Zeroing a Regal XL .22

Forums General Airgunning Zeroing a Regal XL .22

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    DellaDog
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    I noticed something today while zeroing a new scope on the Regal. I took off a Sightron 3.5-10×44 and put on a Bushnell Elite 6500 2.5-16×50 (wanted to try the extra magnification.)

    I don’t have a chrony yet, but was a bit curious to find something after I’m zeroed in at 25yds.

    With an initial fill to 230bar the gun is dead on accurate, within a pellet width every shot. As the pressure dropped off a bit (says 10-15 shots) the POI moves UP by about a pellet height and stays that way till the pressure falls off dramatically (say 45 shots.) I would have expected, if anything, after the pressure dropped off some, the POI would FALL, not rise.
     
    My guess is that after the initial fill, the muzzle velocity is actually lower, then after a few shots I’m in the bell curve and she’s shooting at a higher velocity? Hence the higher point of impact?
     
    Any ideas?

    BTW, both scopes are very nice (focus down to 10yds. and beautifully clear) The higher magnification of the Bushnell is nice, but I think I like the Sightron a touch more. The Bushy makes it easier to see the pellet poi though.
     

    • This topic was modified 4 months ago by DellaDog.
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    cahil_2
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    I only fill my regal to 200 bar and don’t experience that as far as I can tell.

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    JohnL57
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    I’ll make a guess that the air pressure in the gun is keeping the valve from fully opening till the pressure drops after shooting for a while. I’d say the gun is telling you to fill to a lower starting pressure.
     So I agree, you’re not into the sweet spot till after the first 10-15 shots. You may want to shoot till you reach the optimum pressure, check how many Bar or psi it is, and then make note of where that is so you don’t waste air and pellets.
     

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    BenSeager
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    Yes you will have that as speed increases but watch where there all the same and note the tank pressures on each shot that way you will see how high to fill and how many accurate shots until it starts to shift again that that will give you x number of shots that will be very consistant then just refill to where that started instead of the full 230bar. If your gun has adjustable hammer spring you can level that out might not be as much power but it will be very consistant. Best done with a chrono but I did pretty well with my marauder before I got one.

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    Skip-in-WV
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    Ours is a 177. We noticed the same thing. Now we fill to 3000lbs/200 bar, and get 35 good shots.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Skip-in-WV.
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    “JohnL57″I’ll make a guess that the air pressure in the gun is keeping the valve from fully opening till the pressure drops after shooting for a while. I’d say the gun is telling you to fill to a lower starting pressure.
     

    
That makes sense, time to purchase a chrony and confirm. Thanks.

    Hell of a rifle and scope combo, now I need a .25 to put the other scope on. 

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    Regal_US
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    I’ve shot many strings for my Regal .22 over a chrony. The harper sling shot is a fantastic invention, but it does not completely eliminate the curve of an unregulated gun, which in principle will behave better. If you fill to a higher pressure than the recommended value on your rifle (there’s a small decal indicating the value on the gun) the spread on your shot curve will increase, especially at the start. Nothing to worry about; its a great gun, but for maximum accuracy, fill 10 bar  below the suggested pressure, and shorten the shot string by about 5 shots.

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    “Regal_US”I’ve shot many strings for my Regal .22 over a chrony. The harper sling shot is a fantastic invention, but it does not completely eliminate the curve of an unregulated gun, which in principle will behave better. If you fill to a higher pressure than the recommended value on your rifle (there’s a small decal indicating the value on the gun) ….

    
Thanks, Ive seen that decal mentioned elsewhere, but can’t seem to find it on the gun. Do you need to remove the stock?

    The pressure gauge is primarily green, yellow and red – Ive been filling to the end of the green band just before the white line – that’s right at 230bar according to my fill tank gauge. I’ll back it off a notch. 

    My first PCP and I love it, looking forward to the Wolverine MK2. 

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    Sheharyar
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    Yep.What John said is correct.

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    DellaDog
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    Could someone please explain how to embed a URL so a picture shows up vice the URL?
    Trying to embed tis picture below, thanks.

    http://www.loanhouse.com/images/chrony.png

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by DellaDog.
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    “DellaDog”Could someone please explain how to embed a URL so a picture shows up vice the URL?
    Trying to embed tis picture below, thanks.

    http://www.loanhouse.com/images/chrony.png

    I guess you have to use an approved service – just tried photobucket, horribly slow. This is from IMGUR, lightening quick compared to PB.

    This chart confirms the lower velocity for the first 10 shots or so, looks like 210 Bar or so is the ideal fill pressure.

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    Regal_US
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    Here’s the location of the decal with the suggested fill pressure: right side and front. I guess SWP means suggested working pressure? 

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    DellaDog
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    Wow, I just looked and it’s there just as you describe – and it’s 210!

    Everything now adds up and it’s great to see my unscientific observations, the numbers provided in the chart above AND Daystate’s recommended fill pressure all lead to the same conclusion – 210 fill it is. 

    Thanks for the picture. 

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by DellaDog.
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