Bullfrog

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    Bullfrog
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    $326.18

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    My airguns exist for hunting first and foremost so hunting versatility is my number one consideration

    Its hard to separate caliber from the gun. .300 is my favorite caliber, but my favorite gun has a .308 barrel that shoots both .308 bullets and .300 pellets well and easily adjusts between 80fpe and 200fpe. That .308 is my all purpose gun, but that’s because its acting as a hybrid of 2 calibers. 

    I think .300 can kill everything in the southern US woods with a brain shot and most things with a lung shot. 

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    GQ

    Interesting that we do not need slug liner for those slugs. I think we need a slug liner barrel for NSA or Nielsen.

    I am wrong or right ?

    It depends if you are asking about a FX barrel or pellet barrels more generally. I’ve found that both NSA and Rat Snipers shoot well out of rifled barrels that shoot JSB pellets well. So a .25 Marauder, Condor, ect. all shoot the swaged bullets well with their factory barrels. All bets may be off with FX’s smooth twist barrel. 

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    The way Airforce valves work makes them very prone to valve lock. The back pressure from the weight of the projectile has a lot to do with how much an Airforce valve opens up. A 290 gr bullet at 3000 psi will likely open up all the way, while a 145 gr roundball will likely have valve lock at 3000 psi on the same spring tension setting. 

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    I have a 2016 .25 Condor that has the high flow factory valving but not the most up-to-date factory valving. Quite honestly it likes all pellets and slugs I have given it from as light as the 25 gr JSBs to as heavy as 60 grain cast slugs from NOE, with power ranges set from 45fpe to 110fpe. It loves all Neilsens I have tried. I think the LW barrels that Condors have are super. 

    A big trick to keeping the Airforce guns accurate is to make sure the spin loc tank is tightened down very tight. If you can loosen it by torquing it with your hand with heavy pressure, it isn't tight enough. It isn't enough to just trust the set screw to keep it in place. If the tank isn't super tight, the gun's frame will flex during the shot and you'll never get a consistent POI. On one of my Texans I am experimenting with blue loc-titing the tank in place and that seems to have stiffened it up well. 

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    If you’re into camping, some tins make great DIY alcohol stoves. 

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    I think a lot of it is what it is. 

    Airguns are an industry, and there’s strong ties between the industry and the youtube personalities they sponsor. It may be that what’s happening is that some channels quickly plug other channels that share the same sponsors and their subscriber base all jumps in together. 

    Its a double-edged sword. I remember when Youtube cracked down on Airgun channels some of the big names circled wagons around each other and left others out to dry. I’m sure eliminating competition and corporate ties was a motivation for at least some of the selection as to who got saved and who didn’t. Youtube listens to money. 

    I’m glad to be a maverick that isn’t owned by anyone in the industry and speaks my mind freely. Yet I’m also glad there is an industry that has a financial motivation to protect airgunners’ rights. One has to accept the bad with the good. 

    The true bad guy is Youtube. And I’m glad I didn’t grovel before them when the bans happened. I called them out instead, while many of the more popular airgun channels begged. And yes, I paid the price. My popular airgun videos were blacklisted and traffic has been cut off to them. But that tells me all the more that Youtube isn’t an entity who’s rear is worth kissing. 

    I dig your videos Dana. I know what it feels like to pour everything into a video only for some dweeb to flag it and another dweeb at Youtube to label it something silly like “terroristic.” But that’s the price we have to pay so long as dweebs are running the show. Who knows what change may happen in the near or far future that causes the algorithm to be turned on its head and what is now blacklisted becomes popular again?

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    https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world-news/trophy-hunters-bones-turned-mush-18987291

     

    This just further proves my point. Nothing makes this man a “trophy hunter” except that he takes pictures of his kills sometimes and he hunts something that seems exotic. 

    Its all anti-hunting spin. Don’t fall for it. 

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    Its your choice to make, go with whatever your comfortable with. 

    But for the record, that picture of the ladies posing with their doe is an awesome picture and something to be proud of. I see nothing wrong with it. Its very tasteful and looks like a great preservation of a wonderful memory for those ladies. 

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    Figure that projectile weight on the Texans have a lot to do with how much air it moves per shot. A Texan shooting a 145 grain roundball at 900fps will be a lot quieter than the same gun shooting a 290 grain slug at 900fps. 

    That’s one way db tests may be misleading. 

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    Run along little antelope. I set you free from this trap you’ve caught yourself in. Until we meet again!

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    I answered your post, showing how your definition of bushmeat was provably wrong, with the implication that you’ve adopted the anti-hunting negative connotation for bushmeat, which proves my point that we hunters have been influenced by the jargon of the anti-hunting movement in ways we don’t even realize  

    The position you’re in is either to concede you were wrong to get in a tussy over what I said about how the term “bush meat” is used by antis to implicate all sustenance hunting overseas, because I’ve been proven correct. Or alternatively, offer concrete facts to proves my position is wrong after all. 

    What you don’t get to do is deflect and say “just re-read my posts.” That’s a cop out. I destroyed your point about bushmeat. Unless you can undestroy it and destroy my own. Thru facts. That’s how debating works. 

    And you don’t get to barge into a place where you just registered where we don’t know you from an anti and throw out garbage buzzwords like “group think” and “straw man” in the wrong contexts and not get called out for it.

    If you want credibility, you have to earn it. And you can start by stop deflecting and actually revisit what you’ve said about “bushmeat” in light of the accepted definition, that it includes all meat harvested in the tropics. From which you have to admit their is no way to distinguish African bushmeat from American venison or from Native American hunting of yesteryear. And that’s really what you’re avoiding. You don’t want to answer that point. Which is fine if you want to walk away, but you don’t get to swagger out of it with the same chip on your shoulder when you walked in when you picked the fight. 

     

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    You’ve done picked a fight you can’t win and now you want to run away. 

    I’ll let you… like a little African antelope set free from a bush meat hunter’s snare. 

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    No straw men here. I simply stated my position on trophy hunting and that the term “bush meat” has been similarly created and thrown out there by antis to have negative connotation when it shouldn’t, you got mad and attacked me personally and made some claims about what “bush meat” means. I’ve refuted your claims with facts about what “bush meat” really means, and now the ball is in your court to refute the facts I’ve asserted if I’m wrong.

    And my overall point still stands. Just as the term “bush meat” has been put out there with negative connotation by antis to make it seem that “bush meat” is a bad thing, when all it really means is “sustenance hunting” in the third world, so “trophy hunting” has also been manipulated. When hunters use the term “trophy hunting” we historically mean it to mean hunting only to take a physical trophy off the animal, which we generally frown upon. Antis have made the term to mean any exotic (meaning non-Western) big game hunting. They want us to automatically see an African game animal killed in a picture and call it “trophy hunting” because of the negative connotation trophy hunting has. They want other hunters to frown on African hunting as if killing an antelope on Africa is somehow morally different than killing a whitetail buck in Ohio.

    Its not wrong to hunt African or other exotic big game so long as the hunting is done in a sustainable manner. Where “trophy hunting” has come to really mean “African big game hunting,” trophy hunting is not wrong in and of itself.   

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    Read what I wrote carefully. I didn’t call “you” racist. I said “us.” As in us in the West as in how we dictate impractical standards to the third world. We tell them what they can and cannot do with their own animals from afar when we aren’t the ones needing to hunt some obscure African varmint to feed or our families or have to live with elephants destroying our crops or lions ripping our children out of their beds in the middle of the night. 

    So what say you now that I’ve shown how broad the definition of “bush meat” is? Can you distinguish an African killing a small antelope to feed is family and me killing a Florida deer to feed mine? I don’t think you can.

    So why when the African does it, is it called “bush meat” with a negative connotation, and when I do it, its just “hunting?”

     

     

     

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    Shoz

    Bullfrog, please reread Strietwise and Gerry52’s to name just two thoughtful posts, to think that somehow because they have their own sense of what constitutes ethical hunting implies that they’ve been fooled by the “antis” is foolish.  I am thankful that hunters are not required to be lockstep into some group think on hunting ethics. I do disagree with some definitions of trophy hunting and frankly some forms of it, if defended unilaterally by hunters would make us all look bad. 

    As for your bushmeat hunting comparison by modern Africans to North America Indians subsistence hunting thousands of years ago, it’s simply not comparable. The bushmeat trade refers to the non-traditional hunting of non-game animals for meat. Wild chimpanzees and other forest animals are systematically hunted and sold as meat through markets across Africa and cities across the world. What once was a form of subsistence hunting in rural villages, has now evolved into a commercial trade that has grown in scale over recent decades.People, not necessarily anti hunters, are worried that the bush meat trade could help drive some animals to extinction. That is hardly subsistence hunting comparable to the North American hunters of thousands of years ago or even of Africans a century ago  

    It is healthy for all of us to have our own definitions of what constitutes ethical hunting. To try and tamp down the discussion is not. 

    You’re being intellectually dishonest by accusing me trying to “tamp down the discussion” and throwing around buzz worlds like “group think” just because I disagree with you. The only person who has posted a negatively emotional response aimed at anyone in this thread is you. That’s a heck of a thing for you to do, especially considering you’ve only been a member of this forum a few days. That actually makes you the person who’s trying to stifle disagreement. 

    As for “bush meat”, antis define the term broadly to include any hunting of wild animals “over there” for food. Here is the definition:

    “Bushmeat, wildmeat, or game meat is meat from non-domesticated mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds hunted for food in tropical forests.”

    That’s the wikipedia definition  

    See, they define it as the hunting of any animals for food, with the only distinguishing characteristic being that it comes from tropical areas. 

    The only reason the hunting of a whitetail deer  for food isn’t called “bush meat” is because it isn’t happening in Africa. 

    Now my point has been proven. You had a negatively emotional reaction when I mentioned bush meat because you’ve been conditioned to believe the term is only referring to the illegal commercial trade in certain odd animal meats, when if fact it means any wild meat harvesting “over there.” You reacted just like the antis have conditioned you to thru propaganda campaigns  

    Its actually pretty racist for us to criticize Africans for doing the same thing we do here with our own wild animals. Its also arrogant for us to dictate to an African what is and isn’t “traditional” for them to hunt. Anyone who knows what sustenance hunting is like in the real world knows that all edible animals are on the menu for people that are hunting for their supper and have been for generations.   

     

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    I’m not sure that “trophy hunting” is a real thing. It seems to be a buzz word used by anti-hunters in the media to describe hunting of large and exotic game, but implies that its somehow different than the average joe going out an arrowing a whitetail spike on the back 40 and saving the skull cap. Its not. It just targets different animals.

    The idea behind using the term “trophy hunting” is to cause even other hunters to turn against big game hunting. Its a divide and conquer strategy  

    “Bush meat” is another buzz word the antis made up. When we read about now-extinct stone age, Native American, cultures hunting what’s around them for food, its called “sustenance hunting.” When modern Africans do the same thing, its called “bush meat” and its a bad thing.

    Its all a mind game. Don’t be fooled by it  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    And just to show you how we role in Florida, and why Florida Man exists, here's why you have to do your research:

    The FWC website and State-published brochure says the following about hunting reptiles in the right-of-way of a public road:

    Taking or attempting to take wildlife is illegal on, upon or from rights-of-way of federal, state or county-maintained roads, whether paved or otherwise, except reptiles and amphibians may be taken without the use of firearms and raptors may be taken per Rule 68A-9.005, F.A.C. Casting dogs from rights-of-way is considered attempting to take wildlife and constitutes violation of this regulation.

    Ah. An airgun isn't a firearm. Therefore according to the FWC website it looks like I can take reptiles within the right-of-way of a road with an airgun. But then the website has this ominous warning:

    This publication is provided as a guide to Florida hunting laws and regulations; however, the Wildlife Code of the State of Florida is the final authority on hunting laws. The Florida Wildlife Code, Division Number 68A of the Florida Administrative Code, can be obtained at flrules.org.

    So the website and brochure is a summary of the regulations, not the regulations themselves. If the summary is somehow wrong, then the actual regulation in the Code controls. Here's the real regulation about taking wildlife in a right-of-way:
     

    68A-4.008 Taking Wildlife on Roads and Rights-of-Way Prohibited.

    (1) It shall be unlawful to take or attempt to take wildlife (except for the collection of amphibians or reptiles without the use of a gun and the take of raptors per Rule 68A-9.005, F.A.C.) on, upon or from the right-of-way of any federal, state or county-maintained road whether paved or otherwise. Taking or attempting to take wildlife (except for the collection of amphibians and reptiles without the use of a gun and the take of raptors per Rule 68A-9.005, F.A.C.) while such wildlife is on or upon the right-of-way of any federal, state or county-maintained road whether paved or otherwise, is prohibited.

     

    Uh oh. Is an airgun a "gun?" Yes, under the definition provided in the regulations:

     

    (40) Gun – Shotgun, rifle, pistol, revolver, air gun, gas gun, blow gun, bow, crossbow, or any other device mechanically propelling an arrow, spear, or other projectile.

     

    Therefore you may not take an iguana in the right-of-way of a road with an airgun. And it took digging beyond the wildlife agency's own website to get that answer. Whoever wrote the official state brochure wasn't careful.

     

    Welcome to Florida. 

     

    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    I'm a criminal prosecutor in Florida that handles the FWC's poaching cases in my area and I have deep ties to the FWC and its predecessor organization the GFC. We need to go thru this line by line to correct some of this info.

    First, public land is not necessarily open to hunting until someone tells you otherwise. State owned land is managed by different state agencies, and its up to each state agency whether they'll allow hunting or not. Many of them have regulations buried in the Florida Administrative Code, and sometimes by legislative statute, that prohibits hunting unless stated otherwise. They don't need to post "no hunting" on the property. Its up to you to research it, and it may mean breaking open the lawbooks. The reason you can hunt the canal lands if you're in the Miami area is because the City is expressly allowing it. You're not allowed to hunt it by default. The City is giving you the same permission that a private landowner would on private land. 

    You ought not be shooting anything within the right-of-way of a publicly maintain road. Its completely prohibited to do so. See Florida Administrative Code 68A-4.008. Only if the right-of-way is exempted and posted as being exempted are you allowed to take wildlife within the right-of-way of a road with a gun. The berm is considered a part of the right-of-way depending on how wide it is.

    The Wildlife Management Areas fall under the FWC's direct management. It is a fact that WMAs are not open to hunting of exotics year-round by default. Each WMA has its own regulations that you must consult. The ONLY WMAs in Florida where you may hunt iguanas year-round are the 22 named WMA in that FWC executive order I posted. You may NOT iguana hunt year-round in any of the others unless the regulations of that WMA specifically say so. 

    Here is the FWC page on iguanas:

    https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/profiles/reptiles/green-iguana/

    You will see they reference the executive order I posted an also states that those 22 WMAs are open. There are 160 WMAs in the State. 22 out of 160 isn't many.

    There are other WMAs open to iguana hunting, but only during other designated hunting seasons and when a person has the proper hunting and WMA licenses. Consult this list of brochures to see which ones:

    https://myfwc.com/hunting/wma-brochures/

    When the executive order went out 2 years ago, it was controversial because it did not open exotic reptile hunting in Big Cypress year-round, which is ground zero for the python problem. These rules are really about pythons. This public announcement the FWC did didn't change any regulations, it just brought to the public's attention that the python regulations also apply to iguanas. 

    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by Bullfrog.
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    Here's the FWC order in question:

    https://myfwc.com/media/3682/eo-17-11.pdf

    Only those public lands named in the order are open to iguana hunting year-round. 

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