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Inexpensive air tank

Forums Air Tanks, Pumps, & Compressors Inexpensive air tank

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    Profile photo of jusanothajoe
    jusanothajoe
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    “FunGun”I too would be interested in hearing about AL tanks rated over 3000psi.  I have (1A) Steel tanks rated at 3500psi, but all my Aluminum tanks are rated at 3000psi.

    ​I have a 100 cf  aluminum tank that is rated at 3300 psi. My dive shop will fill it to 3500 psi.
    ​If you do a google search, you will find them. Luckily mine was given to me. 
    ​Think they run around $300

     

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    Profile photo of jlc
    jlc
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    Members on this forum will spend 2K on a gun but seem to always put price before anything else when it comes to air tanks, compressors etc.

    I always like a bargain, but my bargain comes from a known source of good or really in my case, new equipment, tanks, compressor, fittings etc.

    Compressed air vessels are bombs, personally i won’t buy a used, tank, just me, but tanks can be lethal, make sure you are totally confident in who you purchase tanks and fittings from.  Personally, there is no one selling a used tank, especially on the internet, that i could vouch for so i wouldn’t purchase one from them, they don’t even know the tanks history.

    All of the certification procedures are there for a reason.

    I have my own compressor, but i still took my two scuba tanks that i bought new, never been in the water, mis handled, over filled, etc. to the  actual facility that does the hydro test.

    Don’t encourage or request that a tank be overfilled, they may be tested to 150% of their pressure rating, and you want all the air you can get, but error on the side of caution.

    In the end each person will do what they want, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish, you are dealing with a potential bomb, treat them with great care.

    It is just the cost of safety in this hobby/sport.

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    jusanothajoe
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    I completely agree with being safe.
    ​My 3300 psi tank was hydro tested at 5750 psi. 
    ​My dive shop is allowed, and does fill up to 10% over tank rating. ( their words ) but I have heard another dive shop say the same.
    ​I’m good with this. But like you said to each his on.

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    Profile photo of Saltlake58
    Saltlake58
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    “jusanothajoe”I completely agree with being safe.
    ​My 3300 psi tank was hydro tested at 5750 psi. 
    ​My dive shop is allowed, and does fill up to 10% over tank rating. ( their words ) but I have heard another dive shop say the same.
    ​I’m good with this. But like you said to each his on.

    
The other thing to remember about tanks, is that if it blows, it’s not just the owner that gets hurt.  Rarely do we shoot alone.  Safety of the people around us is our responsibility when shooting.  Should we say that airgun safety stretches way past the barrel of the gun and all the way down to the tanks?

    Here’s an example of what a tank can do when it blows.  22 Plinkster purposely shot the tanks at a good distance and the explosive power was enough to do some real damage:

    Yup, we spend $2,000 on a gun, $1000 on the optiics, but scrimp on the support systems.  That makes no sense what so ever.

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    Profile photo of jlc
    jlc
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    There is a new thread, Better to Be Safe, in the general air gunning section that discusses this issue.

    http://www.airgunnation.com/topic/better-to-be-safe/

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    dodge3500
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    I have 6 expired cf tanks I use regularly 3 60 minute and 3 30 minutes that I totally feel comfortable using for another 15 years.I have been around these tanks since new without any issues what so ever.They have been maintained and hydro tested until they expired .
    I do not think after 15 years they just go boom all of a sudden because of a government 15 year rule.
    Now having said that do I feel people should run out and buy expired tanks Hell No ,like I said I’ve been around these tanks and know exactly how they’ve been taken care of.Im  positive my tanks would pass any hydro test anytime.
    I would not personally buy an expired tank from eBay or anywhere else and risk getting myself hurt to save a buck.
    I actually worry more about my cheap fill station getting me hurt more than my expired tanks.I hope to be purchasing a JoeB Cascade fill station to fill from soon.
    Outta my 6 tanks only one ever saw use in the field and that was just for training.
    I will be looking into this new testing for my tanks just because it’s a good thing to do.:)
    Thanks

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    Saltlake58
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    I don’t thing there is such a thing as an inexpensive tank.  They do not, as of yet, exist.  It’s one of those things that if you shoot PCP, just plan on shelling out for the DOT tanks, 15 year life span (unless you use that new ultra sound method that also costs $$$) and 5 year hydro until further notice.

    ​Every time I do the calculations on the tanks, doesn’t matter which tank, it’s not cheap!

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    dodge3500
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    I was very fortunate as I got all my tanks for free.:)
    Lol I was shocked that the big Texan didn’t at least go through one side of the tanks and it actually took a 308 powder burner to do it.The sudden release if all the pressure can be devastating for sure.
    Good video

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by dodge3500.
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    Profile photo of Centercut
    Centercut
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    One thing I’ve discovered after much research is that the 15 year service life is pretty much arbitrary, and based on outdated manufacturing processes from over 30 years ago for fiberglass cylinders.

    A summary is copied below from a recent study done on 15 versus 30 year service life for CFFC cylinders. Bottom line up front, there is NO REASON not to use the CFFC cylinder as long as it is tested (hydro) every 5 years and it doesn’t have disqualifying mechanical damage. DOT-SP 10915 and 10945 cylinders made to ISO 11119-2  were specifically pointed out as having been manufactured for a 30 year service life.
     
    -Over 300 end-of-life (15 years old) DOT-CFFC cylinders have been tested to ISO 11119-2 “at manufacture” acceptance requirements, and passed.

    -Three years of intensive studies requested by the US Navy and DOT which followed ISO 11119-2 “at manufacture” testing procedures have conclusively shown that the DOT-CFFC cylinders can be safely used for at least 15 years beyond their current lifetime.

    The tests showed that the cylinders were still meeting “at manufacture” design requirements, even after 15 years of hard use (many of the cylinders in the studies were from large metropolitan fire departments and had seen extensive use in the field).

    -Current failures have been due to mishandling of the cylinders, not due to failure of the cylinder due to fatigue.

    -DOT-CFFC cylinders have been fatigued up to 24,000 cycles at developed pressure (5192 psi for a cylinder with an operating pressure of 4500 psi), and did not have liner leaks. This number of cycles, according to ISO 11119-2, results in an infinite life cylinder..

    -Cylinders have been life extended and re-qualified using these special permits.

    No data has been presented that shows SCBA DOT-CFFC cylinders are not safe to life extend.

     

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    dodge3500
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    Nice info:)
    thanks

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