by the above posters WILL SHOOT TO YOUR ABILITIES.     

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by spinj.
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    Sorry, I meant to state mount the laser on the barrel.  

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by spinj.
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    If the mount is on a PCP rifle all that is needed is hand tight.  There is no need for a torque wrench or to tighten to a torque value to make you sleep easy at night.😉

     

    There are too many people who think that a mount/scope needs to be tightened really well on a PCP to prevent even a half-millimeter of movement.  If you want to see how solid the mount is even with just a hand-tightened mount put a laser on the scope and have the laser dot intersect with the crosshairs of your scope and have at it—bump your scope, tap it, lean your cheek on it, put the rifle (with the scope mounted) in a tight-fitting soft rifle case, smile or even stare at it hard long enough.  You'll see that when you stop the dot returns back to its original position. 

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by spinj.
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    It would be nice if the chrony can also be placed near a target to obtain velocity readings in order to calculate/predict pellet drop/rise over a distance range (very helpful when using ballistic programs and creating range cards).  I’m thinking that with its Bluetooth connectivity it won’t be possible if the target distance is too great, like say, 35 yards.   And I agree that it’s overpriced.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by spinj.
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    Just what is taking Kalibrgun so long to release this rifle?  I am close to giving up on waiting for it.  They keep pushing back the release and failing on their promises to do so—not a good thing to do, Kalibrgun, if you want customers.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by spinj.
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    After checking that the left and right front stock screws aren’t the issue, have you read the posts from the link I shared?  I can almost guarantee the solution I provided therein will rid you of your problem.  I highly recommend that  you DO NOT touch the trigger until you’ve read the posts there.  The safety not latching and having to mash the cocking handle are the symptoms of the problem I stated in that thread.

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    Go to where the link below takes you.  In that post I shared that what you are experiencing  is a common problem of the TX200 and how to resolve it.

    https://www.airgunnation.com/topic/tx-200-cocking-problem/#post-450029

     

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    1975

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