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Jonnes

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 550 total)
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    Jonnes
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    Netherlands
    Accuracy: +37

    vinny

    that pellet sure traveled that 276 quick 

    Took 2 seconds between fire and hit, that means at 276 yards the bullet traveled 138 yards per second. That's not fast, thats normal (even on the lower side) for a .25 slug.

    Nice shot!

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    Yes, all parts are interchangeable. The only difference between the two is that the HW77 has open sights and the HW97 doesn't. The 97 has a silencer-like business end. The difference in stock between the 77 and 97 is a higher cheek rest for the 97 because that rifle was ment to be shot with optics. The cheek rest for the 77 is lower because of the open sights. So be aware of that when you change stocks. 

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    Jonnes
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    Sorry guys, but we're having two different discussions here. TS spoke about bending the barrel in order to change the sight line. The other discussion that was introduced later, is bending a barrel back into it's original position. Two different things!

    Just to make sure you guys understand what I'm saying, the first is – regardless of what some might say – a no-go in my book. That is my personal and professional opinion. Either way, both should be a no-go for people who don't know what they are doing. If a professional gun smith with the right tools and experience is willing to do this procedure for you, I'd say go for it if it works for you. But in general, this should NEVER be done by someone who is not experienced and who doesn't have the right tools for the job for obvious reasons. 

    I'm not trolling here, I'm just trying to send a word of warning, because this might cause serious damage to your barrel if done wrong. 

    Moving away from this discussion from this point on, just wanted to correct and clarify some stuff here. 

     

    [Edit=typo]

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    Flintsack
    This discussion would not apply to firearms… but of course this is an air gun forum. 

    I am quite aware of the fact that we're talking about an (piston-driven) airgun. The rules (of physics) apply to any kind of technology that pushes a projectile down a barrel regardless of the power source, being it gunpowder or air. Canting on a bent barrel will be a problem, it's physics mate, just simple physics. 

    It's something I wouldn't do, that's for sure.

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    hkshooter

    Correcting "barrel angle" for the purpose of using a receiver sight is nothing new, companies and smiths have been bending barrels for a long time.

     

    I'm an international competition shooter, gunsmith and have been playing around in the marvellous world of guns for over 34 years now, but I've never ever heard this kind of nonsense before. You don't ever bend barrels for the sole purpose of changing the sight line. For one, canting will become a HUGE issue if you do. Second, you have to have very special measuring and bending tools in order to do this without changing the inner diameter of your barrel which will result in inevitable loss of accuracy. And last but not least, bending just doesn't make sense in any way, because changing the sights by using risers, scope mount shims, MOA rails or adjustable scope mounts, is cheaper and safer.

    Ask any gun smith or gun manufacturer of bending a barrel makes sense in any possible way, and the answer will be either be "are you serious?" or "have you completely lost your marbles?". 

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    Mine loves the JSB Jumbo RS. Although every barrel is different, I've heard many TX200 owners say that these are there preferred pellets.

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    Jonnes
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    … so I bent the barrel for scope use.

     

    You did WHAT?! 😨
    Some folks… 🤐

    Next time, try shimming your scope mounts. A lot safer procedure that won't potentially result in a FUBAR rifle.

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    Jonnes
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    Give it some time, you will eventually turn back from the "dark side". I've been there. PCP's are dead easy to shoot, but the inevitable boredom from hitting target each and every time will make you want to grab one of those springers at some point. It's an itch you can't escape, you will need to scratch. And if you sold them off, you will regret it like I did. At this point I still own my first PCP, the FX Independence in .22 and a more recently aquired Air Arms TX200 with a 22mm short stroke conversion by Tony Leech. Both these rifles will stay with me until the day I die.

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    Jonnes
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    @uglymike has found the magic word; consistency! Find the balance point for your rifle and a comfortable position and do the exact same thing over and over again. Trigger position, trigger pressure build-up, shouldering, the amount of pressure on the trigger hand touching the stock and the support hand must always be loose and in the exact same spot. And don't forget the amount of pressure you punt on your cheek rest with your head, and the pressure with your shoulder on your but plate. This must be exactly the same with each shot. Next, work on your breathing, pull the trigger between heart beats and don't pull or anticipate the shot! Let the rifle do it's thing. Especially with springers, you can't control the energy release of that spring or gas ram. Except that your'e not in control of that power house and just trust the rifle. This is where most people (even those who have been shooting for decades) go wrong.

    I'm not just making this stuff up as I go, I'm a small bore (rimfire, 50m) and air rifle (10m) international competition shooter (the Olympic disciplines) and these are the things make take up about 80% of our training program. I train 2 to 3 times with rimfire, 3 to 4 times a week with air rifle, mostly on these particular things. The reason why learning to shoot springers gives you a HUGE advantage with any other type of rifle, is this. Because with a springer, the result of a change in hold or stance will immediately show in your group size.

    Once you master these things, you will feel when you hit the 10-ring even before you see it. Because all these elements come together in a natural flow of events and result in that most desired 10.9 if you do it all right. I know I sound like Yoda right now, but trust me when I say that training will make you a Jedi Master. 😉

    Edit; pellets is another subject, I always start with JSB's because I found over the years that most air rifles do best with this brand. Save yourself the hassle and frustration with pellet testing. Stay away from the cheaper brands like Gamo for instance, and go right away for RWS and JSB, or if you want to experiment with H&N.

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    @blackthunder, have a look at the Ataman AP16 or Kalibrgun Ocelot. I think that's the type of pistol you're looking for, except for the semi-auto part. With a little tuning of the trigger group, you can turn that thing into a very smooth high-power shooter. It comes with all the options you want and looks the bees knees! Krale in Staphorst sells them, and the beauty of it all, they're cheaper than the Steyr match pistols. 👍

    Groetjes!

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    (De)compression of air in a fraction of a second gets hot, really hot! Up to burning levels on non fire resistant materials. I wouldn't use anything else than tried and tested piston heads. You'd risk damaging the seals. One of those HW seals work best to soften things up, guide rods and other parts made out of delrin also helps. 

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    Not sure what the size is, but can't you walk into a hardware store with the mount and try some headless allen screws?

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    Jonnes
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    It sure shows, now it's just one tiny hole where multiple pellets traveled through. Must say that the TX200 is one of the most easy guns to work on. That is one seriously well designed rifle! 
    Hope this helps others also in their endeavour to make their rifles top notch.

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    Jonnes
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    Went the easy way first, removed that last spacer. I'm now at 567 Ft/s and 11,36 Ft/lbs. I also removed the lube on the spring guide and spring and cleaned the internals again. I also removed 1mm from the spring guide (advised by Tony because the safety wouldn't catch every now and then) and used some 1200 grit sand paper to remove some material on the spring guide so the spring fitted a little bit better. It was a very – if not too – tight fit. Put the whole thing back together and as by a miracle, the rifle started behaving quite differently. Less recoil, much smoother, and it passed the pellet-on-scope test.

    I'm going to leave it as it is for now and will shoot it for a while. This thing feels almost the same as my .22LR rifle now. LOVE IT!!! 😃

    Thanks again Steve! 👍

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    Jonnes
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    Thanks for the tip Steve, I'll give that a try. I still have the original 12 Ft/lbs spring lying around here somewhere, for what I understood that one is a little bit longer than the 205mm spring that Tony supplied the kit with.

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    Jonnes
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    Okay, yesterday morning I took 10 shots with the TX200 before the modification at 25 meters. Mind you, this was with a Titan FAC spring and standard internals. I always found that this TX200 shot a rather disappointing with the FAC spring, the 12 Ft/lbs version a friend of mine has, shot much better. This morning I did the same but with the 22mm conversion, and the results are truly amazing! After first letting the rifle settle with a 50 somewhat shots, the groups were closing. The last 10-shot group is the "after" picture. These are 10meter ISSF air rifle cards, for reference the little 10-dot in the middle is 0.5mm in diameter. This thing shoots a whole lot better now!

    I noticed that the recoil was not what I expected at first, it didn't even pass the pellet-on-scope test (the thing bounced right off), so I removed all three washers (except for the protection washer on the delrin guide rod). After that, it got a bit better though, but still not what I saw is some YouTube movies. Maybe it needs some more time to settle in. The chrono measured a rather constant 600Ft/s and 11.73Ft.Lbf at the muzzle with 14gr H&N Field Target Trophy pellets. Very happy with that so far, and I can't complain about groups like these.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
    • This reply was modified 2 years ago by  Jonnes.
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    Jonnes
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    Impressive numbers @nitrocrushr. That basically comes down to the perfect balance between a regular springer and a PCP air rifle. Yes, the rebuild was quite easy, I also gave me the opportunity to polish some of the moving parts to a nice mirror gloss and do some regular maintenance, which might also help smoothen things out with the shot cycle.

    My spring is 205mm and I have all three washers installed at this point. I'll let the rifle settle in first before playing with the preload and see what gives the most stable results. This afternoon I'm going to do some shooting to see how this new setup handles. But for what I've seen so far, it has become a completely different rifle in the extremely positive sense of the word.

    I do wonder though, what might happen when the piston and rod is made of high-grade aluminium or titanium even. I'll ask Tony about this.

    Keep you updated!

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    Jonnes
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    @Nitrocrusher, you haven't lied a word in your review so far. I did the rebuild today on my .22 TX200, it's been a hassle free job that took me an hour at most. Tony delivers a complete kit with spring, 3 different sized washers, the piston head with seal, and a delrin spring guide. I put the rifle back together again, and the cocking takes less effort compared to the original FAC spring. It's dark now here, so I'll be putting some lead on target tomorrow to see how it shoots. Can't wait. 💪

    Tony has been very helpful with tips on what to look out for (great guy by the way).

     

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    Jonnes
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    I bought the kit yesterday. Tony offers a DIY kit including a new spring and shipping to Europe for just 150 pound sterling. The rebuild will take some effort because of the loctite on the compression tube and piston rod, but nothing that you can't do yourself. Here are some instructional videos:
     

    My TX is the MKIII HC FAC (14,7 fpe) and it gives quite the kick. Tuning it down to the 11fpe range with this mod will undoubtedly smoothen things out and make it more manageable. I can't wait to do the rebuild and will post my experiences also here.

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    Jonnes
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    The FWB300s; golden.
    The smile on Nate's face; PRICELESS!!!

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 550 total)