ptthere

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    ptthere
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    847.00

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    ptthere
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    The price makes it that much more interesting.

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    ptthere
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    Over a year ago I tried the artillery hold after having no luck keeping zero with a cheap springer. I had no luck with the artillery hold either. It turns out, the lockup on my barrel was loose/junk. I later tried with a slightly better different air rifle, and immediately started off with the artillery hold. Shot placement was jumping around a bit, so I went ahead and just gripped it like I would one of my powder-burners, and viola, I hit a quarter-size group at 27 yards with the first 5-shot attempt. To each their own…

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    ptthere
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    39 here… I still love my powder-burners but love the differences of modern airgunning.

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    Nice, I will check it out and enter later on!

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    ptthere
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    I've noticed a few items at my local WalMart marked down or on "clearance," such as the Crosman 357 CO2 bb/pellet pistol, but Walmart's "clearance" price was still more expensive than what Crosman was asking a few weeks ago on their own website. All of the other airgun-related stuff seemed normal as usual (for Walmart anyway). The centerfire pistol ammo and .223/5.556/7.62 stuff has all been sold out for a while now.

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    Ghulam

    igolfat8

    I'm pretty sure the flip up covers come with it. They did with my 18 and 32 power scopes.

    Nah, there was that bikini type rubber cover only. not very field friendly for me

    Just out of curiosity, where did you order your scope from? All of the Discovery scopes I have bought came in a box with Butler Creek style slip-up caps in the box with the scope, although it has been a while now since I purchased a new one.

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    ptthere
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    That is a nice, solid-looking bench!

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    ptthere
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    This couple runs the "Hydraulic Press Channel," and also sub-channels including "Beyond the Press." Their bread and butter is crushing things (lots of things) with a 100-ton press.

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    ptthere
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    I'm pretty sure that someone just set the record and was using a 1/4-mile of holdover.

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    ptthere
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    I can't see loose lead pellets hurting a gun anymore than people shooting light PBA pellets through them.

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    ptthere
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    Picked up a Japanese-made Powerline 465 from Walmart for $20. It shoots lights-out at cans and paper, and each CO2 cartridge lasts about 100 shots. Cheap and quick trigger time.

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    ranedouglas

    ….centerpoints arent that bad to me….probably better than the leapers i have had…..and those np2 guns are made in here in america….   except for the trigger , which can be remedied with a $12-15 trigger tune kit from ebay , these are pretty good guns with good american barrels……compareable to an r1 / hw80 , in my opinion as far as power and shootability …..  but the german wood stocked guns have much more invested into them , while most american guns are plastic…..    but i like my jim shockey and my eva shockey that i converted with a .20 lw barrel , and also fitted a barrel for a .25 trail xl  for easy swap-out….   and you'll always be able to get parts cheap !!    crosman customer service is the best.   – paul.   

    I agree, Crosman does have great customer service. Also, with an investment of $1 per rifle and an hour or so of patience, the CBT trigger can be modified to be very smooth. The trigger spring replacement for it is #9700 1/4-Inch x 1/2-Inch x .035-Inch spring. There is an older thread on this forum on how to modify the trigger to smooth it out greatly between stages with a little bit of elbow grease and patience with modification.

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    • This reply was modified 8 months ago by ptthere.
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    smithfan4152

    As mentioned I have mounted another scope, which took less windage it was off 1/2 inch, same distance to the left, where as the centerpoint scope was off nearly 3 inches. I don't see how laser welding the scope rail on the barrel is any cheaper than a drilled and tapped mount, or just an 11 mm rail machined in.  Either way I have it working good, 

    You never specified which Benjamin Summit you have. They all have the same stocks, but there are 6 different variations of the Summit. 2 of them have machined dovetails from the factory, and 4 of them have laser-welded picattiny rails on top. Laser welding in mass production can cost less than drilling and tapping (minus the rail itself).

    Glad to hear things worked out for you.

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    smithfan4152

    Hi again,

    This was a brand new rifle, new scope, and first shots were off 3 inches to the right. So I didn't think the scope was destroyed in the very first shot, also when I adjusted the windage, it repeated for the 20-30 next shot's, and would probably still be holding it's new zero. As mentioned I now have a bug buster on it, and I know it will hold up better. I just feel they screwed up at the factory installing the gut's that the scope would be that far off center of it's own tube, and mounting hardware. I did prove it was not the hardware just the cheaply mfg, scope. 

    I own a couple of the Benjamin Summits, one in .22 and one in .177. I currently have no complaints about the .22. However the recent .177 I purchased I noticed that the picatinny rail is laser-welded on the receiver slightly offset to the barrel bore when holding the rifle with zero cant. It was not drastic enough for my scope to overcome it, but it was noticeable to my eye before I mounted a scope on it.

    And yes, I also have a box in my closet full of CenterPoint 4×32 scopes that came with the different Crosman/Benjamin air rifles I have purchased. I never mounted any of them. Even the 3-9×40 CP that came with the .177 has never been mounted. They just seem too light, flimsy, below-par glass, and I have seen some really bad reviews and results from people trying them out on springers. The scopes that come packaged with these air rifles just seem bottom-of-the-barrel. I am not saying that all CenterPoint scopes are bad, but the packaged/combo ones are about as cheap as it gets. I would definitely suggest trying out a better optic (which shouldn't be hard to do).

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    P_Bachman

    I tried searching crossman.com.  Nope.

    crosman.com?  Certainly.  My point- when providing a domain name with the "dot com" part, be sure to spell it right as otherwise it could redirect someplace nasty.  I know this is just a senatics-type thing, but as soon as you add the .com part, some browsers like to "help' you get there.

    "Semantics."

    You're welcome.

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    ptthere
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    Most of the BIG sales are over, but a few of them are still going, for example:

    The deep-discounted stuff ran this past week through January 1. If any of what is currently left as of January 2 is on sale and of your interest I suggest you move on it before it goes back up.

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    elh0102

    Oldspook, your post mentions something I have not considered,  and it's concerning. If we, as a group of airgun enthusiasts promote airguns to be developed into the realm of high power center fire rifles, we will have done the community a huge disservice. I can see the anti-gun folks firing up the legislation that could effectively end the kind of easy purchase and shipping we now enjoy. And also the practical safety and noise concerns that could be raised, and with good cause. As a retiree, one of my great pastimes is shooting my airguns in the backyard, and I am in town with  close neighbors. I would like to see less aggressive plans for more power, and continued appreciation for airguns as quiet, close range instruments of precision accuracy. All it would take is the wrong thing whispered in the wrong ear in Washington to create regulation nightmare. 

    I find oldspook's timing and reply here to be spot-on, but it is not the first time that such an opinion has been voiced here. I do not see airguns reaching centerfire levels before they eventually get attention from the crooks (politicians). Several countries already have metered regulations of airguns when compared to the U.S…. you don't have to look any further than Canada to see a start of it.

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    Broken_WV_Guy

    Appreciate the ideas but I was more interested in gyroscopic stability than matching powder burning velocities with air. The transonic instability just means that any progress in this area will have to jump to over 1200 fps at the target. Once we can get a projectile moving that fast at range, we would have the option of using similar shaped bullets.

    I know any real progress would cause complication, but my idea was to create a metered and regulated chamber that could be compressed using hydraulic multiplication to greatly raise the PSI of each shot. This should be enough power, but we will let the manufactures figure that out. Whatever comes next, it's going to be moving faster than what we can do today.

     

     

    That's one of the more realistic responses I have seen. Using hydraulics and boosters, you CAN compress air well over 20,000 psi or more, however you would also need some seriously badass seals to hold the air pressure back beyond whatever you were using as a piston within a cylinder/tank. Similar consideration would have to be made for regulation and dispensing air for shots.

    The other problem as I mentioned before would also be thermal issues. During compression, considerable heat would be generated with the air. During firing, agressive cooling would be taking place in very short intervals, and a mild study in physics and thermal dynamics might be of use to consider ways to negotiate and overcome these issues.

    But, the hydraulic idea is still interesting. You probably would not achieve firearm levels of performance, but it could certainly be done above what is usually handled with 3000/4500-lb tanks.

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    I can go straight out my front door and shoot airguns all day long. Unfortunately I cannot do the same with my forearms, as I have a couple of close neighbors. One of them claims they would not mind, but the other one is a little bit unhinged and I would not want to give him a reason to complain about it.

    PT

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 359 total)