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The enjoyment of hunting regardless of success

Forums Hunting The enjoyment of hunting regardless of success

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    Profile photo of glassman
    glassman
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    A few pictures from my final foray into the desert last year, December 31st last Saturday. Always so nice and peaceful in the desert. I have always been of the opinion that any day spent outdoors, especially hunting, is a good day. It is an even better day if you see anything. Better yet if you are able to get a shot and be successful. I always see pictures and posts of the very successful hunts here on the forum so I figured I would share / show what I consider to be a day well spent even if I was not successful in my ultimate quest for the day.
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    A view over one of my calling sets.
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    Some of what I carried out on this trip
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    It always amazes me how green the “desert” actually is. Especially after a little rain. It did lightly rain on and off through the day.

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    Just thought I would share my 2 cents.

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    Profile photo of LNielsen
    LNielsen
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    This is medicine for the soul. Beautiful country for sure. Thanks for sharing with us  :)

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    Profile photo of Renz
    Regarval
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    Beautiful place, been in the nature is all it matters. thanks for sharing!

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    Profile photo of hasenpfeffer
    hasenpfeffer
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    When I saw the title of your post, I was going to comment about the millions of acres of Arizona state trust land that are accessible to hunters and hardly anyone else.  But I guess you know all about that. :)

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    Profile photo of EMrider
    EMrider
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    Great contribution. 

    I have a similar attitude towards hunting.  Regardless of the outcome, a day in the field hunting is a win.

    R

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    Profile photo of Jason Whittemore
    JasonW
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    Well said.  Nice to be out in the wonderful scenery as it’s all a part of the hunt.

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    Profile photo of bowwild
    bowwild
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    Very nice country!  It is also amazing how many critters live in that country!  

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    Profile photo of Jeffhalfrack
    Jeffhalfrack
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    More pics please,,,,,here in New Yok ,,,we don’t have critters that want to kill us,,,,but I would love to learn the desert some day thanks,,,,,by the way, my son 10 and I spent the day stump shooting I am into traditional archery ,,build my own bows too . Thanks JeffW

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    Profile photo of glassman
    glassman
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    @hasenpfeffer indeed.  On this last foray I was just a 45 minute drive and 20 minute hike away from my house in Phoenix. Out in the vicinity of 7 springs. NE of Phoenix. A person could spend a lifetime in just a small corner of this state and still never see everything there is in that area. An interesting thing that one does not truly appreciate unless you get out in the desert and desert mountains. Before I moved here I had read many historical and historical fiction accounts of the desert south west about how people found something (a spring, mineral deposits, hidden valleys or canyons) and memorized land marks to ensure their return to the same spot, only to spend the rest of their life looking and trying to find that same location again without success. Also how the native indian tribes (apache, pima, navajo, hopi, yavapai, papago, yuma … the list goes on) could be so elusive and difficult to fight. Again a person has to go out into the desert and hike around to even begin to understand what all is out there. Here is a small example. If you look at the 3rd picture above you see a ridge line coming in from the left edge of the photo and dropping down, behind it in the center another ridge line and further to the right behind it another ridge line and behind it the mountains. It was just over a quarter mile to the top of that first ridge line. It looks, in the picture, and in person like a relatively straightforward hike up with a couple small washes and minor humps in the terrain to get up to the top. Not. It took about 20 minutes to get up to the top of that first visible ridge. Here is what you didn’t see unless you decided to make that hike and why it took that long. Within 50 yards of where the photo was taken is a cut in the terrain, a wash or ravine where water drains down hill. At that point it is about 18 inches deep. You hike another 200 yards and that cut is 4 to 5 feet deep. Within the next 50 yards it is almost 10 feet deep. Then it slowly get shallower the further up hill you hike. Several other smaller cuts dump into it as you go further up hill. When you are within 100 yard of the top of the ridge these cuts are again just a few to 18 inches deep.There were at least 3 or 4 of these “cuts” on that section of the first ridge line. You can’t see them unless you hike up the hillside. You could hide a good 40 to 50 people in those few cuts on that hillside. You could travel past them within 100 yards or less and never see them. Here is the other part. That ridge line is maybe half to 3/4 of a mile long. There are at least 3 dozen cuts in that ridge line the same size or maybe slightly larger and deeper. When you are standing or hiking past the bottom of that ridge line it is virtually impossible to differentiate any one of those cuts from another that is only 200 to 300 feet away. Then when you step back even further (look at the small sections of the 3 ridge lines in the photo) all the ridge lines in the vicinity look alike. What you also don’t see is the deep wash / canyon between that first ridge and the 2nd one. It runs down hill from left to right in the photo. The bottom of that wash is a solid 300 to 350 feet below the top of the first ridge line. Just standing there in person or looking at the picture you would never guess. When out hiking in the desert you quickly learn to pick out game trails to follow. Much easier to walk on and less perilous. However they rarely if ever follow a straight line. Combine that with every plant wanting to impale you, footing being moderate at best and traversing terrain that is quite uneven and rocky and you find it takes 20 minutes to hike up a moderate ridge line just over a quarter mile away and 300 feet up. If you stick to the forest service roads / trails and other proven trails you can make good time but you miss quite a bit. This is why I like to hike off the beaten path when possible. Enjoy the area. You never know what you will come across. That is why I always have a GPS along with to “mark” points of interest for future return if I so desire. I have stumbled upon an unmarked spring / pool in a pile of rocks out in the middle of “no where” along with a long lost / forgotten mine shaft (it only went 50 feet into the side of a small canyon wall), a large hill of quartz (you can see it on google earth if you know where to look and what it is you are seeing) all within a hours hike of camp creek. The water pool and mine shaft were previously unknown and not marked by the forest service. However I digress. Until next time happy hunting.

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    Profile photo of hasenpfeffer
    hasenpfeffer
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    The variety of terrain in Arizona is amazing.  I’ve hunted around Santa Ritas and Sierritas, which are next door neighbors as mountain ranges go, and even those nearby places are very different.

    That’s a cool looking bag.  Does your entire kit fit in there?  I never go out into the desert without my 2L Camelbak plus a small puncture-resistant backup bottle.

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    Profile photo of Sheharyar
    Sheharyar
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    Thanks for sharing.
    Here’s mine

    The awesome scenery of my country.

    • This reply was modified 5 months ago by Sheharyar.
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    Profile photo of T3PRanch
    T3PRanch
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    I lived in the San Tan mountains SE of Phoenix and due south of Queen Creek back in the 80’s just after I got married. Had quite a few friends out there. I miss it terribly at times. We lived without utilities. They have since made an equestrian park out of the BLM land that bordered my property and the piece of property just north of what I owned is now a “stable” and “parking area” for horsemen (determined from Google Earth Photos). You will know the place I am speaking of if there is a Dome House on top of a hill there. 

    Thurmond

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    Profile photo of Alan
    Alan
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    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Serenity is in one’s mind. Either way, being out away from the pressures of life, can be both beautiful and serene. Thanks for sharing.
     

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    Profile photo of NMshooter
    NMshooter
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    I have to say one of my most memorable hunts was a very slow day hunting wise but got the chance to catch up with my father. At the end of the hunt we had a swan fly overhead about 20 feet. At that time, it was very rare to see them in the area. Was a special treat to spend time in the outdoors with my father and see one of these amazing creatures in flight and up close! 

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    Profile photo of scubajeeper
    scubajeeper
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    I was about twenty feet up a tree in my climbing stand deer hunting at Thanksgiving, it had just gotten light enough to see to hunt and an owl came flying right at me, we were eye to eye when he veered off to my left, it was so cool, I didn’t see a deer that day but I’ll never forget that scene. You can have memorable moments and never fire a shot.

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    Profile photo of crosman2016
    crosman2016
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    “Sheharyar”Thanks for sharing.
    Here’s mine

    The awesome scenery of my country.

     

    
Nice.  I wish I lived in an area like that.

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